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Wednesday, 24 May 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 24/05/2017 - 8:07am
Story Graphics News Rianne Schestowitz 24/05/2017 - 8:05am
Story More of today's howtos Rianne Schestowitz 24/05/2017 - 8:04am
Story GNOME News: Black Lab Drops GNOME and Further GNOME Experiments in Meson Rianne Schestowitz 24/05/2017 - 8:00am
Story Fedora and Red Hat Rianne Schestowitz 24/05/2017 - 7:57am
Story Debian and Derivatives Rianne Schestowitz 24/05/2017 - 7:55am
Story OSS Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 24/05/2017 - 7:54am
Story Events and Talks Rianne Schestowitz 24/05/2017 - 7:53am
Story LibreOffice News Rianne Schestowitz 24/05/2017 - 7:51am
Story Ubuntu Leftovers: Security, Unity, Internet, and Derivatives Rianne Schestowitz 24/05/2017 - 7:06am

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Graphics News

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

GNOME News: Black Lab Drops GNOME and Further GNOME Experiments in Meson

Filed under
GNOME
  • Ubuntu-Based Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.0.1 Drops GNOME 3 for MATE Desktop

    Coming about two weeks after the release of Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11, which is based on the Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system using the HWE (hardware enablement) kernel from Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak), Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.0.1 appears to be an unexpected maintenance update addressing a few important issues reported by users lately.

  • 3.26 Developments

    My approach to development can often differ from my peers. I prefer to spend the early phase of a cycle doing lots of prototypes of various features we plan to implement. That allows me to have the confidence necessary to know early in the cycle what I can finish and where to ask for help.

  • Further experiments in Meson

    Meson is definitely getting more traction in GNOME (and other projects), with many components adding support for it in parallel to autotools, or outright switching to it. There are still bugs, here and there, and we definitely need to improve build environments — like Continuous — to support Meson out of the box, but all in all I’m really happy about not having to deal with autotools any more, as well as being able to build the G* stack much more quickly when doing continuous integration.

Fedora and Red Hat

Filed under
Red Hat

Debian and Derivatives

Filed under
Debian
  • Reproducible Builds: week 108 in Stretch cycle
  • Debuerreotype

    The project is named “Debuerreotype” as an homage to the photography roots of the word “snapshot” and the daguerreotype process which was an early method of taking photographs. The essential goal is to create “photographs” of a minimal Debian rootfs, so the name seemed appropriate (even if it’s a bit on the “mouthful” side).

  • The end of Parsix GNU/Linux

    The Debian-based Parsix distribution has announced that it will be shutting down six months after the Debian "Stretch" release.

  • Privacy-focused Debian 9 'Stretch' Linux-based operating system Tails 3.0 reaches RC status

    If you want to keep the government and other people out of your business when surfing the web, Tails is an excellent choice. The Linux-based operating system exists solely for privacy purposes. It is designed to run from read-only media such as a DVD, so that there are limited possibilities of leaving a trail. Of course, even though it isn't ideal, you can run it from a USB flash drive too, as optical drives have largely fallen out of favor with consumers.

    Today, Tails achieves an important milestone. Version 3.0 reaches RC status -- meaning the first release candidate (RC1). In other words, it may soon be ready for a stable release -- if testing confirms as much. If you want to test it and provide feedback, you can download the ISO now.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Chef expands its cloud and container menu

    Chef, a leading DevOps company, announced at ChefConf 2017 that it was adding new capabilities to it flagship Continous Automation/DevOps program, Chef Automate. This enables enterprises to transition from server- and virtual machine- (VM) based IT systems to cloud-native and container-first environments with consistent automation and DevOps practices.

  • Nextcloud 12: The bigger, better, in-house small business cloud

    It's not even been a year since Frank Karlitschek, co-founder and former CTO of ownCloud, forked ownCloud into Nextcloud. Since then, this do-it-yourself, open-source Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud has become increasingly popular. Now, its latest version, Nextcloud 12, the program is adding more Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) features.

  • The Spirit of Open Source
  • What happened to Mastodon after its moment in the spotlight?

    More than a month later, the buzz over Mastodon has quieted. But though it may not be making headlines, the service continues to grow.

  • Mozilla: One Step Closer to a Closed Internet

    We’re deeply disheartened. Today’s FCC vote to repeal and replace net neutrality protections brings us one step closer to a closed internet. Although it is sometimes hard to describe the “real” impacts of these decisions, this one is easy: this decision leads to an internet that benefits Internet Service Providers (ISPs), not users, and erodes free speech, competition, innovation and user choice.

  • The eternal battle for OpenStack's soul will conclude in three years. Again

    After six years as a formal project, OpenStack has survived numerous raids and famines and now finds itself in a not-too-weird space of being boring, on-premises infrastructure. That is, “boring” in the good way of focusing on what users want and fixing existing problems, only chasing shiny objects – cough, PaaS, cough, containers, cough, orchestration – as much as needed.

  • With version 2.0, Crate.io’s database tools put an emphasis on IoT

    Crate.io, the winner of our Disrupt Europe 2014 Battlefield, is launching version 2.0 of its CrateDB database today. The tool, which is available in both an open source and enterprise version, started out as a general-purpose but highly scalable SQL database. Over time, though, the team found that many of its customers were using the service for managing their machine data and, unsurprisingly, decided to focus its efforts on better supporting those clients.

  • NewSQL CockroachDB Ready for Prime Time

    There's a new open source database on the block. Although it has a name that will most likely make you cringe for the first dozen or so times you hear it -- CockroachDB -- I have a feeling that if it isn't already on your radar, it will be soon.

  • Windows 10 S Won't Support Fedora, SUSE Linux, and Ubuntu
  • Manage Linux servers with a Windows admin's toolkit [Ed: Well, the solution is learning GNU tools, not relying on proprietary stuff with back doors from Microsoft]
  • FreeBSD quarterly status report
  • openbsd changes of note 622
  • Book Review: Relayd and Httpd Mastery

    Overall an excellent book which is typical Michael W Lucas writing style. Easy to follow, clear cut instructions, and tons of new stuff to learn. If one must use OpenBSD or FreeBSD, then the chances are high that one will stick with the defaults that come with OpenBSD. No need to use fat Apache, or Nginx/Lighttpd web server especially when httpd and relayd audited for security by OpenBSD core team.

  • Guix System Distribution (GuixSD) 0.13.0 GNU/Linux OS Supports 64-bit ARM CPUs

    The GNU Guix and GuixSD 0.13.0 releases are here about five months after the December 2016 launch of version 0.12.0, and it appears to be a major milestone implementing a few important changes. First off, this release can now be installed on computers powered by AArch64 (64-bit ARM) processors.

  • The Good And Bad In WikiTribune, Wikipedia Founder's Open-Source News Site

    Countering the fake news threat has become a real challenge for social media platforms, which also serve as avenues of news dissemination along with the traditional media outlets.

  • Android Studio 3.0 Canary 1
  • Jaded by Java? Android now supports Kotlin programming language
  • Rcpp 0.12.11: Loads of goodies

    The elevent update in the 0.12.* series of Rcpp landed on CRAN yesterday following the initial upload on the weekend, and the Debian package and Windows binaries should follow as usual. The 0.12.11 release follows the 0.12.0 release from late July, the 0.12.1 release in September, the 0.12.2 release in November, the 0.12.3 release in January, the 0.12.4 release in March, the 0.12.5 release in May, the 0.12.6 release in July, the 0.12.7 release in September, the 0.12.8 release in November, the 0.12.9 release in January, and the 0.12.10.release in March --- making it the fifteenth release at the steady and predictable bi-montly release frequency.

  • Master Haskell Programming with Free Books

    Haskell is a standardized, general-purpose, polymorphically statically typed, lazy, purely functional language, very different from many programming languages. Recent innovations include static polymorphic typing, higher-order functions, user-definable algebraic data types, a module system, and more. It has built-in concurrency and parallelism, debuggers, profilers, rich libraries and an active community, with approximately 5,400 third-party open source libraries and tools.

  • [Older] Manifesto: Rules for standards-makers

    If we work together on a project based on open tech, these are the principles I will try to stick to. I wanted to put all this in one place, so I can pass it along to future software developers.

Events and Talks

Filed under
OSS

LibreOffice News

Filed under
LibO
  • LibreOffice leverages Google’s OSS-Fuzz to improve quality of office suite
  • LibreOffice leverages Google’s OSS-Fuzz to improve quality of office suite

    For the last five months, The Document Foundation has made use of OSS-Fuzz, Google’s effort to make open source software more secure and stable, to further improve the quality and reliability of LibreOffice’s source code. Developers have used the continuous and automated fuzzing process, which often catches issues just hours after they appear in the upstream code repository, to solve bugs – and potential security issues – before the next binary release.LibreOffice is the first free office suite in the marketplace to leverage Google’s OSS-Fuzz. The service, which is associated with other source code scanning tools such as Coverity, has been integrated into LibreOffice’s security processes – under Red Hat’s leadership – to significantly improve the quality of the source code.

  • Please participate in a survey about page margins

    Margins specify the amount of space to leave between the edges of the page and the document text. You can define it for the left/inner, right/outer, top and bottom side individually. Page margins are defined by default at 0.79″ respectively 2cm on each side in LibreOffice Writer (located under Format > Page). These default values are under close scrutiny now.

Ubuntu Leftovers: Security, Unity, Internet, and Derivatives

Filed under
Ubuntu

Software: NetworkManager, Kodi, Cumulus Weather App, Streamlink, Calibre

Filed under
Software
  • NetworkManager changes and improvements

    NetworkManager is the default service in Fedora for interfacing with the low level networking in the Kernel. It was created to provide a high-level interface for initializing and configuring networking on a system without shell scripts. Over the past few Fedora releases, the NetworkManager developers have put in a lot of effort to make it even better. This article covers some of the major improvements that have been implemented in NetworkManager over the past few Fedora releases.

  • Pioneer Kodi plug-in unplugs

    Developers of the popular Kodi plug-in Navi-X have pulled the plug on further development, citing the "current legal climate" around its work.

    The developers of the plugin, which first appeared a decade ago, state that they're no longer able to host Navi-X programme guides:

  • Cumulus Weather App for Linux Desktop

    ​Once upon a time, there used to be a very popular app called Stormcloud. And then it was no more. With the developer citing a range of issues including issues with the Yahoo API being used and the lack of time on the part of the developer. Some folks in the Linux community tried resurrecting it by creating a fork called Typhoon. And unfortunately, once again, that did not last for a long time. Now another developer by name Daryl Bennett with the aid of the original developer of Stormcloud has resurrected the app, and now it is called Cumulus.

  • Streamlink – Watch Online Video Streams From Command Line

    Streamlink is a command line streaming utility that allows you to watch online video streams in popular media players, such as VLC, MPlayer, MPlayer2, MPC-HC, mpv, Daum Pot Player, QuickTime, and OMXPlayer etc. It is written using Python programming language, and was forked from LiveStreamer, which is no longer maintained. Streamlink currently supports popular live video streaming services, such as YouTube, Dailymotion, Livestream, Twitch, UStream, and many more. Streamlink is built upon a plugin system which allows support for new services to be easily added. A full list of plugins currently included can be found on the Plugins page. Streamlink supports GNU/Linux, *BSDs, Microsoft Windows, and Mac OS X.

  • Linux utils that you might not know
  • Calibre A Free And Open Source Ebook Management System For Linux

    Having ebooks is really a good thing. It can be read anywhere, you get free from the hassle of storage and many more benefits. But it creates a problem when you got an enormous number of ebooks also in various formats. You will have the problem of searching perfect ebook you want to read at a time, you have to maintain various kind of software for every format and much more.

Security Leftovers: HackerOne, Let's Encrypt, and Shadow Brokers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • HackerOne experience with Weblate

    Weblate has started to use HackerOne Community Edition some time ago and I think it's good to share my experience with that. Do you have open source project and want to get more attention of security community? This post will answer how it looks from perspective of pretty small project.

    I've applied with Weblate to HackerOne Community Edition by end of March and it was approved early in April. Based on their recommendations I've started in invite only mode, but that really didn't bring much attention (exactly none reports), so I've decided to go public.

  • Who Are the Shadow Brokers?

    In 2013, a mysterious group of hackers that calls itself the Shadow Brokers stole a few disks full of National Security Agency secrets. Since last summer, they’ve been dumping these secrets on the internet. They have publicly embarrassed the NSA and damaged its intelligence-gathering capabilities, while at the same time have put sophisticated cyberweapons in the hands of anyone who wants them. They have exposed major vulnerabilities in Cisco routers, Microsoft Windows, and Linux mail servers, forcing those companies and their customers to scramble. And they gave the authors of the WannaCry ransomware the exploit they needed to infect hundreds of thousands of computer worldwide this month.

    After the WannaCry outbreak, the Shadow Brokers threatened to release more NSA secrets every month, giving cybercriminals and other governments worldwide even more exploits and hacking tools.

  • Why Akamai Supports Let's Encrypt

    The Let's Encrypt project has re-shaped the market for SSL/TLS certificates, providing millions of free security certificate to organization around the world.

    Among the many backers of Let's Encrypt is content delivery network platform provider Akamai. In a video interview with eSecurityPlanet, Andy Ellis, Chief Security Officer at Akamai, explains why Let's Encrypt matters and his view on the effort's real value.

  • Security in Serverless: What Gets Better, What Gets Worse?
  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 48 - Machine Learning: Not actually magic

    Josh and Kurt have a guest! Mike Paquette from Elastic discusses the fundamentals and basics of Machine Learning. We also discuss how ML could have helped with WannaCry.

4 Great Linux Distros Designed for Privacy and Security

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

Conventional security measures like antivirus programs are behind the curve when it comes to modern hackers and malware. Unfortunately, antivirus software and firewalls give users a false sense of security. In reality, new threats are being developed and unleashed into the wild every single day, and even the best antivirus programs have to play catchup.

Recent ransomware attacks (aka. WannaCry) have targeted Windows-based PCs in over 150 countries – cyber security and privacy is incredibly important. Windows and macOS are easy to use and popular; however, they are much more susceptible to malicious code.

Linux is free and open source, which means there are hundreds of “flavors.” These individual distributions are tweaked to different specifications. Security-focused users will be pleased to know that there are a number of Linux distros designed with security and privacy in mind.

Read more

Linux Foundation and Linux Kernel

Filed under
Linux
  • General Manager of Training at The Linux Foundation Forecasts Cloudy Weather

    Where does The Linux Foundation believe ones time is well spent to catapult their career objectives? It is fairly apparent after reaching out to Clyde Seepersad, General Manager Training and Certification of The Linux Foundation, the cloud is the place to be. When communicating with him on a variety of topics that revolve around The Linux Foundation's certification offerings and education, the central point of focus is the cloud. Clyde provided us with a slew of information about The Linux Foundation's efforts to make sure FLOSS continues to succeed for the foreseeable future.

  • Linux Foundation LFCS and LFCE Pratik Tolia Plans to Become Authorized Instructor

    The Linux Foundation offers many resources for developers, users, and administrators of Linux systems. One of the most important offerings is its Linux Certification Program, which is designed to give you a way to differentiate yourself in a job market that's hungry for your skills.

  • Hughes: Updating Logitech Hardware on Linux

    Logitech has provided firmware updates, but not for "unsupported" platforms like Linux. Hughes has filled that gap by getting documentation and a fixed firmware image from Logitech and adding support for these devices to fwupd. He is now looking for testers to ensure that the whole thing works across all devices. This is important work that is well worth supporting.

  • Updating Logitech Hardware on Linux

    This gave an attacker with $15 of hardware the ability to basically take over remote PCs within wireless range, which could be up to 50m away. This makes sitting in a café quite a dangerous thing to do when any affected hardware is inserted, which for the unifying dongle is quite likely as it’s explicitly designed to remain in an empty USB socket. The main manufacturer of these devices is Logitech, but the hardware is also supplied to other OEMs such as Amazon, Microsoft, Lenovo and Dell where they are re-badged or renamed. I don’t think anybody knows the real total, but by my estimations there must be tens of millions of affected-and-unpatched devices being used every day.

  • An introduction to Libral, a systems management library for Linux

    Linux, in keeping with Unix traditions, doesn't have a comprehensive systems management API. Instead, management is done through a variety of special-purpose tools and APIs, all with their own conventions and idiosyncrasies. That makes scripting even simple systems-management tasks difficult and brittle.

  • Linux Kernel 4.11.2-1 released
  • Cgroups/namespaces/seccomp/capabilities course
  • Linux Shared Libraries course, Munich, Germany, 20 July 2017

    I've scheduled a public instance of my "Building and Using Shared Libraries on Linux" course to take place in Munich, Germany on 20 July 2017. This one-day course provides a thorough introduction to building and using shared libraries. covering topics such as: the basics of creating, installing, and using shared libraries; shared library versioning and naming conventions; the role of the dynamic linker; run-time symbol resolution; controlling symbol visibility; symbol versioning; preloading shared libraries; and dynamically loaded libraries (dlopen). The course format is a mixture of theory and practical.

Red Hat Linux Upgrade Pushes New Security, Automation Tools

Filed under
Red Hat

Red Hat on Tuesday announced the availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.4 beta.

RHEL 7.4 includes new security and compliance features and streamlined automation, along with tools for improved systems administration.

This latest upgrade comes nearly three years into the series 7 lifecycle. It continues to provide enterprises with a rich and stable foundation for both existing applications and a new generation of workloads and solutions.

Read more

The History of Ubuntu Linux, Canonical's Open Source OS

Filed under
Ubuntu

In October 2004 the first Ubuntu release, Ubuntu 4.10, debuted. Codenamed Warty Warthog because it was rough around the edges, Ubuntu 4.10 inaugurated a tradition of releasing new version of Ubuntu each April and October that Canonical has maintained up to the present -- with the exception of Ubuntu 6.06, which came out a couple of months late in 2006.

Ubuntu 4.04 launched six months after Mark Shuttleworth first met with Debian developers to discuss the creation of a new, Debian-based Linux distribution that would emphasize ease-of-use, regular release cycles, accessibility and internationalization.

Read more

Tizen News: New Software, Smart TVs, Gear S3

Filed under
Linux

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android
  • Pimp your smartphone with the latest Android O Pixel launcher

    If your device is running Android 6.0.1 Marshmallow or above, you can now pimp it out with the latest Google O Pixel launcher. One of the contributors on the XDA Developers forum has recently posted the APK file, which you can install on your smartphone.

    Before you download the file, make sure your device can install apps that aren’t listed on the Play Store. To do so, open up the Settings menu, tap on Security, and enable the “Unknown sources” option. Once that’s done, all you have to do is download the file and then tap on it in the notification shade to install the launcher on your device.

  • Google is killing off Android's emoji blobs

    The best emojis on the market are no more: Google’s weird blobs are being retired in favour of more conventional circular yellow faces.

  • Google I/O: What about Android on Chrome OS?

    The hottest tech-show ticket these days is Google I/O. In the just-finished 2017 conference, Google announced lots of great stuff, including a lightweight version of Android, Android Go; a first look at the next version of Android, Android O; and a major upgrade to Google Home. One thing that was noticeably missing, however: big news about Android apps on Chrome OS.

  • RaspAnd Marshmallow 6.0.1 Android OS Now Available for Raspberry Pi 3 and 2 SBCs

    After informing us about the availability of a new build of his RaspAnd Nougat operating system for Raspberry Pi 3 and 2 SBCs based on Android 7.1.2, Arne Exton released an updated RaspAnd Marshmallow 6 version.

LinuxAndUbuntu Distro Review Of The Week - Deepin OS

Filed under
Reviews

​Depth/Deepin OS is not just another Linux Distro, but one with something new to show. Deepin OS is simply speaking, just beautiful. Deepin OS, formerly known as Deepin, Linux Deepin, and Hiweed GNU/Linux is a Linux distro with an identity crisis. Seriously, this distro has undergone name changes you always have to check twice if the name is still the same. And that is all the negative you are going to say about this distro. Honestly speaking, Deepin OS is surely going to blow you away. I have been keeping an eye on this distro since 2013 and it still manages to impress me.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME News: Black Lab Drops GNOME and Further GNOME Experiments in Meson

  • Ubuntu-Based Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.0.1 Drops GNOME 3 for MATE Desktop
    Coming about two weeks after the release of Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11, which is based on the Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system using the HWE (hardware enablement) kernel from Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak), Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.0.1 appears to be an unexpected maintenance update addressing a few important issues reported by users lately.
  • 3.26 Developments
    My approach to development can often differ from my peers. I prefer to spend the early phase of a cycle doing lots of prototypes of various features we plan to implement. That allows me to have the confidence necessary to know early in the cycle what I can finish and where to ask for help.
  • Further experiments in Meson
    Meson is definitely getting more traction in GNOME (and other projects), with many components adding support for it in parallel to autotools, or outright switching to it. There are still bugs, here and there, and we definitely need to improve build environments — like Continuous — to support Meson out of the box, but all in all I’m really happy about not having to deal with autotools any more, as well as being able to build the G* stack much more quickly when doing continuous integration.

Fedora and Red Hat

Debian and Derivatives

  • Reproducible Builds: week 108 in Stretch cycle
  • Debuerreotype
    The project is named “Debuerreotype” as an homage to the photography roots of the word “snapshot” and the daguerreotype process which was an early method of taking photographs. The essential goal is to create “photographs” of a minimal Debian rootfs, so the name seemed appropriate (even if it’s a bit on the “mouthful” side).
  • The end of Parsix GNU/Linux
    The Debian-based Parsix distribution has announced that it will be shutting down six months after the Debian "Stretch" release.
  • Privacy-focused Debian 9 'Stretch' Linux-based operating system Tails 3.0 reaches RC status
    If you want to keep the government and other people out of your business when surfing the web, Tails is an excellent choice. The Linux-based operating system exists solely for privacy purposes. It is designed to run from read-only media such as a DVD, so that there are limited possibilities of leaving a trail. Of course, even though it isn't ideal, you can run it from a USB flash drive too, as optical drives have largely fallen out of favor with consumers. Today, Tails achieves an important milestone. Version 3.0 reaches RC status -- meaning the first release candidate (RC1). In other words, it may soon be ready for a stable release -- if testing confirms as much. If you want to test it and provide feedback, you can download the ISO now.

OSS Leftovers

  • Chef expands its cloud and container menu
    Chef, a leading DevOps company, announced at ChefConf 2017 that it was adding new capabilities to it flagship Continous Automation/DevOps program, Chef Automate. This enables enterprises to transition from server- and virtual machine- (VM) based IT systems to cloud-native and container-first environments with consistent automation and DevOps practices.
  • Nextcloud 12: The bigger, better, in-house small business cloud
    It's not even been a year since Frank Karlitschek, co-founder and former CTO of ownCloud, forked ownCloud into Nextcloud. Since then, this do-it-yourself, open-source Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud has become increasingly popular. Now, its latest version, Nextcloud 12, the program is adding more Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) features.
  • The Spirit of Open Source
  • What happened to Mastodon after its moment in the spotlight?
    More than a month later, the buzz over Mastodon has quieted. But though it may not be making headlines, the service continues to grow.
  • Mozilla: One Step Closer to a Closed Internet
    We’re deeply disheartened. Today’s FCC vote to repeal and replace net neutrality protections brings us one step closer to a closed internet. Although it is sometimes hard to describe the “real” impacts of these decisions, this one is easy: this decision leads to an internet that benefits Internet Service Providers (ISPs), not users, and erodes free speech, competition, innovation and user choice.
  • The eternal battle for OpenStack's soul will conclude in three years. Again
    After six years as a formal project, OpenStack has survived numerous raids and famines and now finds itself in a not-too-weird space of being boring, on-premises infrastructure. That is, “boring” in the good way of focusing on what users want and fixing existing problems, only chasing shiny objects – cough, PaaS, cough, containers, cough, orchestration – as much as needed.
  • With version 2.0, Crate.io’s database tools put an emphasis on IoT
    Crate.io, the winner of our Disrupt Europe 2014 Battlefield, is launching version 2.0 of its CrateDB database today. The tool, which is available in both an open source and enterprise version, started out as a general-purpose but highly scalable SQL database. Over time, though, the team found that many of its customers were using the service for managing their machine data and, unsurprisingly, decided to focus its efforts on better supporting those clients.
  • NewSQL CockroachDB Ready for Prime Time
    There's a new open source database on the block. Although it has a name that will most likely make you cringe for the first dozen or so times you hear it -- CockroachDB -- I have a feeling that if it isn't already on your radar, it will be soon.
  • Windows 10 S Won't Support Fedora, SUSE Linux, and Ubuntu
  • Manage Linux servers with a Windows admin's toolkit [Ed: Well, the solution is learning GNU tools, not relying on proprietary stuff with back doors from Microsoft]
  • FreeBSD quarterly status report
  • openbsd changes of note 622
  • Book Review: Relayd and Httpd Mastery

    Overall an excellent book which is typical Michael W Lucas writing style. Easy to follow, clear cut instructions, and tons of new stuff to learn. If one must use OpenBSD or FreeBSD, then the chances are high that one will stick with the defaults that come with OpenBSD. No need to use fat Apache, or Nginx/Lighttpd web server especially when httpd and relayd audited for security by OpenBSD core team.

  • Guix System Distribution (GuixSD) 0.13.0 GNU/Linux OS Supports 64-bit ARM CPUs
    The GNU Guix and GuixSD 0.13.0 releases are here about five months after the December 2016 launch of version 0.12.0, and it appears to be a major milestone implementing a few important changes. First off, this release can now be installed on computers powered by AArch64 (64-bit ARM) processors.
  • The Good And Bad In WikiTribune, Wikipedia Founder's Open-Source News Site
    Countering the fake news threat has become a real challenge for social media platforms, which also serve as avenues of news dissemination along with the traditional media outlets.
  • Android Studio 3.0 Canary 1
  • Jaded by Java? Android now supports Kotlin programming language
  • Rcpp 0.12.11: Loads of goodies
    The elevent update in the 0.12.* series of Rcpp landed on CRAN yesterday following the initial upload on the weekend, and the Debian package and Windows binaries should follow as usual. The 0.12.11 release follows the 0.12.0 release from late July, the 0.12.1 release in September, the 0.12.2 release in November, the 0.12.3 release in January, the 0.12.4 release in March, the 0.12.5 release in May, the 0.12.6 release in July, the 0.12.7 release in September, the 0.12.8 release in November, the 0.12.9 release in January, and the 0.12.10.release in March --- making it the fifteenth release at the steady and predictable bi-montly release frequency.
  • Master Haskell Programming with Free Books
    Haskell is a standardized, general-purpose, polymorphically statically typed, lazy, purely functional language, very different from many programming languages. Recent innovations include static polymorphic typing, higher-order functions, user-definable algebraic data types, a module system, and more. It has built-in concurrency and parallelism, debuggers, profilers, rich libraries and an active community, with approximately 5,400 third-party open source libraries and tools.
  • [Older] Manifesto: Rules for standards-makers

    If we work together on a project based on open tech, these are the principles I will try to stick to. I wanted to put all this in one place, so I can pass it along to future software developers.