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marijuana will remain legal in Alaska!

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Legal

Last September the Alaska Supreme Court upheld a previous ruling that allows adults aged 21 and older to use and possess up to four ounces of marijuana in the privacy of their homes -- and not just for medical use. The MPP grants program funded this litigation.

A few months ago, Alaska Gov. Frank Murkowski (R) declared that re-criminalizing marijuana would be one of his top legislative priorities this year. At his urging, the state legislature introduced twin bills to impose the same penalty for the possession of four ounces of marijuana as for incest -- five years in prison!

MPP fought back. Working with Alaskans for Marijuana Regulation and Control, we funded radio ads slamming the bills, called thousands of Alaska voters to get them to complain to their legislators, and, with the help of the Alaska Civil Liberties Union, lined up experts to testify before key committees. And we succeeded at ensuring that all newspapers in the state covered this public outcry.

After four months of hand-to-hand combat, the state legislature adjourned for the year without even coming close to passing the legislation. And, when the governor called the legislature back into session for the summer, he decided against putting the bad marijuana legislation on the legislature's docket.

Full Story.

Didn't know

I didn't even know it was legal up there in the first place. <shrugs>

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

Friend

I had a friend that moved up there and everytime I'd call and ask "Whatcha been doing?", he would say uhhh nothing man, just smoking weed! lolol

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