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Reasons to adopt Linux – part 94

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Linux

BEAR WITH US as we write one more story on the whole ‘Is Windows more or less expensive to run than Linux?’ debate.

This one’s quite interesting – honest. Research company Computer Economics recently did a survey of Linux-using visitors to its website, to find out what their key motivation was in adopting open source. So it was lower costs, right? Well actually, not at all. Better security? Not even at the ball game. Reduced dependence on software vendors was top by far of the list of benefits. It’s not being shackled to the likes of Microsoft that floats most people’s boat, and explains why Apache is the world’s web server platform of choice.

Respondents were offered five possible advantages of open source and asked to prioritise them.

The five and their order of preference were:
Reduced dependence on software vendors – 44%
Lower total cost of ownership – 22%
Easier to customize – 18%
No advantage – 13%
Better security - 3%
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Source: theinquirer.

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