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Linux-enabled ThinkPad

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Linux

Lenovo and Novell have announced the industry's first Linux-based ThinkPad mobile workstations, which will run Novell's recently released SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 10 operating system. The workstations are based on Intel Centrino Duo mobile technology.

Julian Pienaar, ThinkPad brand manager for Lenovo South Africa, says this groundbreaking innovation is the result of a two-year research and development effort between Lenovo, Intel and Novell. At only an inch thin and just over 2 kg, the new Linux-supported ThinkPad T60p strikes the balance between productivity and portability, giving electronic design engineers the processor speeds and memory requirements necessary for industrial-strength applications such as computer aided design (CAD).

Whether working with a wired or wireless connection, users now have a secure platform for this traditionally desk-locked advanced design engineering.

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