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Doom Comes to Wireless Phones

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Gaming
Sci/Tech

Jamdat Mobile announced at the E3 Expo in Los Angeles that it has acquired the rights to a wireless version of the popular videogame Doom from game maker id Software. The company will develop and release the game to coincide with the release of a motion picture version of Doom.

The original version of the game was launched back in 1994, and quickly became a cult favorite among early PC gamers. At the time, the game was considered revolutionary as it was the first game to use advanced graphics and started the genre of first-person shooting games.

"Doom is a legendary gaming franchise. By designing a new version of this classic specifically for mobile phones, John Carmack and the team at id Software have established a new and exciting milestone for online gaming," Mitch Lasky, CEO of Jamdat Mobile said in prepared remarks.

The game takes the player to a martian research facility to eradicate a plague of demonic monsters. Players will be able to use the weapons that made the original game famous, including the Pinky Demon and the Imp.

The game's availability will depend on the users phone and carrier. Jamdat says those interested in the game can find out more information at their Web site to see if their phone and carrier are compatible.

Source.

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