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Xbox buzz runs the gamut

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Gaming

You say potato, I say "poTAHto." You say the Xbox 360 is smokin', I say, it's okay, but nothing special.

Such is the wide range of commentary buzzing around the Internet about Microsoft's newest game console, unveiled during a taped MTV broadcast Thursday and expected to take center stage at next week's Electronic Entertainment Expo, or E3.

Game bloggers and players alike have been very vocal about the new Xbox since Thursday night, when they could first set eyes on the console and its much-touted high-definition picture display.
Although their passions lie with machines, gamers have been offering some very human feedback, calling the new Xbox everything from "ugly" to "smoking hot" and "a serious beast of a console."

But most, like CNET News.com reader Matthew Ford, are somewhere in between. He was particularly unimpressed by the commercial-heavy MTV unveiling that left him with some unanswered questions. "I didn't really hear any killer features or see any killer games," he wrote in response to a News.com article about the Xbox, adding that he still wants to know whether the console has backward compatible and how much it's going to cost.

"I own an Xbox and a PS2 right now, and I didn't see anything I'd want to give up those systems for," Ford continued. "My gut says Microsoft might have a real problem on its hands if people decide the current generation is 'good enough' and/or want to wait for Sony to respond with their feature set."

Twenty-year gamer and CNET News.com reader Christopher Hall posted an essay offering a mostly favorable perspective on the new console, but he did voice some concerns. He's pleased with the console's aesthetics and its wireless controllers and was "blown away" by its technical capability. But like others, he wasn't impressed game-wise and is reserving judgment on the backward compatibility.

Full Story.

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