Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Piece of Dealey Plaza fence goes up for auction

Filed under
Misc

Conspiracy theorists and collectors, take note: A section of fencing from the infamous grassy knoll in Dallas' Dealey Plaza is going up for auction.

The weather-beaten picket fence, along with its metal posts, goes on sale Sunday at the Lelands.com online auction house. Bidding on the fence from the scene of President Kennedy's Nov. 22, 1963 assassination runs through June 16.

"It's an iconic item, in a macabre sort of way," said Simeon Lipman, director of Americana at the Long Island-based auction house. "It's part of the American lexicon: the grassy knoll, the white picket fence."

The fence was rescued from the junk heap five years ago by Dealey Plaza tour guide Ronald D. Rice. When a construction crew began dismantling the fence to replace it in January 2000, Rice grabbed up four sections _ each about 70 inches long and 55 inches high _ and put them into storage.

When the storage payments weren't made, the fence was sold at public auction to current owner Daniel Moses of Duncanville, Texas, said Lipman. He approached Lelands last year about selling it off.

"This kind of took me aback," said Lipman. "I've seen some wacky stuff, but this takes the cake."

Although the section of fence is indisputably from the Dallas location, there are questions about whether it's the fence that was standing on Nov. 22, 1963. The curator at the Sixth Floor Museum overlooking Dealey Plaza says many of the fence's wooden pickets have been replaced over the years.

Lelands agrees that pickets snatched by souvenir hunters or ruined by the weather needed replacements, but maintains "the wooden cross members that make up the main frame and the metal posts are original and predate 1963."

Several of the pickets carrying JFK-related graffiti left by tourists, including the message, "Oswald Was Framed." Conspiracy theorists have long suggested a second gunman might have hidden behind the fence.

"We're not saying this is 100 percent original from 1963," Lipman said of the fence. "But there are certainly parts of the fence that are original."

The minimum opening bid for the fence is $5,000, although Lipman acknowledged he had no idea what kind of bidding might ensue. "It's impossible to say with such a unique item," he said.

LARRY McSHANE
Associated Press Writer

More in Tux Machines

Intel Sandy Bridge Gets A Surprise Boost From Linux 3.17

Besides the recent work to support OpenGL Geometry Shaders for Sandy Bridge in Mesa, users of Intel "Sandy Bridge" HD Graphics can also be thankful for the forthcoming Linux 3.17 kernel. Early testing of Linux 3.17 has revealed that for at least some Intel Sandy Bridge hardware are OpenGL performance improvements with the newer kernel code. Read more

Open Source Okavango14: The Heartbeat of the Delta

We can hear this heartbeat by listening to what the environment tells us through sensors and testing. I proposed that we build low cost sensors using open source hardware and software. In recent years there has been quite a disruption in computing ability as a result of the prevalence of smartphones. Increasingly small and powerful components and processors have created an opportunities that we would have never thought possible. One of the results of that is the single-board Raspberry Pi computer. Originally, the Raspberry Pi was created to enable students to learn hardware and software development. For the Okavango Wilderness Project, we are using them to take environmental readings and send those to us for inclusion into the Into The Okavango website. Jer will cover this more in his expedition post. We are using them to measure water temperature, pH, conductivity, total dissolved solids, salinity, and specific gravity. Read more

Kochi innovator Arvind Sanjeev makes Google Glass clone for Rs 4,500

Instead of commercializing the product and with the intention of contributing to the community, Sanjeev posted a blog explaining how his 'Smart Cap' can be built by anyone using opensource hardware such as a Rasberry Pi computer, an Arduino board and Android software. Read more

Alfresco Raises A Fresh $45M To Fuel Open-Source Enterprise Content Management

Alfresco, an open source, enterprise content management startup, is today announcing a new round of funding of $45 million — a Series D round that is more than twice as big as all of its previous rounds put together. The UK-based company competes against legacy services like Documentum (which was co-founded by one of Alfresco’s co-founders, John Newton) and Sharepoint to help large organisations manage their disparate document storage both in the cloud and on-premises, and also offer versioning control and other compliance requirements across mobile, PC and other devices. Alfresco will use the new funding to step its business up a gear, with new sales and marketing efforts, and moves into more cloud-based services that could see it competing more directly also against the likes of Dropbox, Box and Huddle. Read more