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Faulty M$ Update Rekindles Patch Quality Concerns

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Microsoft

For Microsoft, delivering high-quality security patches in a timely manner has always been a lose-lose predicament.

If patches for major software vulnerabilities take too long, customers are at the mercy of zero-day threats. When patches are rushed out without proper quality assurance testing, they invariably become a system administrator's worst nightmare.

Earlier this week, when Microsoft Corp. announced plans to re-release a "critical" bulletin because of patch quality problems, the move triggered a new round of eye-rolling among security research pros.

The bulletin, MS05-019, first released in April, contains patches that have caused major connectivity problems for network administrators.

The connectivity errors range from the inability of Exchange servers to talk to their domain controllers; failure of domain controller replication across WAN (wide area network) links; and inability to connect to terminal servers or to file share access.

Microsoft also acknowledged that networking programs that send TCP packets or UDP packets over raw IP sockets "may stop working" after the security update is applied on a computer running Windows XP SP1 (Service Pack 1).

A knowledge base article has been posted to highlight the problems, and hotfixes have been offered to provide temporary respite, but despite Microsoft's insistence that the problems affect only a small number of customers, security experts said the re-release of a high-severity bulletin points to a weakness in Microsoft's patch creation process.

"A hotfix for a patch? I hope it works properly, or what's next? A hotmend for the hotfix for the patch?" asked Corey Nachreiner, a network security analyst at WatchGuard Technologies Inc.

In an interview with Ziff Davis Internet News, Nachreiner said some of his company's clients have complained that the patches have broken VPN connections, a problem he described as "a big deal" for the SMB (small and medium-sized business) market segment.

Because the patch is rated critical by Microsoft, Nachreiner said he cannot recommend uninstalling the patch.

"It means that a lot of customers are scrambling to get hotfixes to keep their systems connected."

Officials at Microsoft insisted the company is doing "far more for this one than necessary" to help ensure every customer has the most recent changes to the update.

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