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A mini Linux PC for less than $100

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Linux

A Taiwanese hardware manufacturer is shipping a Linux powered PC (code named TU-40) for just (US)$99. The specification of the PC is modest and it runs with 128 MB RAM and has a 200 MHz processor. The company claims this is enough power to run lightweight GNU/Linux distributions.

More Here and Here.

From KDE to karaoke: five things to do with a sub-$100 PC

Intel’s rush to cram more cores onto a processor than you’ll find in an orchard filled with apples means its older releases are suddenly becoming a hell of a lot cheaper, and as a result the whole CPU industry is cutting prices.

That in turn means that it’s increasingly becoming possible to produce basic PCs with a price tag of under $100, assuming that you already have a few input peripherals lying around and are happy with a stripped-back Linux implementation such as Puppy or Damn Small Linux.

How might a sub-$100 PC change the world? Here’s APC’s ideas for what such a PC could be used for; naturally, we’d welcome other suggestions.

From KDE to karaoke: five things to do with a sub-$100 PC.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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