Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Doom Comes to Wireless Phones

Filed under

Jamdat Mobile announced at the E3 Expo in Los Angeles that it has acquired the rights to a wireless version of the popular videogame Doom from game maker id Software. The company will develop and release the game to coincide with the release of a motion picture version of Doom.

The original version of the game was launched back in 1994, and quickly became a cult favorite among early PC gamers. At the time, the game was considered revolutionary as it was the first game to use advanced graphics and started the genre of first-person shooting games.

"Doom is a legendary gaming franchise. By designing a new version of this classic specifically for mobile phones, John Carmack and the team at id Software have established a new and exciting milestone for online gaming," Mitch Lasky, CEO of Jamdat Mobile said in prepared remarks.

The game takes the player to a martian research facility to eradicate a plague of demonic monsters. Players will be able to use the weapons that made the original game famous, including the Pinky Demon and the Imp.

The game's availability will depend on the users phone and carrier. Jamdat says those interested in the game can find out more information at their Web site to see if their phone and carrier are compatible.


More in Tux Machines

Learning The Linux File System

Before we get started, let’s avoid any confusion. There are two meanings to the term “File System” in the wonderful world of computing: First, there is the system of files and the directory structure that all of your data is stored in. Second, is the format scheme that is used to write data on mass storage devices like hard drives and SSD’s. We are going to be talking about the first kind of file system here because the average user will interact with his or her file system every time they use a computer, the format that data is written in on their storage devices is usually of little concern to them. The many different file systems that can be used on storage is really only interesting to hardware geeks and is best saved for another discussion. Now that that’s cleared up, we can press on. (Read the rest at Freedom Penguin)

today's howtos

Red Hat and Fedora

FreeNAS 10 Enters Alpha, Brings Lots of New Technologies, Based on FreeBSD 10.2

FreeNAS' Jordan Hubbard was proud to announce the other day, October 8, the release and immediate availability for download of the first Alpha build of the upcoming FreeNAS open source Network Attached Storage (NAS) solution. Read more