Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

The Moon in your hands

Filed under

NASA has a developed a virtual Moon, much like Google Earth, that lets users zoom around three-dimensional visualizations of the terrain. Declan Butler talks to Patrick Hogan, manager of NASA's World Wind project, about the software.

World Wind Moon, released in October 2005, was made off the back of World Wind Earth. Was it hard to make the leap off this planet?

It was a piece of cake really. We got our hands on imagery and elevation data from NASA's [1994] Clementine mission. It was mostly a matter of processing all that, and georectifying the images with coordinate data to place them correctly. Then once you add in the elevation and terrain data, the user is able to navigate in three dimensions through the Moon terrain, just as in the Earth version. Most of the imagery is at 100-metre resolution, but about 10% is at 20-metre resolution. There are also shaded elevation data, provided by the US Geological Survey, which has different colours for elevation, so that the mares [lunar 'seas' of old lava floods] stand out against higher structures.

What's the most striking thing about the virtual Moon software?

Full Story.

This is great especially for

This is great especially for school use. Now students can see what the moon really looks like. From what I understand about the features, it can even show the different lunar phases, which is being taught in science subjects. It will show NASA landmarks and apollo landings, which are taught both in Science and History subjects. It's just like making a movie version of the book. This time it's textbooks. Students will pay more attention to what they're learning if they can visualize them. But maybe, this will be a great disappointment for the little ones; to discover that the moon is not really made of cheese. Smile

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • Kafka and syslog-ng
    First of all, let me introduce Kafka, a high-throughput distributed messaging system. It was originally developed by LinkedIn as a backbone of a website activity tracking infrastructure. Once open source, it was developed further under the umbrella of the Apache Foundation. In 2014 Confluent was founded to provide enterprise level support to Kafka users. Kafka is now used by major companies, including Netflix, Twitter and PayPal. There are now many more uses for Kafka: message queuing, log aggregation, stream processing or as a commit log.
  • Nmap 7.00 Has Been Released
    As you may know, Nmap is a command-line network exploration tool that supports ping scanning to determine the online hosts, port scanning techniques and TCP/IP fingerprinting for remote device identification.
  • Atom 1.2.4 Has Been Released
  • Vuze 5.7 (Open-Source BitTorrent Client) Has Been Released
  • Aptik 1.6.6 (Backup Software) Has Been Released
    As you may know, Aptik is an open-source application that enables the users to easily perform and restore backups of PPAs, aplications and packages in Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Elementary OS and other Ubuntu derivates.
  • Linphone 3.9.1 Brings Only Bug-Fixes
    As you may know, Linphone is an open-source VoIP service that allows the users to perform voice calls, video calls and text conversations with friends and other Linphone users.
  • Install QGifer 0.2.3 RC2 on Ubuntu
    Up to date packages are available via some third party PPA, so installing the software on Ubuntu 15.10 Wily Werewolf, Ubuntu 14.04 Trusty Tahr, Linux Mint 17.x, Elementary OS 0.3 Freya and other Ubuntu derivative systems is easy.
  • Wireshark 2.0 Has Been Released
    As you already know, Wireshark is an open-source protocol analyzer software, very used for monitoring the network traffic.
  • Kodi 16.0 Beta 2 “Jarvis” Brings Changes

today's howtos

Leftovers: Gaming

Krita 2.9