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PC-BSD Interview

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Interviews

PC-BSD is one of the newest additions to the BSD family. The focus for this project is to create a user-friendly desktop experience based on FreeBSD and it has quickly garnered attention from media and the community. Kris Moore founder and lead developer of PC-BSD took some time off to answer a few questions about the past and current state of the project in general and its relation to KDE in particular.

Can you tell us about the history of your distribution?

PC-BSD was initially released as 0.5 Beta about a year ago, April 2005. I chose to begin development with the goal of making a FreeBSD-based desktop OS, with a custom software installation method called PBI or PC-BSD Installer. Instead of a true "distro" with numerous ports or programs being apart of the base system, PC-BSD is by default a Operating System only. Software packages live independent of the operating system, self-contained in their own directories, where they do no harm or cause dependency issues.

Why did you choose KDE and which version of KDE did you first implement?

Full Story.

Okay

Just registered today and I don't know how to take a look at this.
Anonymo

oppps, sorry.

oppps, sorry. A little slip of the html. Blushing

Here Ya go and thank you so much.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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