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KDE Plans

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KDE
  • Plasma Team Discusses Web-browser integration, Bundled Apps and new Features

    In February, KDE's Plasma team came together in for their yearly in-person meeting. The meeting was kindly hosted by von Affenfels GmbH, a webdesign agency in Stuttgart, Germany. The team discussed a wide variety of topics, such as design, features new and old, bugs and sore points in the current implementation, app distribution, also project management, internal and outward-facing communication and Wayland.

  • KDE Plasma Planning Browser Integration, Possible Touchpad Gestures

    Key developers of KDE's Plasma team met last month in Stuttgart. More details on this Plasma developer meeting have now come to light.

    KDE Plasma developers continue eyeing Flatpak, Snap, and AppImage for possible next-generation packaging solutions. The developers also discussed better browser integration within Plasma to have native notifications and download progress, better multimedia handling, and more. Another new feature discussed was touchpad gestures support to control the window manager.

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