Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Revolution confirmed for 2006; will play DVDs

Filed under
Gaming

Speaking to GameSpot several weeks ago about the imminent launch of the Xbox 360, Robbie Bach, Microsoft's chief Xbox officer and senior vice president, weighed in on the next-console race. He said he largely saw the next several years as a two-party conflict between Microsoft and Sony.

"Nintendo is good and cute...and there's nothing wrong with that," he said. "They'll be a competitor, but in a different category almost. I don't think they have the same ambition that either Sony or Microsoft does in the more mainstream interactive entertainment space."

Bach's words were presumably based on Nintendo's long-standing policy that game consoles should be for games, period. This philosophy was at the core of the company's current-generation console, the GameCube, which uses a proprietary three-inch disc format, versus the DVDs used by the PlayStation 2 and the current and next-gen Xboxes.

However, it appears that will soon change. In a statement on its official Web site, the company "stated loud and clear that [it is] not to be overlooked in the next-generation home console race." Nintendo announced that its new console, code-named the "Revolution," will play DVDs and be backward compatible. "Nintendo's legions of loyal fans will be happy to learn that Revolution will be backward compatible, playing both Nintendo GameCube three-inch discs, along with its own standard, double-layered DVD discs in the same self-loading media drive," said the company.

Speaking of DVDs, Nintendo also mentioned that the Revolution "will be about the thickness of three standard DVD cases and only slightly longer." This would make it the Japanese game giant's smallest console to date, as well as making it barely larger than Sony's new slimline PS2, which is about two times as thick and about an inch-and-a-half longer than a DVD case. Like the PS2 and the Xbox 360, the new Revolution will be able to lie on its side or stand on one end for horizontal or vertical display.

Unfortunately, Nintendo's statement, which appeared strategically timed to deflate some of the hype surrounding the Xbox 360's unveiling, had few other specific details. It reconfirmed details revealed in Nintendo president Satoru Iwata's 2005 Game Developers Conference keynote address. Namely, it reconfirmed that the Revolution will be "wireless Internet ready out of the box" and will be powered by an IBM CPU and an ATI GPU.

That said, the statement concluded with a tantalizing tease for Nintendo fans. "There's much more to Revolution that will be revealed over the coming months," it read, "but the combination of its compact size, wireless Internet, backward compatibility, quick start-up time, and quiet, low-power operation add up to the start of a great game system."

Nintendo also confirmed what has been long suspected...that the Revolution won't arrive until next year. The last line of the statement read, "Get ready for the Nintendo Revolution in 2006!"

By Tor Thorsen -- GameSpot.

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Gaming

SystemD and Linux (Kernel)

  • systemd ❤ meson
    After hearing good things about meson for a long time, I decided to take the plunge and started working on porting the build system of systemd to meson. In our case "build system" is really a system — 11.5k lines in configure.ac and two Makefile.am s. This undertaking was bigger than I expected. Even though I had the initial patch compiling most of the code after a weekend of work, it took another three weeks and 80 patches [1] to bring it to mergeable state. There are still minor issues outstanding, but the pull request has been merged, so I want to take the opportunity to celebrate and summarize my impressions about meson.
  • Systemd Lands Meson Build System Support
    Systemd can now be built with the Meson build system as an alternative to its traditional Make support.
  • Another Stable Update Released for the Linux 3.18 Kernel, Adds Many Improvements
    One day after announcing the release of the Linux 4.10.12, 4.9.24, and 4.4.63 kernels, Greg Kroah-Hartman informed the community about the availability of yet another maintenance update to the Linux 3.18 kernel series.
  • Kernel Developers Still Discussing Raising Linux's Compiler Requirements
    Linux kernel developers are still looking to raise the requirements of GCC for building the Linux kernel. It turns out some developers are still using GCC 4.1 for building the mainline Linux kernel, largely for MIPS and other niche architectures. Plus some developers still are using older GCC compiler releases for allegedly better compiler warnings. But at least in 2017 it's looking like there's some agreement on beginning to mandate later GCC 4.x compilers as a minimum for being able to build newer kernel releases.

Trying Out Nouveau's Accelerated Pascal Support With DRM-Next, Mesa 17.2-dev

One of the many features to look forward to with Linux 4.12 is the Nouveau DRM driver providing initial 3D/accelerated support for GeForce GTX 1050/1060/1070/1080 "Pascal" graphics cards. Here are some benchmarks of this open-source NVIDIA driver support for these latest-generation GPUs compared to the proprietary driver. Read more

Debian Shutting down public FTP services

  • Shutting down public FTP services
    After many years of serving the needs of our users, and some more of declining usage in favor of better options, all public-facing debian.org FTP services will be shut down on November 1, 2017. These are:
  • Debian closing off public FTP servers after many years online
    The official date for them to be shut down is November 1, 2017. They stated the reasons being that FTP servers have no support for caching or acceleration, they haven't used FTP in their installers for years and other understandable reasons.