Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Countdown to Linux Desktops

Filed under
Linux

In a show of unity that is rare in the technology industry, nearly everyone has agreed that Linux is not ready for prime time when it comes to the average user in desktop deployment.

Although there is a certain wistful "if only" quality to the discussion, even major Linux vendors acknowledge that it will take some time before the penguin makes its way to the desktops of everyday users.

But how much time is difficult to predict. Although some analysts once projected that Linux would take decades to filter down from early adopters to average users, Linux vendors are tired of waiting, and are doing everything they can to speed up the adoption process.

The mass rollout of Linux to the desktop is pegged at between five and twenty years, depending on who is being asked, with many leaning toward the longer-term part of the range.

"Linux in the mainstream is a possibility, but we're not going to see it anytime soon," said Gartner analyst Michael Silver. "There's been a lot of hype about Linux coming to the desktop, but it's just not going to happen as fast as some people want it to."

Gartner released a report predicting that until 2008 at least, Linux would capture only a "tiny" percentage of the PC share.

Many others also are conservative in their time estimates about Linux desktops, but do see Linux momentum as potentially shortening the countdown.

"Linux itself has been ready for the desktop for years," said Mike Ferris, Red Hat's product marketing manager for Enterprise Linux. "It's just been waiting for the market to catch up."

Last year, the company decided to help the market along, and released Red Hat Desktop, aimed at less-technical users. As more products aimed at the front-office are released, companies will be able to implement Linux throughout the business, and that will speed adoption.

"I don't think it's going to take a decade before we see wider desktop adoption," said Ferris. "In fact, I think within the next five years, there'll be significant strides made."

It is possible that Linux never will overtake Windows, some analysts have said, but it is poised to overtake Apple in the not-too-distant future.

"Linux is no longer on the fringe, it's not a niche player anymore," said IDC analyst Dan Kusnetzky. "Within a few years, it should be the number two desktop operating system."

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3 Beta Adds NVDIMM Support, Improves Security

Today, August 25, 2016, Red Hat announced that version 7.3 of its powerful Red Hat Enterprise Linux operating system is now in development, and a Beta build is available for download and testing. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3 Beta brings lots of improvements and innovations, support for new hardware devices, and improves the overall security of the Linux kernel-based operating system used by some of the biggest enterprises and organizations around the globe. Among some of the major new features implemented in the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3 release, we can mention important networking improvements, and support for Non-Volatile Dual In-line Memory Modules (NVDIMMs). Read more Also: CentOS 6 Linux OS Receives Important Kernel Security Update from Red Hat Release of Red Hat Virtualization 4 Offers New Functionality for Workloads

Ubuntu 16.10 Beta 1 Released, Available to Download Now

The Ubuntu 16.10 Beta 1 releases are now available to download. You know the drill by now: {num} Ubuntu flavors, some freshly pressed ISOs, plenty of new bugs to find and no guarantees that things won’t go boom. Read more Also: Ubuntu 16.10 Beta Launches for Opt-in Flavors, Adds GCC 6.2 and LibreOffice 5.2

Games for GNU/Linux

PC-BSD Becomes TrueOS, FreeBSD 11.0 Reaches RC2

  • More Details On PC-BSD's Rebranding As TrueOS
    Most Phoronix readers know PC-BSD as the BSD operating system derived from FreeBSD that aims to be user-friendly on the desktop side and they've done a fairly good job at that over the years. However, the OS has been in the process of re-branding itself as TrueOS. PC-BSD has been offering "TrueOS Server" for a while now as their FreeBSD-based server offering. But around the upcoming FreeBSD 11.0 release they are looking to re-brand their primary desktop download too now as TrueOS.
  • FreeBSD 11.0-RC2 Arrives With Fixes
    The second release candidate to the upcoming FreeBSD 11 is now available for testing. FreeBSD 11.0-RC2 ships with various bug fixes, several networking related changes, Clang compiler fixes, and other updates. FreeBSD 11.0 is bringing updated KMS drivers, Linux binary compatibility layer improvements, UEFI improvements, Bhyve virtualization improvements, and a plethora of other work. Those not yet familiar with FreeBSD 11 can see the what's new guide.