Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Doom Comes to Wireless Phones

Filed under
Gaming
Sci/Tech

Jamdat Mobile announced at the E3 Expo in Los Angeles that it has acquired the rights to a wireless version of the popular videogame Doom from game maker id Software. The company will develop and release the game to coincide with the release of a motion picture version of Doom.

The original version of the game was launched back in 1994, and quickly became a cult favorite among early PC gamers. At the time, the game was considered revolutionary as it was the first game to use advanced graphics and started the genre of first-person shooting games.

"Doom is a legendary gaming franchise. By designing a new version of this classic specifically for mobile phones, John Carmack and the team at id Software have established a new and exciting milestone for online gaming," Mitch Lasky, CEO of Jamdat Mobile said in prepared remarks.

The game takes the player to a martian research facility to eradicate a plague of demonic monsters. Players will be able to use the weapons that made the original game famous, including the Pinky Demon and the Imp.

The game's availability will depend on the users phone and carrier. Jamdat says those interested in the game can find out more information at their Web site to see if their phone and carrier are compatible.

Source.

More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation and Linux

openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get Git 2.11, Xfce 4.12.3, FFmpeg 3.2.1 & Mesa 13.0.2

openSUSE's Douglas DeMaio reports on the latest Open Source and GNU/Linux technologies that landed in the repositories of the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system. Read more

What Is A VPN Connection? Why To Use VPN?

We all have heard about VPN sometime. Most of us normal users of internet use it. To bypass the region based restrictions of services like Netflix or Youtube ( Yes, youtube has geo- restrictions too). In fact, VPN is actually mostly used for this purpose only. ​ Read
more

The Libreboot C201 from Minifree is really really really ridiculously open source

Open source laptops – ones not running any commercial software whatsoever – have been the holy grail for free software fans for years. Now, with the introduction of libreboot, a truly open source boot firmware, the dream is close to fruition. The $730 laptop is a bog standard piece of hardware but it contains only open source software. The OS, Debian, is completely open source and to avoid closed software the company has added an Atheros Wi-Fi dongle with open source drivers rather than use the built-in Wi-Fi chip. Read more