Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Microsoft vs. Open Source: Who Will Win?

Filed under
Interviews

Want to get a heated debate going among technologists? Ask them this question: Can the open source software movement defeat (or severely cripple) Microsoft in the marketplace?

With little academic attention focused on this question, Harvard Business School professors Pankaj Ghemawat and Ramon Casadesus-Masanell decided to dive in. Most research to date into the OSS movement has focused on the organization and management issues surrounding OSS. Ghemawat and Casadesus-Masanell chose to explore the fundamental competitive dynamics question: Will OSS ever displace traditional software from its market leadership position?

"We believe that there is still a great deal of confusion and puzzlement on how this competitive battle will develop," say the authors of the academic paper Dynamic Mixed Duopoly: A Model Motivated by Linux vs. Windows, which has just been accepted for publication in a special issue of Management Science.

Ultimately, the authors believe, neither side is likely to be forced from the battlefield—Microsoft has too much market share and OSS offers too many benefits for users. But there are strategies each can use successfully against the other, as they detail in this e-mail interview.

Full Story.

Hmmm...

I've read the document on this analysis, and they make quite a number of assumptions in their model. Its simplified, and maybe downright wrong in the end. (we'll see in 5yrs to 10 yrs time).

One notable thing is that they don't consider the effect of shareholders if MS were to give their biggest money maker (Windows) out for free. How would Microsoft shareholders react? It also can't account for the unpredictability of the community itself.

Anyway, from experience in engineering problems, I know that models aren't always correct. They are always simplified to make the analysis much easier to deal with. When you don't account for a critical factor, it will dramatically skew results, which could lead to potentially wrong conclusions!

Although open source has

Although open source has gotten the attention of many, by catering directly to the needs and demands of users, they still have a long way to go. Miscrosoft has been leading in market shares for so long. Thought open source provides positive changes that target user benefits, people still hold on to familiarity. As Open Source continue to make improvements to further entice users, Microsoft is doing the same. It will take more than just offers of a few conveniences to replace microsoft in the markerplace.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

The Linux Kernel Is Still Rectifying The Year 2038 Problem

The Linux kernel is still working to rectify the Year 2038 problem whereby the time values stored as signed 32-bit integers will wrap around. If you somehow are not familiar with the Year 2038 "Y2038" problem, you can learn more via Wikipedia. The Linux kernel has been receiving fixes and workarounds for years now through many Y2038 commits to work through the many different areas of the kernel that are relying upon 32-bit signed ints for storing time values. With Linux 4.15, this work has continued. Read more

Linux 4.15 Is A Huge Update For Both AMD CPU & Radeon GPU Owners

Linux 4.15 is shaping up to be a massive kernel release and we are just half-way through its merge window period. But for AMD Linux users especially, the 4.15 kernel release is going to be rocking. Whether you are using AMD processors and/or AMD Radeon graphics cards, Linux 4.15 is a terrific way to end of the year. There are a number of improvements to make this release great for AMD customers. Read more

Announcing Season of KDE 2018

KDE Student Programs is pleased to announce the 2018 Season of KDE for those who want to participate in mentored projects that enhance KDE in some way. Every year since 2013, KDE Student Programs has been running Season of KDE as a program similar to, but not quite the same as Google Summer of Code, offering an opportunity to everyone (not just students) to participate in both code and non-code projects that benefits the KDE ecosystem. In the past few years, SoK participants have not only contributed new application features but have also developed the KDE Continuous Integration System, statistical reports for developers, a web framework, ported KDE Applications, created documentation and lots and lots of other work. For this year’s Season of KDE, we are shaking things up a bit and making a host of changes to the program. Read more

How To Get Started With The Ubuntu Linux Distro

The Linux operating system has evolved from a niche audience to widespread popularity since its creation in the mid 1990s, and with good reason. Once upon a time, that installation process was a challenge, even for those who had plenty of experience with such tasks. The modern day Linux, however, has come a very long way. To that end, the installation of most Linux distributions is about as easy as installing an application. If you can install Microsoft Office or Adobe Photoshop, you can install Linux. Here, we'll walk you through the process of installing Ubuntu Linux 17.04, which is widely considered one of the most user-friendly distributions. (A distribution is a variation of Linux, and there are hundreds and hundreds to choose from.) Read more