Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Is your boss monitoring your e-mail?

Filed under
Misc

If you're working for a U.S. company, there's a good chance you're being watched--and you may get fired for how you use your computer or office phone.

That's the gist of a study on electronic monitoring and surveillance released Wednesday by the American Management Association and the ePolicy Institute.

The report found that companies increasingly are "putting teeth in technology policies." About a quarter of employers have fired workers for misusing the Internet; another 25 percent have terminated employees for e-mail misuse; and 6 percent have fired employees for misusing office telephones, according to the report.

"Concern over litigation and the role electronic evidence plays in lawsuits and regulatory investigations has spurred more employers to implement electronic technology policies," Nancy Flynn, executive director of the ePolicy Institute, said in a statement.
Although liability and regulatory issues may be convincing companies to peek in on their employees, such surveillance raises privacy concerns. Employers can monitor workers to a greater degree these days, thanks to newer technologies such as keystroke-logging software and satellite global positioning systems that can track a cell phone user's whereabouts.

The survey, which involved 526 U.S. companies, found that 5 percent use GPS technology to monitor cell phones and 8 percent use GPS to track company vehicles. About 75 percent of companies monitor workers' Web site connections, and 65 percent use software to block connections to inappropriate Web sites.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Radeon Linux OpenGL Driver Continues Giving Its Best Against Windows 10

With having around a Windows 10 installation this week for the latest Windows 10 WSL vs. Linux benchmarking, I also carried out some fresh benchmarks of the Radeon gaming performance between Windows 10 and Ubuntu Linux using the very latest drivers on each platform. This time around a Radeon RX 580 and RX Vega 64 were used for this benchmarking. Read more

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) Daily Builds Now Fuelled by Linux Kernel 4.15

The Ubuntu Kernel team promised at the beginning of the development cycle for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Canonical's seventh long-term supported Ubuntu release to receive security and software update for the next five years, that they target the Linux 4.15 kernel series for the operating system. Linux 4.15 had one of the longest development cycles in the history of kernels for GNU/Linux distributions, due to the numerous patches to mitigate the nasty Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities for 64-bit architectures. It finally arrived at the end of January, so it took a month for Ubuntu Kernel team to implement it. Read more Also: Linux 4.15 Kernel Is Now The Default In Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Canonical Releases Major Kernel Security Update for Ubuntu 14.04 to Fix 26 Flaws

A total of 26 security flaws were fixed in today's kernel update for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS systems and derivatives, including an out-of-bounds write vulnerability in Linux kernel's F2F (Flash-Friendly File System) file system, a use-after-free flaw in Linux kernel's ALSA PCM subsystem, and an integer overflow in Linux kernel's sysfs interface for the QLogic 24xx+ series SCSI driver. Additionally, the kernel update addresses a use-after-free vulnerability in Linux kernel's SCTP protocol implementation, as well as a race condition in the LEGO USB Infrared Tower driver and a use-after-free vulnerability in the USB serial console driver, both allowing a physically proximate attacker to execute arbitrary code or crash the system with a denial of service attack. Read more