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Fabrice Facorat: Reply to the FUD about Linux ready for Desktop

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How sad it is to see when people in the OpenSource community are doing so much FUD and people are jumping as the Panurge's sheeps. What ? I'm talking about Distrowatch which sems to compete for the FUD of the year. I can't believe that someone is doing something like this Sad This make me have doubts about some of the distrowatch journalism ethical/moral code. So here are my clarifications :

I'M NOT A MANDRIVA EMPLOYEE. I'm working as Sysadmin in a company doing fiscal business. ALL ( yes I said ALL ) computers ( servers and workstation ) are under Linux and more precisely Mandriva. Even the laptops are under Linux. I'm just a contributor.

This was my PERSONAL OPINION on my PERSONAL BLOG, and so this doesn't reflect Mandriva opinion. On top of that the blog was edited under the general Linux topic and not the Mandriva topic.

In this famous blog entry I never mention Mandriva.

Full Post.

In case you missed Vincent's: Feeding the frenzy of misinterpretation.

re: soap opera

Someone apparently thinks people actually read and care about all these little personal soap opera's.

News flash - they don't.

//Blogging - the CB Radio of the 21st century.

re: soaps

Well, apparently they do. It was of big interest in this week's DWW and the links to the responses are being clicked. Sorry, if it's not up to standard for content.

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

re: re: soaps

Didn't mean to sound like my comment was directed at Tuxmachines - you're doing a great job (article variety is a good thing)

Unlike the players involved in the article - this was the first I heard of their earth shaking scandal.

My comment was an attempt to put things in perspective (that being that although the players are "in a frenzy" pretty much the rest of the world some how seems to be blissfully unaware and uncaring).

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