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Linux vs. Windows on 64-Bit Chips

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Linux
Microsoft

The now classic debate over whether Linux or Windows is most effective in a corporate environment now has a fresh point of discussion: the performance of 64-bit desktops.

For the first time in history, there are more Linux software choices than Windows choices -- in the 64-bit arena -- but it is likely that the situation will not remain that way for long.

Companies that are moving in the 64-bit direction -- and some analysts say that should be every company -- will have to look at which operating system is better for their databases, Web server applications and even VoIP Latest News about VoIP applications.

Let the debate begin anew, in other words.

No matter what happens in the future, right now the penguin rules the roost when it comes to 64-bit applications. Companies that want to get a jump on 64-bit performance will probably choose Linux just to be able to get started quickly.

With the launch of Windows in the 64-bit arena, the desktop paradigm will start changing quickly. That means companies willing to wait until there are more Windows-based 64-bit applications will likely find that they have a tough decision.

"Linux can take advantage of the market just like Windows can," he said. "The rise of 64-bit is potentially an accelerant for Linux, it can open the door for some applications to move to Linux."

Brian Stevens, Red Hat vice president of operating systems development and some others in the Linux market, believe that the Linux vs. Windows boxing match does not need to be fought because the two can coexist.

Stevens says, "I.T. can seamlessly introduce the best 64-bit platform into their environment while quickly leveraging the latest advances in 64-bit technology such as dual core."

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