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  • Transit Route Planning Is Coming to GNOME Maps
  • GNOME Shell & Mutter Up To 3.24 Beta State

    GNOME Shell 3.23.90 and Mutter 3.23.90 are now available for testing, which represents the component's release for the GNOME 3.24 beta.

    With tonight's GNOME Shell 3.23.90 release is handling Ctrl+Q and Ctrl+W in portal windows, reloading of apps when the .desktop file contents change, fixing for sub-surfaces not showing up in previews, kill-switch has been added for user extensions, and a nightlight indicator has been added to the status area. There have also been a number of bug fixes to the GNOME Shell as it gets ready for the GNOME 3.24.0 release in March.

  • GNOME 3.24 Beta Released

    GNOME 3.23.90, a.k.a. the GNOME 3.24 beta, is now available for testing ahead of this big desktop update due out in late March.

  • GNOME 3.24 Desktop Environment Enters Beta, Final Release Is Coming March 22

    With a one-day delay, the Beta release of the upcoming GNOME 3.24 desktop environment is finally here, available for public testers who want to get an early taste of its new features.

    Of course, GNOME 3.24 Beta can't be called a feature-full release, as some things are yet to be implemented, such as the return routes and transit routing planning functionalities of the Maps app that we've discussed earlier, but it comes with enough changes to please the eye.

  • Outreachy Applications Now Open For Their 2017 Summer Internships

    For those eligible, Outreachy is accepting applications for their summer 2017 internship period if you wish to get paid while getting involved with open-source software.

More in Tux Machines Open-Source Platform Speeds Development, Requirements Process

IT development in the federal government has earned its reputation for being a painfully slow process but, the government’s cloud application platform, is helping to change that by standardizing the application lifecycle and helping to document it every step of the way. The need to document the entire stack of an IT solution in the federal government can run up to 1,000 pages, and that process requires in depth knowledge of thousands of pages of regulations, laws and risk management policies. Typically, federal agencies have compliance experts who must review this documentation and grant approval or request changes. This can take six to 14 months to get authority to operate (ATO), and then you still need to deploy the application. Read more Also: Hortonworks’ Shaun Bierweiler: Open Source Software to Help Advance Federal IT Modernization

Today in Techrights

Developer survey shows Linux as more popular than Windows

Every year since 2010, Stack Overflow conducts a developer survey where they ask the developer community about everything from their favorite technologies to their job preferences. The results of the eighth annual survey, held in January 2018, are out and not surprisingly, this year marks the largest number of respondents ever. Over 100,000 developers took the 30-minute survey revealing how they learn new technologies, which tools they use to get their work done, and what they look for while hunting some job. Read more

Ubuntu Preps to Remove Qt 4 Support from the Archives, Target Ubuntu 19.04

With Qt 5 being largely adopted by Qt application developers and other major projects, such as the KDE Plasma desktop environment, the Qt 4 technologies are becoming obsolete, so more and more GNU/Linux distributions plan its complete removal from the software repositories. Debian Project's Qt/KDE teams are already preparing to remove Qt 4 support from the repositories of the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" operating system series mainly because it's getting harder and harder to maintain it now that it is no longer supported upstream, and may cause lots of problems system-wide. Read more