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Saturday, 25 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 25/11/2017 - 9:56am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 25/11/2017 - 8:49am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 25/11/2017 - 4:42am
Story Software: VirtualBox, TeX Live Cockpit, Mailspring, Qt, Projects, and Maintainers Roy Schestowitz 25/11/2017 - 4:41am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 25/11/2017 - 4:38am
Story Tizen News Roy Schestowitz 25/11/2017 - 4:35am
Story Mozilla Firefox Quantum Roy Schestowitz 25/11/2017 - 4:33am
Story First Renesas based Raspberry Pi clone runs Linux Roy Schestowitz 25/11/2017 - 3:56am
Story Games: SuperTuxKart, Tannenberg, Observer Roy Schestowitz 25/11/2017 - 3:47am
Story Wine 2.22 Release and More Roy Schestowitz 25/11/2017 - 3:44am

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Software: VirtualBox, TeX Live Cockpit, Mailspring, Qt, Projects, and Maintainers

Filed under
Software
  • VirtualBox 5.2.2 Brings Linux 4.14 Fixes, HiDPI UI Improvements

    The Oracle developers behind VM VirtualBox have released a new maintenance build in the VirtualBox 5.2 series that is a bit more exciting than their usual point releases.

  • TeX Live Cockpit

    I have been working quite some time on a new front end for the TeX Live Manager tlmgr. Early versions have leaked into TeX Live, but the last month or two has seen many changes in tlmgr itself, in particular support for JSON output. These changes were mostly driven by the need (or ease) of the new frontend: TLCockpit.

  • Mailspring – A New Open Source Cross-Platform Email Client

    Mailspring is a fork of the now discontinued Nylas Mail client. It does, however, offer a much better performance, and is built with a native C++ sync engine instead of JavaScript. According to the development team, the company is sunsetting further development of Mailspring.

    Mailspring offers virtually all the best features housed in Nylas Mail, and thanks to its native C++ sync engine it uses fewer dependencies which results in less lag and a reduction in RAM usage by 50% compared to Nylas Mail.

  • Removing Qt 4 from Debian testing (aka Buster): some statistics

    We started filing bugs around September 9. That means roughly 11 weeks, which gives us around 8 packages fixed a week, aka 1.14 packages per day. Not bad at all!

  • Products Over Projects

    However, projects are not the only way of funding and organizing software development. For instance, many companies that sell software as a product or a service do not fund or organize their core product/platform development in the form of projects. Instead, they run product development and support using near-permanent teams for as long as the product is sold in the market. The budget may vary year on year but it is generally sufficient to fund a durable, core development organization continuously for the life of the product. Teams are funded to work on a particular business problem or offering over a period of time; with the nature work being defined by a business problem to address rather than a set of functions to deliver. We call this way of working as “product-mode” and assert that it is not necessary to be building a software product in order to fund and organize software development like this.

  • Why we never thank open source maintainers

    It is true that some of you guys can build a tool in a hackathon, but maintaining a project is a lot more difficult than building a project. Most of the time they are not writing code, but [...]

Tizen News

Filed under
Linux

Mozilla Firefox Quantum

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Can the new Firefox Quantum regain its web browser market share?

    When Firefox was introduced in 2004, it was designed to be a lean and optimized web browser, based on the bloated code from the Mozilla Suite. Between 2004 and 2009, many considered Firefox to be the best web browser, since it was faster, more secure, offered tabbed browsing and was more customizable through extensions than Microsoft’s Internet Explorer. When Chrome was introduced in 2008, it took many of Firefox’s best ideas and improved on them. Since 2010, Chrome has eaten away at Firefox’s market share, relegating Firefox to a tiny niche of free software enthusiasts and tinkerers who like the customization of its XUL extensions.

    According to StatCounter, Firefox’s market share of web browsers has fallen from 31.8% in December 2009 to just 6.1% today. Firefox can take comfort in the fact that it is now virtually tied with its former arch-nemesis, Internet Explorer and its variants. All of Microsoft’s browsers only account for 6.2% of current web browsing according to StatCounter. Microsoft has largely been replaced by Google, whose web browsers now controls 56.5% of the market. Even worse, is the fact that the WebKit engine used by Google now represents over 83% of web browsing, so web sites are increasingly focusing on compatibility with just one web engine. While Google and Apple are more supportive of W3C and open standards than Microsoft was in the late 90s, the web is increasingly being monopolized by one web engine and two companies, whose business models are not always based on the best interests of users or their rights.

  • Firefox Nightly Adds CSD Option

    I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Firefox 57 is awesome — so awesome that I’m finally using it as my default browser again.

    But there is one thing it the Linux version of Firefox sorely needs: client-side decoration.

First Renesas based Raspberry Pi clone runs Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

iWave’s “iW-RainboW-G23S” SBC runs Linux on a Renesas RZ/G1C, and offers -20 to 85°C support and expansion headers including a RPi-compatible 40-pin link.

iWave’s iW-RainboW-G23S is the first board we’ve seen to tap the Renesas RZ/G1C SoC, which debuted earlier this year. It’s also the first Renesas based SBC we’ve seen that features the increasingly ubiquitous Raspberry Pi 85 x 56mm footprint, layout, and RPi-compatible 40-pin expansion connector. The board is also notable for providing -20 to 85°C temperature support.

Read more

Also: GameShell Is An Open Source And Linux-powered Retro Game Console That You’ll Love

Games: SuperTuxKart, Tannenberg, Observer

Filed under
Gaming

Wine 2.22 Release and More

Filed under
Software
  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine development release 2.22 is now available.

  • Wine 2.22 Brings Improved 64-bit ARM Support

    Wine 2.22 is now available as the latest development release of this program to run Windows games/applications on Linux and other operating systems.

    Changes with this bi-weekly development release include a source selection dialog for scanners, improvements to ARM64 (AArch64 / 64-bit ARM) support, float audio formats with more than two channels in XAudio, fixes for DLL injection handling, input method improvements, and bug fixes.

  • Wine 2.22 is out with input improvements, XAudio improvements and a fix for The Witcher 3

    Wine 2.22 is now officially available as the latest development release on the road to the official Wine 3.0 release.

  • Using ‘Wine’ to Run Windows Games on Linux

    More and more people are switching to Linux. Why? Perhaps they’re seeking refuge from the flawed Windows operating systems. And Linux is becoming more accessible, partly because it can now provide much of what Windows can offer.

    Many apps have Linux alternatives. Microsoft Office, for example, can be replaced by LibreOffice. There are also 1,000s of games now available for Linux on Steam, and this number is increasing all the time.

    Yet every now and then, Windows users might still need an app that isn’t available on Linux or want to play a game that doesn’t have a Linux version. In these cases, they can use Wine to run whatever Windows programs they still need.

KDE: Introduction to Kdenlive, Qt 3D Aspect, Mini Bug Squashing Day

Filed under
KDE
  • A Brief Introduction to Kdenlive

    Kdenlive has become one of the main free software tools for audio-visual editing. Although complaints about earlier versions continue to dog its reputation — especially about syncing — the latest releases soon make clear that Kdenlive is now a mature and reliable tool. However, one thing it lacks is a general overview that helps new users navigate its complexity.

    Admittedly, the information users need is available. Yet finding it when you need it can be time-consuming, and add to the difficulties of learning a new application.

    Having just completed my first video — “Preparing Labels in LibreOffice” for WorldLabel — I think I have learned enough of the basics that my next effort should go far more efficiently. As a guide to myself, and to anyone else who might be starting to use Kdenlive, I present the following in the hopes of saving everyone some time and distraction.

  • Writing a Custom Qt 3D Aspect – part 1

    Qt 3D has a flexible and extensible architecture that allows us to easily add our own new functionality to it without disrupting the existing features.

  • Mini Bug Squashing Day

    In preparation for the 17.12 release we will be holding a mini bug squashing day on the 1st of December, between 10:00 and 15:30 (CET time). Community members are invited to submit their bug suggestions. For developers interested in contributing to the project we have a set up a list of low hanging bugs for them to cherry pick and get acquainted with the code base. Note that this is a great opportunity for prospective participants in the Season of KDE.

Xubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark - The winter is ... meh

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

I must say I'm a bit sad. Xubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark is nowhere near as good as its predecessor. It comes with a slew of bugs and regressions inherited from Ubuntu without any validations or checks. The experience is flawed, with middling hardware support, although the rest of the stack is quite reasonable. You get blazing performance, good looks, and decent overall out-of-the-box experience with media and gadgets.

However, that on its own means nothing - because when you compare to Zingy Zorba, this is a release that does everything slightly less well, and it comes with problems and issues we did not have before. Do we really need these hope-killing releases that undo all that's gone before? Xubuntu was really doing well, and then, wham, regressions. Seriously? Why? Anyway, 6/10. Worth testing - better than Ubuntu or Kubuntu of the autumn stock, but still not as good as what we've seen, known and love. Take care, fellow Tuxians.

Read more

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Linux 4.14.2, 4.13.16, 4.9.65, 4.4.101, 4.4.102, and 3.18.84

Filed under
Linux

Security: Necurs, Uber, and Intel ME

Filed under
Security

Graphics: Mesa 17.2.6 RC, AMDGPU, and Vulkan

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Mesa 17.2.6 release candidate
  • Mesa 17.2.6 RC Arrives With 50+ Fixes

    While Mesa 17.3 is imminent and should be released as stable within the next few days, Mesa 17.2.6 is being prepped for release as the current point release.

  • 43 More AMDGPU DC Patches Hit The Streets

    While the massive AMDGPU DC infrastructure has been merged for Linux 4.15, the flow of improvements to this display code continues and it looks like the next few kernel cycles at least could be quite busy on the AMD front.

  • A Prototype Of The Vulkan Portability Initiative: Low-Level 3D To Vulkan / D3D12 / Metal

    A Mozilla engineer has put out a prototype library in working on the Vulkan Portability Initiative for allowing low-level 3D graphics support that's backed by Vulkan / Direct3D 12 / Metal.

    With Apple sticking to their own Metal graphics API and Direct3D 12 still being the dominant graphics API on Windows 10, The Khronos Group has been working towards better 3D portability for where Vulkan may not be directly supported by the OS/drivers or otherwise available. They've been working to target a subset of the Vulkan API that can be efficiently mapped to these other native graphics APIs and to have the libraries and tooling for better compatibility and code re-use of these different graphics APIs.

Kernel: Linux 4.15, TLDR, and Linus Torvalds' Latest Rant

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.15 Adds AMD Raven Ridge Audio ID

    Not only is AMD Stoney Ridge audio (finally) being supported by the Linux 4.15 kernel, but it also looks like Raven Ridge audio should now be working too.

  • Linux 4.14.2 Fixes The BCache Corruption Bug

    Normally I don't bother mentioning new Linux kernel point releases on Phoronix unless there are some significant changes, as is the case today with Linux 4.14.2.

  • TLDR is what Linux man pages always should have been

    If you get stuck using a Linux tool, the first port of call shouldn’t be to Stack Overflow, but rather its “man pages.” Man — which is short for manual — retrieves documentation for a given program. Unfortunately, this can often be dense, hard to understand, and lacking in practical examples to help you solve your problem.

    TLDR is another way of looking at documentation. Rather than being a comprehensive guide to a given tool, it instead focuses on offering practical example-driven instructions of how something works.

  • Linux creator Linus Torvalds: This is what drives me nuts about IT security

    Developers are often accused of not thinking about security, but Linux kernel founder Linus Torvalds has had enough of security people who don't think about developers and end-users.

    After blasting some kernel developers last week for killing processes in the name of hardening the kernel, Torvalds has offered a more measured explanation for his frustration with security myopia.

    While he agrees that having multiple layers of security in the kernel is a good idea, certain ways of implementing it are not, in particular if it annoys users and developers by killing processes that break users' machines and wreck core kernel code. Because ultimately, if there are no users, there's not much point in having a supremely secure kernel, Torvalds contends.

Unity 7 Hoping To Become An Official Flavor For Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu

While Canonical abandoned their work on the Unity desktop environment in favor of the Unity-inspired customized GNOME Shell that debuted in Ubuntu 17.10, some within the community have remained interested in maintaining Unity 7 and even getting it into an official spin/flavor of Ubuntu.

Posted today to the community.ubuntu.com was a Unity maintenance roadmap, reiterating the hope by some in the Ubuntu community for Ubuntu Unity to become an official LTS distribution of Ubuntu. They are hoping to make it an official flavor alongside Kubuntu, Ubuntu Budgie, Xubuntu, and others.

Read more

Original/direct: Unity Maintenance Roadmap

Programming/Development: Django and Google India

Filed under
Development
  • An introduction to the Django ORM

    One of the most powerful features of Django is its Object-Relational Mapper (ORM), which enables you to interact with your database, like you would with SQL. In fact, Django's ORM is just a pythonical way to create SQL to query and manipulate your database and get results in a pythonic fashion. Well, I say just a way, but it's actually really clever engineering that takes advantage of some of the more complex parts of Python to make developers' lives easier.

  • Hey, Coders! Google India Is Offering 130,000 Free Developer Scholarships — Here’s How To Apply
  • Google to prepare 1.3 lakh Indians for emerging technologies

    "The new scholarship programme is in tandem with Google's aim to train two million developers in India. The country is the second largest developer ecosystem in the world and is bound to overtake the US by 2021," William Florance, Developer Products Group and Skilling Lead for India, Google, told reporters here.

Microsoft Bullying and Monkey Business in Munich

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
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More in Tux Machines

Software: VirtualBox, TeX Live Cockpit, Mailspring, Qt, Projects, and Maintainers

  • VirtualBox 5.2.2 Brings Linux 4.14 Fixes, HiDPI UI Improvements
    The Oracle developers behind VM VirtualBox have released a new maintenance build in the VirtualBox 5.2 series that is a bit more exciting than their usual point releases.
  • TeX Live Cockpit
    I have been working quite some time on a new front end for the TeX Live Manager tlmgr. Early versions have leaked into TeX Live, but the last month or two has seen many changes in tlmgr itself, in particular support for JSON output. These changes were mostly driven by the need (or ease) of the new frontend: TLCockpit.
  • Mailspring – A New Open Source Cross-Platform Email Client
    Mailspring is a fork of the now discontinued Nylas Mail client. It does, however, offer a much better performance, and is built with a native C++ sync engine instead of JavaScript. According to the development team, the company is sunsetting further development of Mailspring. Mailspring offers virtually all the best features housed in Nylas Mail, and thanks to its native C++ sync engine it uses fewer dependencies which results in less lag and a reduction in RAM usage by 50% compared to Nylas Mail.
  • Removing Qt 4 from Debian testing (aka Buster): some statistics
    We started filing bugs around September 9. That means roughly 11 weeks, which gives us around 8 packages fixed a week, aka 1.14 packages per day. Not bad at all!
  • Products Over Projects
    However, projects are not the only way of funding and organizing software development. For instance, many companies that sell software as a product or a service do not fund or organize their core product/platform development in the form of projects. Instead, they run product development and support using near-permanent teams for as long as the product is sold in the market. The budget may vary year on year but it is generally sufficient to fund a durable, core development organization continuously for the life of the product. Teams are funded to work on a particular business problem or offering over a period of time; with the nature work being defined by a business problem to address rather than a set of functions to deliver. We call this way of working as “product-mode” and assert that it is not necessary to be building a software product in order to fund and organize software development like this.
  • Why we never thank open source maintainers

    It is true that some of you guys can build a tool in a hackathon, but maintaining a project is a lot more difficult than building a project. Most of the time they are not writing code, but [...]

today's howtos

Tizen News

Mozilla Firefox Quantum

  • Can the new Firefox Quantum regain its web browser market share?
    When Firefox was introduced in 2004, it was designed to be a lean and optimized web browser, based on the bloated code from the Mozilla Suite. Between 2004 and 2009, many considered Firefox to be the best web browser, since it was faster, more secure, offered tabbed browsing and was more customizable through extensions than Microsoft’s Internet Explorer. When Chrome was introduced in 2008, it took many of Firefox’s best ideas and improved on them. Since 2010, Chrome has eaten away at Firefox’s market share, relegating Firefox to a tiny niche of free software enthusiasts and tinkerers who like the customization of its XUL extensions. According to StatCounter, Firefox’s market share of web browsers has fallen from 31.8% in December 2009 to just 6.1% today. Firefox can take comfort in the fact that it is now virtually tied with its former arch-nemesis, Internet Explorer and its variants. All of Microsoft’s browsers only account for 6.2% of current web browsing according to StatCounter. Microsoft has largely been replaced by Google, whose web browsers now controls 56.5% of the market. Even worse, is the fact that the WebKit engine used by Google now represents over 83% of web browsing, so web sites are increasingly focusing on compatibility with just one web engine. While Google and Apple are more supportive of W3C and open standards than Microsoft was in the late 90s, the web is increasingly being monopolized by one web engine and two companies, whose business models are not always based on the best interests of users or their rights.
  • Firefox Nightly Adds CSD Option
    I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Firefox 57 is awesome — so awesome that I’m finally using it as my default browser again. But there is one thing it the Linux version of Firefox sorely needs: client-side decoration.