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Monday, 21 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Bodhi Linux 5.0 Enters Development Based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, First Alpha Is Out Rianne Schestowitz 1 22/05/2018 - 12:26am
Blog entry Spring in Tux Machines Rianne Schestowitz 4 21/05/2018 - 11:16pm
Story 70-inch Android touchscreen targets interactive education Rianne Schestowitz 1 21/05/2018 - 10:58pm
Blog entry Catchup Mode Roy Schestowitz 1 21/05/2018 - 10:57pm
Blog entry How To Install Software In Linux : An Introduction Mohd Sohail 1 21/05/2018 - 10:57pm
Blog entry PostInstallerF Prepares Post Install In Ubuntu And Fedora Mohd Sohail 1 21/05/2018 - 10:57pm
Blog entry Holidays Calm Roy Schestowitz 1 21/05/2018 - 10:56pm
Story Manjaro 0.8.13 Gets Budgie, Cinnamon, Xfce and MATE Update Rianne Schestowitz 1 21/05/2018 - 10:56pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 21/05/2018 - 8:55pm
Story Lucky 13? Red Hat releases Red Hat OpenStack Platform 13 Rianne Schestowitz 21/05/2018 - 8:46pm

Bodhi Linux 5.0 Enters Development Based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, First Alpha Is Out

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Now that Canonical released Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), more and more Ubuntu-based GNU/Linux distributions would want to upgrade to it for their next major releases, including Bodhi Linux with the upcoming 5.0 series. The first Alpha is here today to give us a glimpse of what to expect from the final release.

Besides being based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, the Bodhi Linux 5.0 operating system will be shipping with the forthcoming Moksha 0.3.0 desktop environment based on the Enlightenment window manager/desktop environment, and it's powered by the Linux 4.9 kernel series. Also, it supports 32-bit PAE and non-PAE systems.

Read more

Lucky 13? Red Hat releases Red Hat OpenStack Platform 13

Filed under
Red Hat

In a day filled with news about companies adopting OpenStack Queens, Red Hat, a leading OpenStack Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud, stood out with its release of its long-term support Red Hat OpenStack Platform (RHOP) 13 since it's one of OpenStack's most stalwart supporters.

At OpenStack Summit in Vancouver, Canada, Red Hat announced RHOP 13's release. RHOP is scheduled to be available in June via the Red Hat Customer Portal and as a component of both Red Hat Cloud Infrastructure and Red Hat Cloud Suite.

Read more

Also: VMware ready to release new OpenStack cloud program

Plasma 5.12.5 bugfix update for Kubuntu 18.04 LTS – Testing help required

Filed under
KDE
Ubuntu

Are you using Kubuntu 18.04, our current LTS release?

We currently have the Plasma 5.12.5 LTS bugfix release available in our Updates PPA, but we would like to provide the important fixes and translations in this release to all users via updates in the main Ubuntu archive. This would also mean these updates would be provide by default with the 18.04.1 point release ISO expected in late July.

Read more

New Arduino boards include first FPGA model

Filed under
Linux

Arduino launched a “MKR Vidor 4000” board with a SAMA21 MCU and Cyclone 10 FPGA, as well as an “Uno WiFi Rev 2” with an ATmega4809 MCU. Both boards have a crypto chip and ESP32-based WiFi module.

In conjunction with this weekend’s Maker Faire Bay Area, Arduino launched two Arduino boards that are due to ship at the end of June. The MKR Vidor 4000 is the first Arduino board equipped with an field programmable . The Intel Cyclone 10 FPGA. will be supported with programming libraries and a new visual editor. The Arduino Uno WiFi Rev 2, meanwhile, revises the Arduino Uno WiFi with a new Microchip ATmega4809 MCU. It also advances to an ESP32-based u-blox NINA-W102 WiFi module, which is also found on the Vidor 4000.

Read more

DragonFlyBSD 5.3 Works Towards Performance Improvements

Filed under
BSD

Given that DragonFlyBSD recently landed some SMP performance improvements and other performance optimizations in its kernel for 5.3-DEVELOPMENT but as well finished tidying up its Spectre mitigation, this weekend I spent some time running some benchmarks on DragonFlyBSD 5.2 and 5.3-DEVELOPMENT to see how the performance has shifted for an Intel Xeon system.

Read more

Red Hat News: KVM, OpenStack Platform 13 and More

Filed under
Red Hat

today's leftover

Filed under
Misc
  • The Prominent Changes Of Phoronix Test Suite 8.0

    With development on Phoronix Test Suite 8.0 wrapping up for release in the coming weeks, here is a recap of some of the prominent changes for this huge update to our open-source, cross-platform benchmarking software.

  • AMD AOCC 1.2 Code Compiler Offers Some Performance Benefits For EPYC

    Last month AMD released the AOCC 1.2 compiler for Zen systems. This updated version of their branched LLVM/Clang compiler with extra patches/optimizations for Zen CPUs was re-based to the LLVM/Clang 6.0 code-base while also adding in experimental FLANG support for Fortran compilation and various other unlisted changes to their "znver1" patch-set. Here's a look at how the performance compares with AOCC 1.2 to LLVM Clang 6.0 and GCC 7/8 C/C++ compilers.

  • More Roads And Faster Browsers

    And it's exactly what is happening with our Web pages. Browsers become more performant. So developers instead of using this extra performance to make the page extra-blazingly fast, we use it to pack more DOM nodes, CSS animations and JavaScript driven user experiences.

  • Firefox 61 Beta 6 Testday Results

    As you may already know, last Friday – May 18th – we held a new Testday event, for Firefox 61 Beta 6.

    Thank you all for helping us make Mozilla a better place: gaby2300, Michal, micde, Jarrod Michell, Petri Pollanen, Thomas Brooks.

    From India team: Aishwarya Narasimhan, Mohamed Bawas, Surentharan and Suren, amirthavenkat, krish.

  • Lemonade Proposes Open Source Insurance Policy for All to Change, Adopt

    Technology-focused homeowners and renters insurer Lemonade Inc. has proposed an open source renters insurance policy that anyone can contribute to changing, even its rivals since Lemonade is not copyrighting it.

  • Security updates for Monday

Development Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • My talk from the RISC-V workshop in Barcelona
  • KDAB at SIGGRAPH 2018

    Yes, folks. This year SIGGRAPH 2018 is in Canada and we’ll be there at the Qt booth, showing off our latest tooling and demos. These days, you’d be surprised where Qt is used under the hood, even by the biggest players in the 3D world!

  • 9 Best Free Python Integrated Development Environments

    Python is a widely used general-purpose, high level programming language. It’s easy to read and learn. It’s frequently used for science, data analysis, and engineering. With a burgeoning scientific community and ecosystem, Python is an excellent environment for students, scientists and organizations that develop technology software.

    One of the essential tools for a budding Python developer is a good Integrated Development Environment (IDE). An IDE is a software application that provides comprehensive facilities to programmers for software development.

    Many coders learn to code using a text editor. And many professional Python developers prefer to stay with their favourite text editor, in part because a lot of text editors can be used as a development environment by making use of plugins. But many Python developers migrate to an IDE as this type of software application offers, above all else, practicality. They make coding easier, can offer significant time savings with features like autocompletion, and built-in refactoring code, and also reduces context switching. For example, IDEs have semantic knowledge of the programming language which highlights coding problems while typing. Compiling is ‘on the fly’ and debugging is integrated.

  • Want to Debug Latency?

    In the recent decade, our systems got complex. Our average production environments consist of many different services (many microservices, storage systems and more) with different deployment and production-maintenance cycles. In most cases, each service is built and maintained by a different team — sometimes by a different company. Teams don’t have much insight into others’ services. The final glue that puts everything together is often a staging environment or sometimes the production itself!

    Measuring latency and being able to react to latency issues are getting equally complex as our systems got more complex. This article will help you how to navigate yourself at a latency problem and what you need to put in place to effectively do so.

Devices: AsteroidOS, Das blinkenlight, Android P

Filed under
OS
  • The open source AsteroidOS is a new alternative to Wear OS

    AsteroidOS is a new Linux-based open source operating system that can be used as a replacement to Wear OS.

    A small team of developers have been hard at work on the smartwatch platform for the last four years. As the culmination of their efforts, this week the first stable version was made available to the public. It plays nice with a few Wear OS-compatible smartwatches.

  • Das blinkenlights are back thanks to RPi revival of the PDP-11

    The designers left the I2C port of the Raspberry Pi free for hacks, and “it is not very hard to add support for such things in the simh emulator, so the PiDP-11 can use them as I/O”.

    The SR switches on the PiDP-11's SR switches can be set to boot various operating systems (this part is a work in progress), so instead of RSX-11MPlus users can choose BSD, DOS-11, Unix System 6 or System 7 and the like.

  •  

  • How Android P Will Increase Battery Life

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

GNU nano 2.9.7 was released

Filed under
GNU

Accumulated changes over the last five releases include: the ability to bind a key to a string (text and/or escape sequences), a default color of bright white on red for error messages, an improvement to the way the Scroll-Up and Scroll-Down commands work, and the new --afterends option to make Ctrl+Right (next word) stop at the end of a word instead of at the beginning. Check it out.

Read more

Red Hat and Fedora News

Filed under
Red Hat

Games: Cities: Skylines - Parklife, Descenders, WolfenDoom: Blade of Agony, Stoneshard

Filed under
Gaming
  • Cities: Skylines - Parklife launches this Thursday, get the main game super cheap on Humble Store

    With the release of Cities: Skylines - Parklife on Thursday, it's going to expand the already great city builder with some fun new features. For those who don't have Cities: Skylines yet, it has a massive sale on Humble Store with 75% off.

  • Extreme downhill free-riding game 'Descenders' just had a huge update, needs a quick fix on Linux

    Descenders is an extreme downhill free-riding game currently in Early Access and their first major update just went live. I've been quite a big fan of it, as it showed a massive amount of promise at the initial release.

    I held off on covering this update right away, since the released version of the update broke the 64bit Linux version. Nearly a week later and no fix, so here's how you can fix it manually:

    Right click on it in your Steam library and go to properties, then hit the Local Files tab up the top and press Browse Local Files… once there, open the Descenders_Data folder, go into the Plugins folder and delete "libfmod.so".

  • WolfenDoom - Blade of Agony is looking for AMD testers

    The GZDoom-powered FPS total conversion WolfenDoom: Blade of Agony [Official Site] is pushing on with development of Chapter 3: The Clash of Faith.

  • Open-world roguelike RPG 'Stoneshard' will have Linux support, nearly hit the Kickstarter goal

    Stoneshard [Official Site] is a pretty good sounding open-world RPG, it's currently on Kickstarter with a promise of Linux support and they've nearly hit their goal. With 26 days left to go, they've hit $28K of their $30K goal, so it looks like they will manage it easily.

    Inspired by the likes of Diablo, ADOM, Darkest Dungeon and more, they have a lot to live up to in terms of their inspiration. What makes it sound quite interesting, is the survival elements you heal to deal with like diseases, broken bones, mental health and more.

USB Audio Class 3.0 Improvements Coming To Linux 4.18

Filed under
Linux

With the recently minted Linux 4.17 kernel there was initial USB Audio Class 3.0 support for this audio-over-USB specification while with Linux 4.18 that UA3 support will be further enhanced.

UAC3 is primarily geared for "USB audio over USB Type-C" that is an upgrade over UAC2 with improved power management, new descriptors, and more.

Read more

Graphics/GPU: OpenCL, Mesa, X.Org

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • IWOCL OpenCL 2018 Videos Start Appearing Online

    There is the conference program for those that are curious about the sessions that took place during this annual OpenCL conference. Eventually, slide decks should be available from there too.

    The most prominent session video of interest to hobbyists and general OpenCL developers/users will likely be The Khronos Group's President, Neil Trevett, providing a "state of the nation" on CL...

  • Mesa 18.1 Officially Released as the Most Advanced Linux Graphics Stack Series

    The development team behind the open-source Mesa graphics stack announced over the weekend the general availability of the final Mesa 18.1 release for Linux-based operating systems.

    The Mesa 18.1 series comes approximately two months after the 18.0 branch, which probably most GNU/Linux distributions are using these days, and which already received its fourth maintenance updates. Mesa 18.1 introduces a few new features across all supported graphics drivers, but it's mostly another stability update.

  • Mach64 & Rendition Drivers Now Work With X.Org Server 1.20

    Anyone happening to have an ATI Mach 64 graphics card from the mid-90's or a 3Dfx-competitor Rendition graphics card also from the 90's can now enjoy the benefits of the recently released X.Org Server 1.20.

    Mach 64 and Rendition are among the X.Org DDX (2D) drivers still being maintained for the X.Org Server. Even though using either of these two decade old graphics cards would be painfully slow with a Linux desktop stack from today especially if paired with CPU and memory from that time-frame, the upstream X.Org developers still appear willing to maintain support for these vintage graphics processors. Well, at least as far as ensuring the drivers still build against the newest software -- we've seen before out of these old drivers that they are updated to work for new releases, but at times can actually be broken display support for years before anyone notices with said hardware.

Tesla Compliance

Filed under
OSS
Legal
  • It Only Took Six Years, But Tesla Is No Longer Screwing Up Basic Software Licenses

    Tesla is actually doing it. The electric car maker is starting to abide by open source software licenses that it had previously ignored, and releasing the code it’s sat on for over six years, according to Electrek.

    Tesla’s super smart cars, specifically the sporty Model S sedan and Model X SUV, incorporate a lot of open source software, from Linux, the open source operating system, to BusyBox, a collection of tools that are useful when working with Linux and other UNIX environments (like macOS). All open source software is released under licenses and one of the most popular licenses is the GPL, or General Public License.

  • Tesla releases some of its software to comply with open source rules

    Tesla makes some of the most popular electric vehicles out there and the systems in those cars rely on open source software for operating systems and features. Some of that open source software that is used in Tesla products has a license agreement that requires Tesla to at least offer the user access to the source code. Tesla hasn’t been making that offer.

  • Tesla open sources some of its Autopilot source code

    ELECTRIC CAR MAKER Tesla tends to keep the details of its work under lock and key, but now Elon Musk's company is plonking some of its automotive tech source code into the open source community.

    Tesla dumped some of its code used to build the foundations of its Autopilot semi-autonomous driving tech and the infotainment system found on the Model S and Model X cars, which makes uses of Nvidia's Tegra chipset, on GitHub.

    Even if you're code-savvy, don't go expecting to build your own autonomous driving platform on top of this source code, as Tesla has still kept the complete Autopilot framework under wraps, as well as deeper details of the infotainment system found in its cars. But it could give code wranglers a better look into how Tesla approaches building infotainment systems and giving its cars a dose of self-driving smarts.

  • Tesla releases source code

    Tesla has taken its first step towards compliance with the GNU General Public Licence (GPL) by releasing some of its source code.

    The car maker has opened two GitHub repositories which contain the buildroot material used to build the system image on its Autopilot platform, and the kernel sources for the boards and the Nvidia-based infotainment system in the Model S and Model X.

Ubuntu 18.10 Aims to Improve Laptop Battery Life

Filed under
Ubuntu

It's been less than a month since Ubuntu 18.04 LTS released, but when you work on a six-month release cycle the focus moves quickly to what comes next. Canonical is doing just that by telling us what we can expect to see in Ubuntu 18.10, which arrives in October.

If you're only just getting used to Ubuntu 18.04, don't worry, Canonical hasn't forgotten about you. In a blog post, Canonical's desktop engineering manager, Will Cooke, details plans to release 18.04.1 in July. It will fix a number of bugs, but also introduce the ability to, among other things, unlock Ubuntu with your fingerprint.

Read more

GNOME 3.30 Desktop to Introduce New App for Finding Free Internet Radio Stations

Filed under
GNOME

GNOME 3.30 is currently in heavy development, with a second snapshot expected to land this week, and the GNOME Project recently updated their future plans page for the upcoming releases with the inclusion of the Internet Radio Locator app, which could make its debut during this cycle.

Internet Radio Locator is an open-source graphical application built with the latest GNOME/GTK+ technologies and designed to help users easily locate free Internet radio stations from various broadcasters around the globe. It currently supports text-based location search for a total of 86 stations from 76 world cities.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Plasma 5.12.5 bugfix update for Kubuntu 18.04 LTS – Testing help required

Are you using Kubuntu 18.04, our current LTS release? We currently have the Plasma 5.12.5 LTS bugfix release available in our Updates PPA, but we would like to provide the important fixes and translations in this release to all users via updates in the main Ubuntu archive. This would also mean these updates would be provide by default with the 18.04.1 point release ISO expected in late July. Read more

New Arduino boards include first FPGA model

Arduino launched a “MKR Vidor 4000” board with a SAMA21 MCU and Cyclone 10 FPGA, as well as an “Uno WiFi Rev 2” with an ATmega4809 MCU. Both boards have a crypto chip and ESP32-based WiFi module. In conjunction with this weekend’s Maker Faire Bay Area, Arduino launched two Arduino boards that are due to ship at the end of June. The MKR Vidor 4000 is the first Arduino board equipped with an field programmable . The Intel Cyclone 10 FPGA. will be supported with programming libraries and a new visual editor. The Arduino Uno WiFi Rev 2, meanwhile, revises the Arduino Uno WiFi with a new Microchip ATmega4809 MCU. It also advances to an ESP32-based u-blox NINA-W102 WiFi module, which is also found on the Vidor 4000. Read more

DragonFlyBSD 5.3 Works Towards Performance Improvements

Given that DragonFlyBSD recently landed some SMP performance improvements and other performance optimizations in its kernel for 5.3-DEVELOPMENT but as well finished tidying up its Spectre mitigation, this weekend I spent some time running some benchmarks on DragonFlyBSD 5.2 and 5.3-DEVELOPMENT to see how the performance has shifted for an Intel Xeon system. Read more

Red Hat News: KVM, OpenStack Platform 13 and More