Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Hitachi and Fujitsu tout new 100GB notebook drives

Filed under
Hardware

Hitachi Global Storage Technologies and Fujitsu have both begun shipping new notebook hard-disk drives that offer more storage capacity and better performance over previous models, they said Wednesday.

Both drives, Hitachi's Travelstar 7K100 series and Fujitsu's MHV2100BH, are 2.5-inch types and are available with a maximum capacity of 100GB.

Hitachi's new drives represent the company's second generation of notebook drives with a disk rotational speed of 7,200rpm. That's significantly faster than the 5,400rpm of most notebook drives and the same as most desktop drives. The faster speed means a boost to the drive's media transfer rate: Hitachi's drive offers an improvement of 25 percent over the most competitive 5,400rpm drive, according to the company's measurements.

Compared to Hitachi's first generation 7,200rpm drives, the new models offer several improvements, said John Osterhout, director of marketing of consumer electronics drives for the San Jose-based drive maker. These include a jump by about a quarter in the rate at which data is read from the drive due to higher areal density and an increase in the drive operating shock from 200G to 300G. The new drives are also slightly quieter.

Hitachi is already producing the drives at its factory in Thailand and shipping them to customers such as Dell (Profile, Products, Articles), which is offering them in its Inspiron XPS Gen 2 system, according to Hitachi. Dell's Web site offers a 100GB drive as an option on the machine but doesn't specify the maker or drive speed.

The drives are available with Parallel ATA or Serial ATA interfaces.

Fujitsu's new MHV2100BH drive family spins at 5,400rpm and is available in capacities between 40GB and 100GB. It has a Serial ATA interface and is also in volume production, according to the company.

Source.

More in Tux Machines

Games Leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • Julita Inca Chiroque: Parallel Computing Talk
  • Open Source Monitoring Conference: Speakers, Agendas, and Other Details
    One of today’s leading tech conferences, the Open Source Monitoring Conference (OSMC), is back to bring together some of the brightest monitoring experts from different parts of the world. The four-day event will be held at Holiday Inn Nuremberg City Conference in Germany starting today, November 21st, until November 24th.
  • Why a Dallas-area tech startup opened a KC office
  • Open education: How students save money by creating open textbooks
    Most people consider a college education the key to future success, but for many students, the cost is insurmountable. The growing open educational resource (OER) movement is attempting to address this problem by providing a high-quality, low-cost alternative to traditional textbooks, while at the same time empowering students and educators in innovative ways. One of the leaders in this movement is Robin DeRosa, a professor at Plymouth State University in New Hampshire. I have been enthusiastically following her posts on Twitter and invited her to share her passion for open education with our readers. I am delighted to share our discussion with you.

Android Leftovers

Linux 4.10 To Linux 4.15 Kernel Benchmarks

The ThinkPad X1 Carbon has been enjoying its time on Linux 4.15. In addition to the recent boot time tests and kernel power comparison, here are some raw performance benchmarks looking at the speed from Linux 4.10 through Linux 4.15 Git. With this Broadwell-era Core i7 5600U laptop with 8GB RAM, HD Graphics, and 128GB SATA 3.0 SSD with Ubuntu 17.10 x86_64, the Linux 4.10 through 4.15 Git mainline kernels were benchmarked. Each one was tested "out of the box" and the kernel builds were obtained from the Ubuntu Mainline Kernel archive. Read more