Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Novell starts stock option awards probe, makes third quarter loss

Filed under
SUSE

Former directors at both Brocade and Comverse are already facing stock option fraud charges brought by regulators and enforcement agencies, and other companies are conducting internal investigations into possible problems at their firms.

The Novell investigation has already impacted on Novell’s third quarter results posted this week.

The company said that “These financial results are preliminary because Novell, during this quarter, began a self-initiated, voluntary review of the company's historical stock-based compensation practices and related potential accounting impact. The financial results reported today do not take into account any adjustments that may be required in connection with the completion of the stock-based compensation review and should be considered preliminary.”

Federal investigators are looking at the stock option awards at dozens of US IT companies.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Chrome OS/Android Leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • Take your computer on the go with Portable Apps
    Portable Apps lets you access all your go-to apps anywhere, anytime—regardless of whether you are using your own computer or not. With more than 400 apps, 980 million downloads, and available in 55 languages, Portable Apps allows you to access your favorites via a USB flash drive, a cloud folder, or just about any portable storage device. Portable Apps is like having your computer without having your computer. Portable Apps is released under the GPL and MIT licenses, and it is compatible with Windows XP through 10, or Linux and MacOS via Wine or CrossOver. Developed by John T. Haller, a computer science major at Binghamton University and the developer of Portable Firefox, Portable Apps launched in November 2006 and has been in development since 2004. The current version, 15.0.2, was released on May 17, 2018. Plus, Portable Apps is supported by 200 volunteers and 220,000 community members.
  • 7 tips for promoting your project and community on Twitter
  • Software Heritage Archive Goes Live

    The importance of preserving software, and in particular open source software, is something I've been writing about for nearly a decade.

  • How Tech Enterprises Handle Big Data On Open Source And Ensure User Privacy
  • Cheaper textbooks and better access for higher ed students
    Recently at the Texas Linux Fest, Ross Reedstrom introduced me to OpenStax. I've heard of a lot of open educational resources (OER) but not this particular one. It's certainly a project I'm going to follow now. OpenStax was founded by Rice University engineering professor Richard Baraniuk in 1999 under the name Connexions. It started like most open source projects: To scratch an itch and address a problem. In this case, Rice University wanted to do something on the web related to education. A grad student suggested that they take the model used to develop Linux and apply it to create textbooks, and Connexions was born. They decided on a license that allowed for reuse with attribution—in essence, this was the first use of the Creative Commons license even before the license existed.
  • MIT to conduct an environmental scan of open source publishing
    The MIT Press has announced the award of a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to conduct a landscape analysis and code audit of all known open source (OS) authoring and publishing platforms. By conducting this environmental scan, the MIT Press will be providing a comprehensive and critical analysis of OS book production and hosting systems to the scholarly publishing community. As noted by Amy Brand, director of the MIT Press, “Open source book production and publishing platforms are a key strategic issue for not-for-profit scholarly publishers, and the wide-spread utilization of these systems would foster greater institutional and organizational self-determination. The MIT Press has long been a leader in digital publishing. We are very grateful for the generous support from The Mellon Foundation for this project.”

Microsoft, FOSS FUD, and Openwashing

Intel Chaos Looming?