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Thursday, 30 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 30/03/2017 - 9:43pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 30/03/2017 - 9:42pm
Story Linux Mint May Switch to LightDM Login Screen Roy Schestowitz 30/03/2017 - 9:35pm
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 30/03/2017 - 9:04pm
Story Tizen and Android Roy Schestowitz 30/03/2017 - 9:03pm
Story Linux and Linux Foundation Roy Schestowitz 30/03/2017 - 9:01pm
Story Mesa and Intel Graphics Roy Schestowitz 30/03/2017 - 9:00pm
Story RadeonSI OpenGL vs. RADV Vulkan Performance For Mad Max Roy Schestowitz 30/03/2017 - 8:56pm
Story Ubuntu 17.04: A mouse-sized step forward Rianne Schestowitz 30/03/2017 - 6:56pm
Story Quad-core Atom thin client offers hardened ThinLinux Rianne Schestowitz 30/03/2017 - 6:53pm

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • This Simple App Makes it Easy to Use Emoji on Linux

    If you read around these parts with any frequency you’ll know that I love using emoji.

    Often I need to quickly find and enter emoji in a desktop app a moments notice.

    Be it a well timed cheeky grin or a totally inappropriate aubergine glyph, emoji rely on context, and in real-time conversations context changes fast.

  • Pext is an extendable Python-based tool that’s hard to explain

    I don’t like to write about things I am not confident or experienced in using. This is why don’t see listicles about Vim, op-ed’s about DevOps, and so on.

    But writing about a desktop application should be within my abilities¹ — but I’ve been finding it difficult to know how to cover an app called Pext.

  • Peering into complex, tiny structures with 3D analysis tool tomviz

    New open source software tomviz—short for tomographic visualization—enables researchers to interactively understand large 3D datasets. More specifically, the software analyzes 3D tomographic data similar to a medical CT-scan but at the nanoscale.

    "When you can take a nanoparticle or biomolecule and spin it around, slice it, look inside it, and quantitatively analyze it, you get a complete picture from all angles," says Yi Jiang, a physics Ph.D. candidate at Cornell University.

  • Avidemux 2.6.19 Open-Source Video Editor Improves HEVC and 10Bit Support, More

    The developers of the Avidemux open-source video editor software for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows operating systems announced the availability of Avidemux 2.6.19, a new maintenance update that adds various improvements.

    If you're wondering, there was no Avidemux 2.6.18 update released, and it looks like Avidemux 2.6.19 comes almost three months after the small 2.6.17 bugfix update that only allowed E-AC3 for MP4/MP4v2 streams and fixed a handful of bugs for the Preview component.

  • Steinberg brings VST to Linux, and does other good things

    The days of Linux being a barren plug-in desert may at last be over. And if you’re a developer, there are some other nice things happening to VST development on all platforms.

    Steinberg has quietly rolled out the 3.6.7 version of their plug-in SDK for Windows, Mac, iOS, and now Linux. Actually, your plug-ins may be using their SDK even if you’re unaware – because many plug-ins that appear as “AU” use a wrapper from VST to Apple’s Audio Unit. (One is included in the SDK.)

  • GNOME 3.26 Release Date Set

    The GNOME 3.26 release date is set for September 13, 2017.

    That’s the date listed in the full GNOME 3.26 release schedule, though is still subject to change (bugs don’t adhere to deadlines, after all).

    Over the coming 6 months GNOME developers will work on honing, improving and revising the hugely popular open-source desktop environment.

  • Qt Creator 4.3 Enters Beta, Integrates a QML Code Editor into Qt Quick Designer

    The Qt Company, through Eike Ziller, announced today the availability of the Beta release of the upcoming Qt Creator 4.3 open-source and cross-platform IDE (Integrated Development Environment) for Qt application developers.

    Qt Creator 4.3 promises to be a major release adding some very exciting changes, starting with the integration of a QML code editor into the Qt Quick Designer component to allow developers to use the Properties editor or the Navigator views, among many others, also for text-based editing.

Linux Mint May Switch to LightDM Login Screen

Filed under
Ubuntu

Linux Mint 18.2 may ship with LightDM and Unity Greeter by default, replacing the current MDM login screen.

Developers behind the popular Ubuntu-derivative say they’ve ‘been testing [LightDM] as an alternative to Mint Display Manager [MDM] and adding support where it was missing and the results are promising.’

Read more

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Security Tips for Installing Linux on Your SysAdmin Workstation

    Once you’ve chosen a Linux distro that meets all the security guidelines set out in our last article, you’ll need to install the distro on your workstation.

  • Fedora 26 crypto policy Test Day today (2017-03-30)!
  • Open-source developers targeted in sophisticated malware attack

    For the past few months, developers who publish their code on GitHub have been targeted in an attack campaign that uses a little-known but potent cyberespionage malware.

    The attacks started in January and consisted of malicious emails specifically crafted to attract the attention of developers, such as requests for help with development projects and offers of payment for custom programming jobs.

    The emails had .gz attachments that contained Word documents with malicious macro code attached. If allowed to execute, the macro code executed a PowerShell script that reached out to a remote server and downloaded a malware program known as Dimnie.

  • A scramble at Cisco exposes uncomfortable truths about U.S. cyber defense

    When WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange disclosed earlier this month that his anti-secrecy group had obtained CIA tools for hacking into technology products made by U.S. companies, security engineers at Cisco Systems (CSCO.O) swung into action.

    The Wikileaks documents described how the Central Intelligence Agency had learned more than a year ago how to exploit flaws in Cisco's widely used Internet switches, which direct electronic traffic, to enable eavesdropping.

    Senior Cisco managers immediately reassigned staff from other projects to figure out how the CIA hacking tricks worked, so they could help customers patch their systems and prevent criminal hackers or spies from using the same methods, three employees told Reuters on condition of anonymity.

  • NTPsec: a Secure, Hardened NTP Implementation

    Network time synchronization—aligning your computer's clock to the same Universal Coordinated Time (UTC) that everyone else is using—is both necessary and a hard problem. Many internet protocols rely on being able to exchange UTC timestamps accurate to small tolerances, but the clock crystal in your computer drifts (its frequency varies by temperature), so it needs occasional adjustments.

    That's where life gets complicated. Sure, you can get another computer to tell you what time it thinks it is, but if you don't know how long that packet took to get to you, the report isn't very useful. On top of that, its clock might be broken—or lying.

    To get anywhere, you need to exchange packets with several computers that allow you to compare your notion of UTC with theirs, estimate network delays, apply statistical cluster analysis to the resulting inputs to get a plausible approximation of real UTC, and then adjust your local clock to it. Generally speaking, you can get sustained accuracy to on the close order of 10 milliseconds this way, although asymmetrical routing delays can make it much worse if you're in a bad neighborhood of the internet.

  • Zelda Coatings

    I assume that every permutation of scams will eventually be tried; it is interesting that the initial ones preyed on people's avarice and dishonesty: "I will transfer millions to your bank account, then you share with me" - with subsequent scams appealing to another demographic: "I want to donate a large sum to your religious charity" - to perhaps capture a more virtuous but still credulous lot. Where will it end ?

Tizen and Android

Filed under
Android
Linux

Linux and Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux

Mesa and Intel Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

RadeonSI OpenGL vs. RADV Vulkan Performance For Mad Max

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Feral Interactive today released their first Linux ported game into public beta that features a Vulkan renderer. Mad Max on Linux now supports Vulkan and OpenGL, making for some fun driver/GPU benchmarking. Up first are some Radeon RX 480 and R9 Fury Vulkan vs. OpenGL benchmarks for Mad Max when using Mesa 17.1-dev Git.

Read more

Ubuntu 17.04: A mouse-sized step forward

Filed under
Ubuntu

It's almost the fourth month of the year. You know what that means. A new Ubuntu release is upon us. This time around, the release number is 17.04 and the name is Zesty Zapus. For those that don't know, a zapus is a genus of North American jumping mice and the only extant mammal with a total of 18 teeth.

Which means the zapus is quite unique. Does that translate over to the upcoming release of one of the most popular Linux distributions on the planet (currently listed as fourth on Distrowatch)? Let's find out.

Read more

Quad-core Atom thin client offers hardened ThinLinux

Filed under
Linux

Dell revealed a tiny “Wyse 3040” thin client that runs ThinOS or a hardened new ThinLinux on a quad-core Intel SoC, and supports Citrix, MS, and VMware.

Dell has launched its “lightest, smallest and most power-efficient thin client” yet, with a 101.6 x 101.6 x 27.9mm Wyse 3040 system that weighs 0.24kg and runs on under 5 Watts. The device is powered by a quad-core, 1.44GHz Intel Atom x5-Z8350 “Cherry Trail” SoC, giving it 30 percent better performance than “previous generations,” says Dell, presumably referring to the single-core Wyse 3010 and the dual-core 3020 and 3030. The power-efficient (2W SDP) SoC also runs on the UP board and UP Core SBCs.

Read more

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Why OpenStack is the wrong cloud for Red Hat to be building its future on

Filed under
Red Hat

Just because one can make money from OpenStack doesn't mean one should. Red Hat, on its recent earnings call, gladly assumed the title of "Red Hat of OpenStack," meaning the "vendor that does certification and confidently allow[s] both hardware and software vendors to participate in the ecosystem." In a similar vein, I've called OpenStack Red Hat's "Linux moment," a chance to productize the growing cloud movement.

Read more

Linux 4.10.7

Filed under
Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 4.10.7 kernel.

All users of the 4.10 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.10.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.10.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

Read more

Also: Linux 4.9.19

Linux 4.4.58

11 reasons why Android is winning

Filed under
Android

You know the smartphone has supplanted every other consumer technology when all anyone really wants in a car now is a “smartphone on wheels.” In a world where most smartphone users have Android-based models, Google is aiming to reach the next billion users coming online — with Android as the nexus of activity.

Whether it’s as a Google Home oracle/assistant, Android Auto smart car integration, TensorFlow machine learning or DayDream virtual reality, the Internet search behemoth now aims to become the search engine for your life. Add to that a serious focus on developer tooling and solutions such as Firebase and Android Studio 2.3, and it’s clear that Google is ramping its current ubiquity up to a whole new level. Here are 11 reasons why Android isn’t just for phones anymore.

Read more

Qt Creator 4.3 Beta released

Filed under
KDE

Qt Quick Designer now integrates a QML code editor. This allows you to use views like the Properties editor and the Navigator also for text based editing. When you use the split view, you directly see the effects of what you are doing. The graphical editor got support for adding items and tab bar to stacked containers like StackedLayout and SwipeView, a tool bar with common actions, and support for HiDPI displays.

Read more

Also: Qt Creator 4.3 Beta Rolls Out QML Code Editor & CMake Server-Mode

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Red Hat - Another Quarter And A Totally New Set Of Investor Perceptions
  • BIG open-source love Microsoft and Google? You still won't catch AWS [Ed: Microsoft does not love FOSS (or loved by it); it actively attacks FOSS.]

    Open source wasn’t supposed to matter in the cloud. After the Free Software Foundation’s failed attempt to rein in network-delivered software services, some wrung their hands and waited for the open source apocalypse. Instead of imploding, however, open source adoption has exploded, with ever more permissive licenses rising to largely eliminate the need to contribute anything back.

  • Open Source Data:The Last Frontier of the Fintech Revolution

    In the early days of computing, programmers and software developers shared their creations learned from each other and therefore advanced computing and software engineering to new heights.

  • The cheap arm project: An affordable, open-source robotics project

    What do you get when you put together wood and rope? Well according to Plymouth University’s Professor Guido Bugmann: a low-cost, open source, 2 meter tall robot! All buildable for under £2000. The Cheap Arm Project (CHAP) began as an MSc project aimed at developing an affordable mobile robot arm system that could be used by wheelchair users to access daily objects at inaccessible heights or weights (the extreme case being 2 litre bottle).

  • European Interoperability Framework: Commission presents new guidance for digital public services

    The announcement will be made today, at the Digital Day in Rome, together with other initiatives that aim to promote cooperation between EU Member States to better prepare society to reap the full potential of the digital transformation. Many EU Member States are digitising their public administrations to save time, reduce costs, increase transparency, and improve the quality of services that they offer to citizens and businesses. Doing this in a coordinated way ensures that the public sector is not only digital but also interoperable. The EU framework published today will help Member States to follow a common approach when making their public services available online, also across countries and policy areas. This will contribute to reducing bureaucracy for people and businesses, for example, when requesting certificates, enrolling to services, or handing in tax declarations.

  • Carbon Black warns of over reliance on 'nascent' machine learning security

    Security professionals cited high false positive rates and the ease with which machine learning-based technologies can be bypassed – at present – as the most serious barriers to adoption.

Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Microsoft Still at It

Filed under
Microsoft
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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Security Tips for Installing Linux on Your SysAdmin Workstation
    Once you’ve chosen a Linux distro that meets all the security guidelines set out in our last article, you’ll need to install the distro on your workstation.
  • Fedora 26 crypto policy Test Day today (2017-03-30)!
  • Open-source developers targeted in sophisticated malware attack
    For the past few months, developers who publish their code on GitHub have been targeted in an attack campaign that uses a little-known but potent cyberespionage malware. The attacks started in January and consisted of malicious emails specifically crafted to attract the attention of developers, such as requests for help with development projects and offers of payment for custom programming jobs. The emails had .gz attachments that contained Word documents with malicious macro code attached. If allowed to execute, the macro code executed a PowerShell script that reached out to a remote server and downloaded a malware program known as Dimnie.
  • A scramble at Cisco exposes uncomfortable truths about U.S. cyber defense
    When WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange disclosed earlier this month that his anti-secrecy group had obtained CIA tools for hacking into technology products made by U.S. companies, security engineers at Cisco Systems (CSCO.O) swung into action. The Wikileaks documents described how the Central Intelligence Agency had learned more than a year ago how to exploit flaws in Cisco's widely used Internet switches, which direct electronic traffic, to enable eavesdropping. Senior Cisco managers immediately reassigned staff from other projects to figure out how the CIA hacking tricks worked, so they could help customers patch their systems and prevent criminal hackers or spies from using the same methods, three employees told Reuters on condition of anonymity.
  • NTPsec: a Secure, Hardened NTP Implementation
    Network time synchronization—aligning your computer's clock to the same Universal Coordinated Time (UTC) that everyone else is using—is both necessary and a hard problem. Many internet protocols rely on being able to exchange UTC timestamps accurate to small tolerances, but the clock crystal in your computer drifts (its frequency varies by temperature), so it needs occasional adjustments. That's where life gets complicated. Sure, you can get another computer to tell you what time it thinks it is, but if you don't know how long that packet took to get to you, the report isn't very useful. On top of that, its clock might be broken—or lying. To get anywhere, you need to exchange packets with several computers that allow you to compare your notion of UTC with theirs, estimate network delays, apply statistical cluster analysis to the resulting inputs to get a plausible approximation of real UTC, and then adjust your local clock to it. Generally speaking, you can get sustained accuracy to on the close order of 10 milliseconds this way, although asymmetrical routing delays can make it much worse if you're in a bad neighborhood of the internet.
  • Zelda Coatings
    I assume that every permutation of scams will eventually be tried; it is interesting that the initial ones preyed on people's avarice and dishonesty: "I will transfer millions to your bank account, then you share with me" - with subsequent scams appealing to another demographic: "I want to donate a large sum to your religious charity" - to perhaps capture a more virtuous but still credulous lot. Where will it end ?

Tizen and Android

Linux and Linux Foundation

Mesa and Intel Graphics