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Book Review : Beginning Google Maps Applications with PHP and Ajax

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Ask me what is one of the most useful feature on the net which will remain popular for times immemorial, come what may, and I will without an iota of doubt tell you that it is maps. That is right, maps were used in the bygone era to navigate from one place to another and maps are still relied upon in these modern times for charting out ones journeys. So it is no surprise that with the dawn of the Internet, the maps got transferred from the physical to the electronic medium. One of the most exciting projects which makes use of maps is the Google's Keyhole project now known commonly as Google Maps. What is unique about Google maps is that it mashes up satellite telemetric data with the maps and displays it in a web browser allowing a wide degree of user interaction. What is more, Google has released the Google maps API library to the public so that anybody can use it to create custom maps and display them online in a visually persuasive way.

A one of a kind book I have come across in recent times is the Google Maps Applications with PHP and Ajax from Novice to Professional co-authored by Michael Purvis, Jeffrey Sambells and Cameron Turner, published by APress.

I found it a really indepth book covering all the concepts related to implementing Google Maps. I felt the authors have really done their homework.

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