Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

BSA slams lack of action over piracy

Filed under
Misc

The Business Software Alliance (BSA) urged the UK government on Wednesday to take tougher action against copyright violation to combat the spiralling rate of unlicensed software.

The trade group, which counts Adobe, Apple and Microsoft among its members, commissioned analyst firm IDC to carry out a study of software use within businesses. The study found the value of unlicensed software in the UK had increased from £820m in 2003 to £1bn in 2004, although the proportion of such software declined over the same period from 29 to 27 per cent of all software in use.

Siobhan Carroll, a BSA regional manager, said in a statement: "The level of software piracy remains unacceptably high."

Despite the percentage decline in the ratio of unlicensed software, the BSA claimed it was important the UK government take tougher action against intellectual property violations by implementing the Intellectual Property Rights Enforcement Directive. This Directive, which was adopted by the EU in April 2004, requires all member states to apply "effective, dissuasive and proportionate remedies and penalties against those engaged in counterfeiting and piracy", according to a statement on the EU website. Member states have two years to adopt the directive's provisions into national law.

The BSA said: "[We are] now urging the government to follow through its pledge. It has a responsibility with its presidency of the EU to implement the Enforcement Directive in the UK and set a standard to other members of the EU, many of which have an even higher piracy rate."

But Ross Anderson, the chair of the Foundation for Information Policy Research and a professor at Cambridge University, dismissed the study as 'scaremongering'. Anderson claimed that the BSA is focusing on the issue of unlicensed software as a decoy, while companies are actually more likely to use the enforcement directive to crack down on legal activities such as grey market trading.

Grey market trading is a legal form of trading where companies or individuals circumvent the authorised channels of distribution to sell goods at a lower price than intended by the manufacturer in a certain market. For example, a company may take advantage of a software vendor setting particularly high prices for its products in one country by reselling legitimate copies purchased in a market where the manufacturer has priced them lower.

Anderson said: "What companies object to isn't counterfeiting but grey marketing. Counterfeiting is a complete distraction - it's not what this is about. [The directive] is an assault on free trade."

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Dawn of the data center operating system
    How microservices architecture and Linux containers will tame distributed computing for developers and ops
  • 30 Sys Admins to Follow on SysAdmin Day
    Systems administrators: They keep our high-tech world up and running. From capacity planning, to 3 a.m. phone calls, to retiring that 10-year-old server that uses more power than your whole house, sys admins do it all. Open source communities would not be able to thrive without the networks, services, and tools that allow for communication and collaboration, and sys admins are the ones who work thanklessly year-round to keep them going. July 31 is System Administrator Appreciation Day, a day for all of us to express our undying gratitude for sys admins. Sure, you could buy your favorite sys admin cake and ice cream, or perhaps a nice gift card. You could even go as far as not breaking the server for just one day. You also can follow these 30 sys admins.
  • See What Systemd 223 Brings New
  • Sparkfun's pcDuino Acadia Benchmarks Against Other ARM SBCs
    Sparkfun's pcDuino Acadia os a $119 USD development board powered by a Freescale i.MX6 quad-core Cortex-A9 SoC with Mali 400 graphics. There's 1GB of RAM and other connectivity options for this board.
  • Linux Based Solus OS Now Boots in Flat 1.2 Seconds
    Solus OS is a Linux distro that was built from scratch and uses a new desktop environment called Budgie. You can consider it as the next version of the Solus OS as it was built by the same developer team, so they didn’t bother changing the name for a new operating system.
  • Arch Linux 2015.08.01 Has Been Released. Upgrade Now!
    Arch Linux 2015.08.01 has been released and is powered by Kernel 4.1 and includes all the update patches since the 1st of July 2015.
  • uReadIt 3 – The Best Reddit Client For Ubuntu Touch
    As you may know, uReadIt is an open-source Reddit client for Ubuntu Touch, being one of the best native apps for Ubuntu mobile.
  • You Can Now Watch Flash Content With MPV On Ubuntu
    As you may know, Adobe Flash is not the safest thing on the internet this days. Mozilla even disabled it from the Firefox browser a while, due to the vulnerabilities found lately.
  • Ubuntu MATE 15.04 Running on the Rikomatic MK808B
    Ubuntu MATE, the latest member of the Ubuntu family, has been spotted running on the MK808B Plus Quad-Core mini TV box device. The device runs with Android 4.4 by default, but a third party developer has tweaked it to run Ubuntu.
  • LEGO Smart Home
    We spoke to Bhavana Srinivas and Geremy Cohen from PubNub about their LEGO Smart Home model, a proof of concept project that shows how you can use the Raspberry Pi with communication platform PubNub in order to automate your household electronics and other Internet of Things devices. You can read the full piece in the latest issue.
  • Compact module runs Linux on quad-core Braswell
    Congatec announced a compact, low power computer-on-module based on Intel’s 14nm “Braswell” SoCs, and featuring triple display outputs, and up to 4K video.

Leftovers: Software

today's howtos

Leftovers: Gaming