Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Bluewhite64 Linux 11.0 released

Filed under
Linux

Announcing Bluewhite64 Linux 11.0 !

http://www.bluewhite64.com

This is the first Bluewhite64 Linux stable release after a 5 months of
development and maintenance !
Thanks to all who helped make this release possible!

Bluewhite64 11.0 includes the Linux 2.6.17.13 kernel(2.6.18 kernel in
the testing/ directory) with support for IDE, SATA, SCSI and RAID
controllers. Also, supports GCC 3.4.6 and Glibc 2.3.6 with NPTL (Native
POSIX Thread Library), Ext2, Ext3, ReiserFS, XFS and IBM`s SGI
filesystems, six window managers including the latest KDE 3.5.4 and XFce
4.2.3.2, updated development tools, the Subversion version control
system, the Mozilla Firefox browser and Mozilla Thunderbird 1.5.0.7
email and news client, Apache 1.3.7 webserver with php-4.4.4 (php-5.1.6
in extra/ directory), Mysql 5.0.24a and much more.

For a complete list of changes since Bluewhite64 11.0-rc5, check out the
Bluewhite64 11.0 Changelog page at:

http://www.bluewhite64.com/page.php?11

Read the official announcement at http://bluewhite64.com/page.php?9

If you want to support the Bluewhite64 Linux project development, you
can make a small donation using this link:

http://store.bin-sh.ro/bluewhite64

You can download CD and DVD ISO images using the primary mirror:

ftp://mirror.inode.at/bluewhite64

or choose one from the GetBluewhite64 page at

http://bluewhite64.com/page.php?5

This release brings 5 install CD ISO images and one DVD ISO image.

CD ISO`s content:
* install CD #1 - first bootable installation disk
(A, AP, D, E, K, L, N, TCL, X, XAP and Y software series,
isolinux/ and kernels/ directories);
* install CD #2 - second install CD (F, KDE, KDEi, T software series);
* install CD #3 - third install CD
(extra/, pasture/, testing/ and source/ part one directories);
* install CD #4 - source part two;
* install CD #5 - source part tree.

Enjoy using Bluewhite64 Linux !

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Gaming

Red Hat Financial News

Leftovers: OSS

  • EMC prioritizes open-source integration
    Josh Bernstein, EMC’s new VP of technical strategy, sat down with Stu Miniman and Brian Gracely, cohosts of theCUBE, from the SiliconANGLE Media team, during EMC World to talk about the value open source brings to EMC.
  • 10 Tips for Coding with Open Source Software
    Bootstrap is a framework to help you design websites faster and easier. It includes HTML and CSS based design templates for typography, forms, buttons, tables, navigation, modals, image carousels, etc. It also gives you support for JavaScript plugins.
  • Cisco Pushes Forward with Open-Source Strategy [VIDEO]
    For the last year, Lauren Cooney has been running open source strategy for the Chief Technology and Architecture Office at Cisco. Cooney's career includes time spent at some of the biggest IT vendors in the world, including Microsoft as well as rival networking vendor Juniper, but the Cisco experience for her is a bit different, especially in terms of open source. In a video interview, Cooney discusses why Cisco is investing in open source and how it determines whether a project can work on Github alone, or if it needs a broad foundation to support it.
  • NPV Considerations for Open Source Big Data Technologies
    Mention the words “open source” and all kinds ideas probably come to mind such as “free”, “agility”, and “speed”. However, with any IT project, it is important to look at business benefits vs. costs in a manner that goes beyond generalizations. One method for benefit-cost analysis for open source big data projects is Net Present Value (NPV). It’s not unusual to find the IT community excited about the possibilities of open source. And with good reason as adoption of open source big data technologies may provide companies flexibility in charting their own path, ability to innovate faster and move at the speed of business. And yet, it is sage advice to temper some of the frenzy in adopting open source with a financial analysis.
  • Demystifying Containers for a Better DevOps Experience
  • Break scalability barriers in OpenFlow SDN
    Over the past couple of years, software-defined networking (SDN) has emerged as a strong alternative to traditional networking approaches in the areas of WAN, data center networks, and network overlay solutions. The primary benefit realized from SDN, besides open networking, is the ability to accelerate service deployments. SDN solutions using OpenFlow tackle complex problems, including dynamic provisioning, interconnection, and fault management. Although the functionality of SDN has evolved and matured, the scalability of SDNs based on OpenFlow has been limited by OpenFlow’s ties to ternary content-addressable memory (TCAM). OpenFlow by design was implemented in the TCAM.
  • Open-source project lets players experience Fallout 4 in VR
    This week, Fallout 4 players will finally be able to experience post-apocalyptic Boston firsthand, thanks to the VR capabilities of the Oculus Rift. However, this isn’t an official patch released by Bethesda; instead, the functionality is being offered up by a third-party, open-source project called Vireio Perception.
  • MapR Delivers Free Streaming Data Analytics Training
  • UPSat, an open-source Greek satellite
    As part of this mission UPsat is equipped with a specialized scientific instrument (mNLP) designed for its mission needs. Every other component of the satellite is designed from scratch, built, tested and integrated by engineers, scientists and developers of the University of Patras and Libre Space Foundation. That includes the structural framework, the on board mission control computer, the telecommunications system, the power management system and the software that runs across all different subsystems.
  • Distributed tracing — the most wanted and missed tool in the micro-service world.
    We, as engineers, always wanted to simplify and automate things. This is something in our nature. That’s how our brains work. That’s how procedural programming was born. After some time, the next level of evolution was object oriented programming. The idea was always the same. Take something big and try to split it into isolated abstractions with hidden implementations. It is much easier to think about complex system using abstractions. It is way more efficient to develop isolated blocks.

Rugged IoT gateway runs Linux on Atom

Axiomtek’s rugged, Atom E3815-based “ICO300-MI” IoT gateway features Wind River Intelligent Device Platform XT v3.1, and operates over -20 to 70°C. We missed Axiomtek’s ICO300-MI gateway the first time around, but the company has now relaunched the product to promote the addition of Intel IoT Gateway Technology and the Linux-based Wind River Intelligent Device Platform XT v3.1. The latter is a middleware stack based on Wind River Linux that offers secure IoT device management and data aggregation services. Read more