Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

A Less-Public Path to Changes In Antitrust

Filed under
Microsoft

Throughout Microsoft Corp.'s long-running defense against charges that it broke antitrust laws was an intriguing subtext: Technology industries are so new and different that many aspects of traditional antitrust law don't apply.

It's a thorny issue, one that Congress might even touch on when it considers a nominee to replace R. Hewitt Pate, who resigned this week as head the antitrust division at the Justice Department.

But as usual in today's Washington, the important decisions don't get ironed out in places as public as congressional hearings. Instead, significant revisions of U.S. antitrust law are being hashed out by a group composed mainly of lawyers who represent large companies.

And Microsoft -- found to be an illegal monopolist on two continents -- is likely to have some influential allies.

The work is being carried out by an organization called the Antitrust Modernization Commission. Created by Congress in 2002, the commission is examining a series of questions that challenge long-standing antitrust enforcement policies.

The head of the 12-member commission is Deborah A. Garza, a partner at Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson LLP in Washington. Garza's partner and close associate in the firm, Charles F. Rule, represents Microsoft in court proceedings that monitor the company's compliance with its consent decree with the Justice Department.

Also on the commission is John L. Warden, based in New York with the firm of Sullivan & Cromwell LLP. The gravelly-voiced Warden was Microsoft's lead outside attorney during much of its case.
Alan J. Meese, the commission's senior adviser and a law professor at William & Mary, wrote papers during the case arguing against the government's proposal to break up Microsoft into two companies.

For several months, the commission has been soliciting requests for topics to study and recommendations on the issues it decided to address. Actively participating in submitting suggestions is a task force of the American Bar Association led by Richard J. Wallis, an in-house Microsoft attorney who heads the ABA's antitrust section.

The issues the commission is tackling could have broad impact, and many are near and dear to Microsoft. Among them: Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS Delayed Until February 2, Will Bring Linux 4.8, Newer Mesa

If you've been waiting to upgrade your Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system to the 16.04.2 point release, which should have hit the streets a couple of days ago, you'll have to wait until February 2. We hate to give you guys bad news, but Canonical's engineers are still working hard these days to port all the goodies from the Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) repositories to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, which is a long-term supported version, until 2019. These include the Linux 4.8 kernel packages and an updated graphics stack based on a newer X.Org Server version and Mesa 3D Graphics Library. Read more

Calamares Release and Adoption

  • Calamares 3.0 Universal Linux Installer Released, Drops Support for KPMcore 2
    Calamares, the open-source distribution-independent system installer, which is used by many GNU/Linux distributions, including the popular KaOS, Netrunner, Chakra GNU/Linux, and recently KDE Neon, was updated today to version 3.0. Calamares 3.0 is a major milestone, ending the support for the 2.4 series, which recently received its last maintenance update, versioned 2.4.6, bringing numerous improvements, countless bug fixes, and some long-anticipated features, including a brand-new PythonQt-based module interface.
  • Due to Popular Request, KDE Neon Is Adopting the Calamares Graphical Installer
    KDE Neon maintainer Jonathan Riddell is announcing today the immediate availability of the popular Calamares distribution-independent Linux installer framework on the Developer Unstable Edition of KDE Neon. It would appear that many KDE Neon users have voted for Calamares to become the default graphical installer system used for installing the Linux-based operating system on their personal computers. Indeed, Calamares is a popular installer framework that's being successfully used by many distros, including Chakra, Netrunner, and KaOS.

Red Hat Financial News

Wine 2.0 RC6 released