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Does Freespire Inspire?

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Linux
Reviews

During last week's column, I made mention that for reasons seemingly beyond my control, I needed to install a new Linux distro on my main production machine. Since it was literally lying on my desk in the pile of stuff brought back from LinuxWorld, I chose to try Freespire. You may recall that I'd also mentioned I had a Fedora Core 5 disk in the same pile and that I had wished I'd installed that, instead of trying for a new learning experience.

Things have sort of tempered out a bit and I am not as eager to ditch Freespire 1.0 from this machine. But, I am saddened to say, that when the next free moment comes, I will be choosing another distro to run. What stymies me is the reason for the desire to shift away from Freespire: is it because Freespire is not a good distribution, or is it simply a matter of personal preference--is Freespire just too easy for a battle-hardened geek like me to comfortably use? If it's the latter, then maybe this distro does meet the needs of its target audience: the casual or slightly powered Windows user.

Without a doubt, this was one of the easy installation routines I have seen for quite some time in a Linux distro.

Full Story.

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