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Wednesday, 04 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story GNU/Linux Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 04/05/2016 - 3:15pm
Story Phoronix on Graphics Roy Schestowitz 04/05/2016 - 3:14pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 04/05/2016 - 3:13pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 04/05/2016 - 3:10pm
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 04/05/2016 - 3:09pm
Story Ubuntu 16.04 Review: What’s New for Desktop Users Rianne Schestowitz 04/05/2016 - 2:51pm
Story Workflow and efficiency geek talks Drush and Drupal Rianne Schestowitz 04/05/2016 - 2:49pm
Story Libby Clark May 4, 2016 RedMonk Analyst: Open Source is Good for Business [Video] Rianne Schestowitz 04/05/2016 - 2:47pm
Story After three years of Linux, Munich reveals draft of crunch report that could decide its open source future Rianne Schestowitz 04/05/2016 - 2:39pm
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 04/05/2016 - 1:06pm

GNU/Linux Leftovers

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Phoronix on Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS

Ubuntu 16.04 Review: What’s New for Desktop Users

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Ubuntu is a tricky distribution. As much as I love it on my home server, my desktop is a different ballgame. In my experience, releases between LTS versions have many new technologies that may or may not survive in the next LTS. There were many technologies or features that Canonical thought were ambitious -- HUD, experimenting with menus, online dash search, Ubuntu Software Center, etc. -- but they were abandoned. So, if I were to use Ubuntu on my desktop, I would still choose LTS.

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Workflow and efficiency geek talks Drush and Drupal

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Interviews
Drupal

I started using Drupal because I needed an open source content management system (CMS) to use in several community projects. One of the projects I was involved with was just getting started and had narrowed its CMS selection down to either Drupal or Joomla. At the time I was using a different framework, but I had considered Drupal in the past and knew that I liked it a lot better than Joomla. I convinced them to go with the new Drupal 6 release and converted all of my other projects for consistency. I started working with Drush because I wanted a unified mechanism to work with local and remote sites. My first major contribution to Drush was site aliases and sql-sync in Drush 3.

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Libby Clark May 4, 2016 RedMonk Analyst: Open Source is Good for Business [Video]

Filed under
OSS

The technology industry is changing fast – much faster than we've seen in the past – due to the proliferation of high quality, free and open source software, said Stephen O'Grady, co-founder and principal analyst at RedMonk, in his keynote talk at Collaboration Summit in March. Developers have access to open source technologies without asking for permission.

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After three years of Linux, Munich reveals draft of crunch report that could decide its open source future

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Linux
OSS

As for the implications of this interim report, Matthias Kirschner, president of the Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE), said its assessment of Accenture's findings is that the problems don't lie with the PC clients themselves but with the way they are managed and their associated backend infrastructure.

"The study does not mention any concrete problems with the PC clients (neither GNU/Linux nor proprietary). It highlights, that IT security, especially at the client level, is perceived as bad for getting things done.

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Security Leftovers

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Security

Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

openSUSE Tumbleweed Prepares for GCC 6, Users Get Linux Kernel 4.5.2, Mesa 11.2

Filed under
SUSE

The openSUSE Project today, May 4, 2016, published details about the latest major open-source components that landed in the main software repositories of the openSUSE Tumbleweed distro recently.

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Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Tweak Is Now Officially Dead and Buried

    The creator and maintainer of the once popular Ubuntu Tweak utility, Tualatrix Chou, announced a few minutes ago that its project is no longer under maintenance starting May 2, 2016.

    Ubuntu Tweak was one of the most downloaded applications that could have allowed Ubuntu users to tweak every single component of their GNU/Linux operating systems, making their lives much easier while using Ubuntu.

  • Ubuntu 16.10 Won’t Use Unity 8 By Default

    Unity 8 will not ship as the default desktop in Ubuntu 16.10, the Ubuntu desktop team has said.

    Yakkety Yak will ship the tried and trusty — or tired and dusty, depending on your point of view — Unity 7 desktop as the default desktop environment.

  • A step-by-step guide to installing Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) on your PC

    Ubuntu 16.04 is a long-term supported (LTS) version of the popular GNU/Linux operating system from Canonical, which was officially launched on April 21, 2016. Dubbed as Xenial Xerus, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is the 24th release of Ubuntu, which will be supported with critical security patches and software updates for the next five years, that is until 2021.

Linux or Bust, No Mir/Unity 8 this Fall

Filed under
-s

More news out of the Ubuntu developers summit headlines today's Linux news. OMG!Ubuntu! reported today that "Yakkety Yak will ship the tired and dusty Unity 7 desktop." In other news Michael Larabel posted today of the developers' discussion surrounding FESCo's decision not to rebuild the full codebase for Fedora 25 and The Var Guy listed five reasons Linux is on the rise.

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Linux or Bust: Why Businesses Can’t Ignore This Growing Trend

Filed under
GNU
Linux

It used to be a clear sign of geekiness. People who were into Linux would rave about its benefits and flexibility…as long as you knew how to install your own OS, dig around for the hardware drivers you needed, and be a master of command-line instructions. For a world building technical literacy through more user-friendly front-end systems, Linux was a niche reserved for technology enthusiasts.

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Scopes and Swipes, or How I Learned to Love Ubuntu's Unity

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Ubuntu

I am still not about to run Unity as the main desktop environment on my workstation, not when KDE is available. However, seeing Unity run in the environment it was designed for does eliminate my distaste for it.

Thanks to Unity, the Aquaris M10 offers an experience that my Samsung Galaxy Tab2 cannot possibly compete with. I have already done productive work on it, and plan on taking it with me the next time I travel. Far from being just a piece of hardware to review, it has become my tablet of choice.

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CoreOS Linux 899.17.0 Released with OpenSSL 1.0.2h, NTPd 4.2.8p7, and Git 2.7.3

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The CoreOS developers have released a new version of the Linux kernel-based operating system engineered for massive server deployments, CoreOS 899.17.0.

Powered by Linux kernel 4.3.6, CoreOS 899.17.0 arrived on May 3, 2016, as an upgrade to the previous release of the GNU/Linux operating system, which system administrators can use for creating and maintaining open-source projects for Linux Containers, version 899.15.0.

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Black Lab Brings Real-Time Kernel Patching to Its Enterprise Desktop 8 Linux OS

Filed under
GNU
Linux

A few moments ago, Softpedia has been informed by Black Lab Software about the general availability of the sixth DP (Developer Preview) build of the upcoming Black Lab Linux Enterprise Desktop 8 OS.

Sporting a new kernel from the Linux kernel from the 4.2 series, Black Lab Linux Enterprise Desktop 8 Developer Preview 6 arrives today for early adopters and public beta testers with real-time kernel patching, which means that you won't have to reboot your Black Lab Linux Enterprise OS after kernel upgrades.

"DP6 offers you a window into what's new and whats coming when Black Lab Enterprise Desktop and Black Lab Enterprise Desktop for Education is released. As with our other developer previews it also aids in porting your applications to the new environment," said Roberto J. Dohnert, CEO, Black Lab Software.

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USB stick brings neural computing functions to devices

Filed under
Linux

Movidius unveiled a “Fathom” USB stick and software framework for integrating accelerated neural networking processing into embedded and mobile devices.

On April 28, Movidius announced availability of the USB-interfaced “Fathom Neural Compute Stick,” along with an underlying Fathom deep learning software framework. The device is billed as “the world’s first embedded neural network accelerator,” capable of allowing “powerful neural networks to be moved out of the cloud, and deployed natively in end-user devices.”

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ImageMagick Security Bug Puts Sites at Risk

Filed under
Security
  • Open Source ImageMagick Security Bug Puts Sites at Risk

    ImageMagick, an open source suite of tools for working with graphic images used by a large number of websites, has been found to contain a serious security vulnerability that puts sites using the software at risk for malicious code to be executed onsite. Security experts consider exploitation to be so easy they’re calling it “trivial,” and exploits are already circulating in the wild. The biggest risk is to sites that allows users to upload their own image files.

    Information about the vulnerability was made public Tuesday afternoon by Ryan Huber, a developer and security researcher, who wrote that he had little choice but to post about the exploit.

  • Huge number of sites imperiled by critical image-processing vulnerability

    A large number of websites are vulnerable to a simple attack that allows hackers to execute malicious code hidden inside booby-trapped images.

    The vulnerability resides in ImageMagick, a widely used image-processing library that's supported by PHP, Ruby, NodeJS, Python, and about a dozen other languages. Many social media and blogging sites, as well as a large number of content management systems, directly or indirectly rely on ImageMagick-based processing so they can resize images uploaded by end users.

  • Extreme photo-bombing: Bad ImageMagick bug puts countless websites at risk of hijacking

    A wildly popular software tool used by websites to process people's photos can be exploited to execute malicious code on servers and leak server-side files.

    Security bugs in the software are apparently being exploited in the wild right now to compromise at-risk systems. Patches to address the vulnerabilities are available in the latest source code – but are incomplete and have not been officially released, we're told.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Leftovers: OSS

Ubuntu 16.04 Review: What’s New for Desktop Users

Ubuntu is a tricky distribution. As much as I love it on my home server, my desktop is a different ballgame. In my experience, releases between LTS versions have many new technologies that may or may not survive in the next LTS. There were many technologies or features that Canonical thought were ambitious -- HUD, experimenting with menus, online dash search, Ubuntu Software Center, etc. -- but they were abandoned. So, if I were to use Ubuntu on my desktop, I would still choose LTS. Read more

Workflow and efficiency geek talks Drush and Drupal

I started using Drupal because I needed an open source content management system (CMS) to use in several community projects. One of the projects I was involved with was just getting started and had narrowed its CMS selection down to either Drupal or Joomla. At the time I was using a different framework, but I had considered Drupal in the past and knew that I liked it a lot better than Joomla. I convinced them to go with the new Drupal 6 release and converted all of my other projects for consistency. I started working with Drush because I wanted a unified mechanism to work with local and remote sites. My first major contribution to Drush was site aliases and sql-sync in Drush 3. Read more