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Mandriva aims for the enterprise

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Mandriva has been no stranger to trouble since the dot-com crash of 2001. Like many, the company went from crisis to crisis and Mandriva — then MandrakeSoft — filed for bankruptcy protection in early 2004. More recently it has faced increased competition with Suse Linux's acquisition by Novell and Red Hat's continuing growth, not to mention a new version of Windows coming on the horizon. On the consumer front, traditionally Mandriva's strong suit, Ubuntu has become the Linux flavour of choice.

Recent quarters have seen the company recovering, mainly as a result of relentless cost-cutting — the most recent round of layoffs claimed co-founder Gael Duval among others.

Now Mandriva is hoping a completely new product lineup will help change its fortunes and win more enterprise customers.

Following the launch of Corporate Server 4.0, ZDNet UK spoke to Mandriva chief executive François Bancilhon on how Mandriva plans to win over the enterprise.

Full Story.

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