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Tuesday, 23 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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NVIDIA 367.44 Stable Linux Driver Released

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

While the NVIDIA 370 Linux driver series is currently in beta, the 367 driver series has been updated as the latest long-lived branch release.

The Pascal-based TITAN X, GeForce GTX 1060 3GB, and GTX 1060 6GB are now officially supported... That's just with regards to proper product detection as I've been using the GTX 1060 fine on earlier driver releases, etc.

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Also: Nvidia 367.44 Driver Adds TITAN X (Pascal) and GeForce GTX 1060 Support to Linux

OpenIndiana Operating System Gets MATE 1.14 Desktop Environment, New ISOs

Filed under
OS

Alexander Pyhalov from the OpenIndiana development team was happy to announce the availability of the latest MATE 1.14 open-source desktop environment for the Solaris-derived operating system.

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Canonical Announces Snapcraft 2.15 for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS with Many New Features

Filed under
Ubuntu

We reported earlier on the release of the major Mir 0.24.0 display server for the Ubuntu Linux operating system, and now we would like to inform you about the latest Snapcraft 2.15 tool for packaging apps in the Snap universal binary format.

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KDevelop 5.0.0 release

Filed under
KDE

Almost two years after the release of KDevelop 4.7, we are happy to announce the immediate availability of KDevelop 5.0. KDevelop is an integrated development environment focusing on support of the C++, Python, PHP and JavaScript/QML programming languages. Many important changes and refactorings were done for version 5.0, ensuring that KDevelop remains maintainable and easy to extend and improve over the next years. Highlights include much improved new C/C++ language support, as well as polishing for Python, PHP and QML/JS.

Read more

CoreOS 1068.10.0 Released with Many systemd Fixes, Still Using Linux Kernel 4.6

Filed under
OS

Today, August 23, 2016, the development team behind the CoreOS security-oriented GNU/Linux operating system have released the CoreOS 1068.10.0 stable update, along with new ISO images for all supported platforms.

Read more

SUSE Linux and openSUSE Leap to Offer Better Support for ARM Systems Using EFI

Filed under
SUSE

The YaST development team at openSUSE and SUSE is reporting on the latest improvements that should be available in the upcoming openSUSE Leap 42.2 and SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 2 operating systems.

Read more

Create modular server-side Java apps direct from mvn modules with diet4j instead of an app server

Filed under
Server

In the latest release, the diet4j module framework for Java has learned to run modular Java apps using the Apache jsvc daemon (best known from running Tomcat on many Linux distros).

Tizen Phones in India

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

Canonical Releases Massive Mir 0.24.0 Display Server Update for Ubuntu Linux OS

Filed under
Security
Ubuntu

Canonical has pushed a new massive update (version 0.24.0) of the Mir display server used to power the Unity 8 user interface of the next-generation Ubuntu Linux operating system.

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GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • Deus Ex: Mankind Divided looks like it may be getting a Linux & SteamOS release

    Woah! Holy Sh...Deus Ex: Mankind Divided looks like it may be getting a Linux & SteamOS release which has literally blown my tiny little mind.

  • The Pirate: Caribbean Hunt, a free to play pirate ship sim is coming to Linux

    From Polish developers Home Net Games it features pretty nice visuals, but I am doing my usual wait and see approach on their funding method. Hopefully it won't be pay to win malarkey.

    Looking at their website, it looks like it's already a mobile game that is now being pushed onto PC. Hopefully they won't make the same mistake a lot of developers do and keep the mobile feel to it.

  • Deus Ex: Mankind Divided Might Be Seeing A Linux Release

    Today marked the release of Deus Ex: Mankind Divided for Windows gamers and there's signs it might see a native Linux port.

    Deus Ex: Mankind Divided is a RPG stealth video game developed by Eidos Montreal and published by Square Enix. This single-player game has so far received positive reviews from Windows game sites.

Ubuntu Founder Sets the Bar for Successful OpenStack Implementations

Filed under
Ubuntu

The real long-term test of any large-scale, modern infrastructure is an economic one, according to Ubuntu creator Mark Shuttleworth.

Shuttleworth, who serves as an advisor to Canonical, the open-source software company that delivers Ubuntu, said today at OpenStack East 2016 that the biggest driver of economics in the cloud will be operations, particularly how many processes a team can operate using OpenStack.

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Samsung to Release Next Tizen OS Update Soon, New Features On Offer

Samsung is planning on pushing a new update to its Tizen based smartphones with a whole lot of new features, most of which were suggested by Tizen phone users on Samsung’s Tizen community forum. The tech giant says the update was in response to the brilliant suggestions and ideas by users which it says will provide Tizen smartphone users with richer experiences.

One of the new features the up coming update will usher in is SMS delivery report, which was hitherto unavailable on Tizen smartphones. This sometimes leave users wondering if their SMS got delivered to the intended recipient. Now that is about to change, as delivery reports will be available after OS upgrade.

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Desktop News

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • Why Google plans to stop supporting your Chromebook after five years

    It’s worth noting that end-of-life doesn’t have to mean the end of useful hardware. If you have the know-how, you can install Linux on your Chromebook to extend its lifespan. Otherwise, users whose Chromebooks are still in fine working order just have to hope that end-of-life notification never comes.

  • EFF slams Microsoft's 'blatant disregard' for user privacy with Windows 10 [Ed: It's textbook definition of malware]

    THE ELECTRONIC FRONTIER FOUNDATION (EFF) has lashed out at Microsoft over the company's "blatant disregard" for user privacy with the pushy, data-slurping Windows 10 operating system.

    Following the launch of a petition in June, EFF has heard from thousands of pissed off people who are asked it to take action against Microsoft, and the privacy campaigners are doing just that. EFF is calling on Microsoft to listen to its users, of which more than 6,000 have signed the online petition, and incorporate their complaints into its operating system.

    "Otherwise, Microsoft may find that it has inadvertently discovered just how far it can push its users before they abandon a once-trusted company for a better, more privacy-protective solution," EFF's Amul Kalia said in a blog post.

    First on EFF’s radar is Microsoft’s backhanded tactics to get people to upgrade to Windows 10, which we here at the INQUIRER know about all too well.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Summary

    And so, GSoC has come to an end. In this post, I'm going to describe what I have done in the past 13 weeks.

  • The State of Wayland's GSoC Project For Improved Output Handling

    Google's annual Summer of Code 2016 (GSoC) is now officially over and we're starting to see the final reports issued by the many student developers involved. One of the reports worth mentioning is the Wayland project around getting Weston to start without any outputs and improved output handling.

    Student developer Armin Krezović was getting his feet wet with Wayland this summer and was led b

  • GSoC with Pitivi
  • GUADEC Experience

    In this blog post, I will be sharing my GUADEC experience which recently held from 11-Aug-2015 to 17-Aug-2016 in Karlsruhe, Germany. I actually got to see the faces behind IRC nicks, met most of developers and people from GNOME community and also most importantly, GUADEC helped me to meet my Google Summer of Code mentor Debarshi Ray in person which was just great.

  • GNOME Usability Test Results (Part 1)

    This is the first part of analysis for the usability test I recently conducted, with the purpose to uncover usability flaws of two GNOME applications: Photos and Calendar.
    For this part I am focusing on visualizing the results, demographics and talk more about the methodology I used for testing. We will take a closer look on how testers performed on every task given, using a heat map. Hopefully this will create a clear picture of the testing process and help to “get to know” the participants and understand them better!

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Weeks 2016/33

    Week 33 brought us again 5 snapshots (0812, 0813, 0815, 0816 and 0817). There were some smaller and bigger updates, as usual.

Leftovers: Debian

Filed under
Debian
  • Reproducible Builds: week 69 in Stretch cycle

    Daniel Stender blogged about python packaging and explained some caveats regarding reproducible builds.

  • Proposing speakers for DebConf17

    As you may already know, next DebConf will be held at Collège de Maisonneuve in Montreal from August 6 to August 12, 2017. We are already thinking about the conference schedule, and the content team is open to suggestions for invited speakers.

  • Google Summer of Code 2016 : Final Report

    This project aims to improve diffoscope tool and fix Debian packages which are unreproducible in Reproducible builds testing framework.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • Digital Asset to Open Source Smart Contract Language

    Digital Asset Holdings has announced it intends to open-source DAML, the smart contracting language it acquired from startup Elevence earlier this year.

    Though no date has been set for the transition, the Blythe Masters-led blockchain startup credited its bid to "advance industry adoption" of the tech as the impetus for the move.

  • Reasons behind Enterprises' Appeal towards Open Source Analytics Frameworks

    Big Data might be a relatively new term but not an entirely new concept. It has been around for millennia. Even in the Paleolithic age, the cavemen of Africa etched markings into bones or sticks to monitor their food supplies. Then came the abacus, the library of Alexandria, the Antikythera Mechanism (the world’s first computational device), and the list goes on. As time passed by, the art of data analysis or deduction evolved giving rise to new sciences and technologies– statistics, data storage, business intelligence, and data centers.

    When the internet storm took over the human world in the latter part of the 20th century, analog storage systems made way for digital storage and cloud services. In another ten years or so, the total storage information processed in the world grew from 1.5 billion gigabytes to 9.57 zettabytes (9.57 trillion gigabytes to be specific). In the meantime, Wired gave a name to this vast ocean of information– Big Data, (quite undervalued if you ask me, how about Cosmic Data!). At the same time, something else also passed under the radar. It was Hadoop, an open source framework for Big Data analysis, developed by the Apache Software Foundation, the open source advocates. Soon, Hadoop was extensively adopted by businesses for two reasons; firstly, it was cost-efficient, secondly, it was fast.

    Since then, open source has been the buzzword for Big Data analytics. But, what makes open source analytics platform attractive for enterprises even though there is no guarantee about security or the quality of the software?

  • Walmart's OneOps open source cloud management platform could become part of OpenStack

    The retailing giant is pondering a move where its OneOps open source platform could be lumped under OpenStack.

  • Apache CloudStack Still Going, Arrives in New Version

    In case you don't know its history, CloudStack had more momentum a few years ago as an open cloud platform than OpenStack has now. Citrix, which owned it, passed the open source CloudStack platform to the Apache Software Foundation, and CloudStack continues to advance and is widely used. It has even inspired a popular forked version.

    Now, the Apache CloudStack project has announced the availability of Apache CloudStack v4.9, the latest version of the cloud platform used for creating private, public, and hybrid cloud environments. Apache remains a steady steward for CloudStack, even as OpenStack has overtaken it in popularity.

  • Time To Move To PostgreSQL

    Sigh… I understand that businesses need to make money but proper businesses don’t jerk their customers around in the process. That drives them away.

    Large businesses that use MySQL/MariaDB depend on the MaxScale component and changing the licence for that jerks them around. In the process, MariaDB is preventing a larger community from sharing in the development, a major plus of FLOSS. So, this is essentially kicking a large segment of the market for SQL databases to a non-Free solution. It really is time to go to PostgreSQL, a truly Free/Libre Open Source database from top to bottom.

  • Your wget is broken and should DIE, GitHubbers tell Microsoft

    Well, that didn't take long: within a week of applause for Microsoft's decision to open-source PowerShell, a comment-war has broken out over curl and wget.

    For those not familiar with these commands: they're open source command line tools for fetching internet content without a browser. Apart from obvious applications like downloading whole sites (for example as backup), they're also under the hood for a lot of other toolsets (an example the author is familiar with – GIS tools use curl and/or wget to fetch maps from Web services).

    For some reason, Microsoft's team decided to put aliases for curl and wget in Windows PowerShell – but, as this thread begins, those aliases don't deliver curl and wget functionality.

  • Kontena Announces Funding and Launches Developer-Friendly, Open Source Container and Microservices Platform
  • CNCF Offers Open Source Developers Free Access to Its 1000 Node Server Community Cluster
  • UK Government Digital Service looking for a "Chief Penguin"

    According to the job description on LinkedIn, the new role has been created as part of a change of course to "a more concerted approach to open source, building collaboration and reuse internally and making higher impact contributions to the wider open source community". The new Lead will "work with teams in GDS and across government to help build their open source community, both through driving specific, focused projects and by providing tools and an environment that allow the work to grow and thrive". At the same time, the job requires technical hands-on capabilities as well: "day to day responsibilities will alternate between programming, liaising with colleagues from other professions (eg. communications, legal and delivery management), community building and leading projects".

  • Dutch Accountability Hack set for week before Little Prince's Day

    On Friday 9 September, an Accountability Hack will be organised at the Dutch Court of Audit in The Hague. Developers and open data adepts are asked to participate and work on innovative (mobile) apps that allow people to check on government spending and returns. Increased transparency helps strengthen democracy, fight corruption and waste, and improve efficiency and accountability.

  • 7 resources for open education materials

    Shrinking school budgets and growing interest in open content has created an increased demand for open educational resources. According to the FCC, "The U.S. spends more than $7 billion per year on K-12 textbooks, but too many students are still using books that are 7-10 years old, with outdated material." There is an alternative: openly licensed courseware. But where do you find this content and how can you share your own teaching and learning materials?

  • Open education is more than open content

    The famous playwright George Bernard Shaw once said: "If you have an apple and I have an apple and we exchange apples, then you and I will still each have one apple. But if you have an idea and I have an idea and we exchange these ideas, then each of us will have two ideas."

    I love that quote, and in May I shared it with a room full of educators, administrators, and open source advocates at New York University during the Open Summit, an open conversation about education. I believe it reveals something critical about the future of education and the positive role openness can play in the future, if we embrace it.

  • Iranian architects release open-source parametric brick wall script and stencil
  • Open-Source CNC Farming Machine Reimagines Food Production

    It’s open-source. It’s customizable. And it’s just as exciting to gardeners as is it is to garage tinkerers. Meet FarmBot, humanity’s first open-source Computer Numeric Control (CNC) farming machine.

KDE Plasma 5.7.4 Desktop Environment Is Out with Plasma Desktop and KWin Fixes

Filed under
KDE

Today, August 23, 2016, KDE announced the release of the fourth maintenance update for the KDE Plasma 5.7 desktop environment, bringing multiple improvements and bug fixes.

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Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Linux Kernel News

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux Kernel Development Report 2016
  • Celebrating 25 years with Linux

    Linux has become the world’s most popular operating system, and over half of the worldwide device shipments are based on Linux.

    – The Linux kernel was invented at our department. It is definitely the most influential software coming from the Department of Computer Science having significant global impact, says Professor Sasu Tarkoma, head of the department at the University.

    Linus Torvalds, the inventor of the Linux kernel used to study and work at the department and simultaneously work on the kernel. The kernel work started in 1991 and the 1.0 of the operating system was released in 1994.

  • LINUX 25 YEARS
  • How Intel's open source Data Plane Development Kit enables high-performance Linux networking

    Linux is a general purpose operating system. This comment may sound like an obvious statement, but it's sometimes easy to forget. Because it's a general operating system, it is used across a variety of use cases.

    The OS is used in Internet of Things (IoT) devices, smartphones, tablets, servers, and data center appliances. However, it sometimes takes a reminder that using Linux for specialized use cases, such as a network or even network function devices, takes some customization of the kernel or the acceptance that performance may be uneven or limited. The Intel-sponsored open source Data Plane Development Kit (DPDK) project hopes to extend the usefulness of Linux to include high-performance networking devices.

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More in Tux Machines

KDevelop 5.0.0 release

Almost two years after the release of KDevelop 4.7, we are happy to announce the immediate availability of KDevelop 5.0. KDevelop is an integrated development environment focusing on support of the C++, Python, PHP and JavaScript/QML programming languages. Many important changes and refactorings were done for version 5.0, ensuring that KDevelop remains maintainable and easy to extend and improve over the next years. Highlights include much improved new C/C++ language support, as well as polishing for Python, PHP and QML/JS. Read more

CoreOS 1068.10.0 Released with Many systemd Fixes, Still Using Linux Kernel 4.6

Today, August 23, 2016, the development team behind the CoreOS security-oriented GNU/Linux operating system have released the CoreOS 1068.10.0 stable update, along with new ISO images for all supported platforms. Read more

SUSE Linux and openSUSE Leap to Offer Better Support for ARM Systems Using EFI

The YaST development team at openSUSE and SUSE is reporting on the latest improvements that should be available in the upcoming openSUSE Leap 42.2 and SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 2 operating systems. Read more

Create modular server-side Java apps direct from mvn modules with diet4j instead of an app server

In the latest release, the diet4j module framework for Java has learned to run modular Java apps using the Apache jsvc daemon (best known from running Tomcat on many Linux distros). If org.example.mydaemon is your top Maven project, all you do is specify it as the root module for your jsvc invocation, and diet4j figures out the dependencies when jsvc starts. An example systemd.service file is available.