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Use the source, Luke?

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Gentoo

This may appear as a bit of a conundrum, or at least the musings of a confused teenage mind in the body of a man in his thirties — but I love source-based distributions: the philosophy, the freedom, the configurability, and the closeness to the operating system one gets when using them.

I am, primarily, a Gentoo user though I’ve used more distributions that I care to count ever since Slackware came in floppy images and RedHat had its ‘RedHat Redneck’ install language — oh for shame RedHat, dropping this in favour of the corporate image? You’re no fun anymore!

I digress — though I love Gentoo, I also hate it with a vengeance. I’m not talking small time peeves here, like the way Krispy Kremes icing gets all over your fingers (and by extension, clothes). I’m talking the type of frustration that is expressed in multitudes of expletives, some of which would make the profinsaurus cry.

Why? Because, by definition and by nature, a source-based distribution is its own worst enemy.

Full Story.

Why does Gentoo frustrate

Why does Gentoo frustrate you? Aside fom requiring good internet connection and the slow installation, I know of no other faults. What about the portability and the speed? Don't they count for anything? You sound like someone who knows what he's talking about. So please shed some light on this. We want to know what we're missing.

re: gentoo frustrate

Shoot, I don't think you gonna get that author to come answer you here. But I'll tell you from someone who runs gentoo daily and has for the last 3 years, sometimes portage dependencies and ebuilds are broken causing headaches when updating. Although I did both machines this past weekend and it went really well this time. No major headaches this time. Smile

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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