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Tuesday, 23 May 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Software: NetworkManager, Kodi, Cumulus Weather App, Streamlink, Calibre Rianne Schestowitz 24/05/2017 - 6:48am
Story Security Leftovers: HackerOne, Let's Encrypt, and Shadow Brokers Rianne Schestowitz 24/05/2017 - 6:07am
Story 4 Great Linux Distros Designed for Privacy and Security Rianne Schestowitz 24/05/2017 - 5:53am
Story Linux Foundation and Linux Kernel Rianne Schestowitz 24/05/2017 - 5:45am
Story Red Hat Linux Upgrade Pushes New Security, Automation Tools Rianne Schestowitz 24/05/2017 - 3:50am
Story The History of Ubuntu Linux, Canonical's Open Source OS Rianne Schestowitz 24/05/2017 - 1:09am
Story Tizen News: New Software, Smart TVs, Gear S3 Rianne Schestowitz 24/05/2017 - 12:59am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 24/05/2017 - 12:43am
Story today's howtos Rianne Schestowitz 24/05/2017 - 12:03am
Story LinuxAndUbuntu Distro Review Of The Week - Deepin OS Rianne Schestowitz 23/05/2017 - 11:13pm

Software: NetworkManager, Kodi, Cumulus Weather App, Streamlink, Calibre

Filed under
Software
  • NetworkManager changes and improvements

    NetworkManager is the default service in Fedora for interfacing with the low level networking in the Kernel. It was created to provide a high-level interface for initializing and configuring networking on a system without shell scripts. Over the past few Fedora releases, the NetworkManager developers have put in a lot of effort to make it even better. This article covers some of the major improvements that have been implemented in NetworkManager over the past few Fedora releases.

  • Pioneer Kodi plug-in unplugs

    Developers of the popular Kodi plug-in Navi-X have pulled the plug on further development, citing the "current legal climate" around its work.

    The developers of the plugin, which first appeared a decade ago, state that they're no longer able to host Navi-X programme guides:

  • Cumulus Weather App for Linux Desktop

    ​Once upon a time, there used to be a very popular app called Stormcloud. And then it was no more. With the developer citing a range of issues including issues with the Yahoo API being used and the lack of time on the part of the developer. Some folks in the Linux community tried resurrecting it by creating a fork called Typhoon. And unfortunately, once again, that did not last for a long time. Now another developer by name Daryl Bennett with the aid of the original developer of Stormcloud has resurrected the app, and now it is called Cumulus.

  • Streamlink – Watch Online Video Streams From Command Line

    Streamlink is a command line streaming utility that allows you to watch online video streams in popular media players, such as VLC, MPlayer, MPlayer2, MPC-HC, mpv, Daum Pot Player, QuickTime, and OMXPlayer etc. It is written using Python programming language, and was forked from LiveStreamer, which is no longer maintained. Streamlink currently supports popular live video streaming services, such as YouTube, Dailymotion, Livestream, Twitch, UStream, and many more. Streamlink is built upon a plugin system which allows support for new services to be easily added. A full list of plugins currently included can be found on the Plugins page. Streamlink supports GNU/Linux, *BSDs, Microsoft Windows, and Mac OS X.

  • Linux utils that you might not know
  • Calibre A Free And Open Source Ebook Management System For Linux

    Having ebooks is really a good thing. It can be read anywhere, you get free from the hassle of storage and many more benefits. But it creates a problem when you got an enormous number of ebooks also in various formats. You will have the problem of searching perfect ebook you want to read at a time, you have to maintain various kind of software for every format and much more.

Security Leftovers: HackerOne, Let's Encrypt, and Shadow Brokers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • HackerOne experience with Weblate

    Weblate has started to use HackerOne Community Edition some time ago and I think it's good to share my experience with that. Do you have open source project and want to get more attention of security community? This post will answer how it looks from perspective of pretty small project.

    I've applied with Weblate to HackerOne Community Edition by end of March and it was approved early in April. Based on their recommendations I've started in invite only mode, but that really didn't bring much attention (exactly none reports), so I've decided to go public.

  • Who Are the Shadow Brokers?

    In 2013, a mysterious group of hackers that calls itself the Shadow Brokers stole a few disks full of National Security Agency secrets. Since last summer, they’ve been dumping these secrets on the internet. They have publicly embarrassed the NSA and damaged its intelligence-gathering capabilities, while at the same time have put sophisticated cyberweapons in the hands of anyone who wants them. They have exposed major vulnerabilities in Cisco routers, Microsoft Windows, and Linux mail servers, forcing those companies and their customers to scramble. And they gave the authors of the WannaCry ransomware the exploit they needed to infect hundreds of thousands of computer worldwide this month.

    After the WannaCry outbreak, the Shadow Brokers threatened to release more NSA secrets every month, giving cybercriminals and other governments worldwide even more exploits and hacking tools.

  • Why Akamai Supports Let's Encrypt

    The Let's Encrypt project has re-shaped the market for SSL/TLS certificates, providing millions of free security certificate to organization around the world.

    Among the many backers of Let's Encrypt is content delivery network platform provider Akamai. In a video interview with eSecurityPlanet, Andy Ellis, Chief Security Officer at Akamai, explains why Let's Encrypt matters and his view on the effort's real value.

  • Security in Serverless: What Gets Better, What Gets Worse?
  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 48 - Machine Learning: Not actually magic

    Josh and Kurt have a guest! Mike Paquette from Elastic discusses the fundamentals and basics of Machine Learning. We also discuss how ML could have helped with WannaCry.

4 Great Linux Distros Designed for Privacy and Security

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

Conventional security measures like antivirus programs are behind the curve when it comes to modern hackers and malware. Unfortunately, antivirus software and firewalls give users a false sense of security. In reality, new threats are being developed and unleashed into the wild every single day, and even the best antivirus programs have to play catchup.

Recent ransomware attacks (aka. WannaCry) have targeted Windows-based PCs in over 150 countries – cyber security and privacy is incredibly important. Windows and macOS are easy to use and popular; however, they are much more susceptible to malicious code.

Linux is free and open source, which means there are hundreds of “flavors.” These individual distributions are tweaked to different specifications. Security-focused users will be pleased to know that there are a number of Linux distros designed with security and privacy in mind.

Read more

Linux Foundation and Linux Kernel

Filed under
Linux
  • General Manager of Training at The Linux Foundation Forecasts Cloudy Weather

    Where does The Linux Foundation believe ones time is well spent to catapult their career objectives? It is fairly apparent after reaching out to Clyde Seepersad, General Manager Training and Certification of The Linux Foundation, the cloud is the place to be. When communicating with him on a variety of topics that revolve around The Linux Foundation's certification offerings and education, the central point of focus is the cloud. Clyde provided us with a slew of information about The Linux Foundation's efforts to make sure FLOSS continues to succeed for the foreseeable future.

  • Linux Foundation LFCS and LFCE Pratik Tolia Plans to Become Authorized Instructor

    The Linux Foundation offers many resources for developers, users, and administrators of Linux systems. One of the most important offerings is its Linux Certification Program, which is designed to give you a way to differentiate yourself in a job market that's hungry for your skills.

  • Hughes: Updating Logitech Hardware on Linux

    Logitech has provided firmware updates, but not for "unsupported" platforms like Linux. Hughes has filled that gap by getting documentation and a fixed firmware image from Logitech and adding support for these devices to fwupd. He is now looking for testers to ensure that the whole thing works across all devices. This is important work that is well worth supporting.

  • Updating Logitech Hardware on Linux

    This gave an attacker with $15 of hardware the ability to basically take over remote PCs within wireless range, which could be up to 50m away. This makes sitting in a café quite a dangerous thing to do when any affected hardware is inserted, which for the unifying dongle is quite likely as it’s explicitly designed to remain in an empty USB socket. The main manufacturer of these devices is Logitech, but the hardware is also supplied to other OEMs such as Amazon, Microsoft, Lenovo and Dell where they are re-badged or renamed. I don’t think anybody knows the real total, but by my estimations there must be tens of millions of affected-and-unpatched devices being used every day.

  • An introduction to Libral, a systems management library for Linux

    Linux, in keeping with Unix traditions, doesn't have a comprehensive systems management API. Instead, management is done through a variety of special-purpose tools and APIs, all with their own conventions and idiosyncrasies. That makes scripting even simple systems-management tasks difficult and brittle.

  • Linux Kernel 4.11.2-1 released
  • Cgroups/namespaces/seccomp/capabilities course
  • Linux Shared Libraries course, Munich, Germany, 20 July 2017

    I've scheduled a public instance of my "Building and Using Shared Libraries on Linux" course to take place in Munich, Germany on 20 July 2017. This one-day course provides a thorough introduction to building and using shared libraries. covering topics such as: the basics of creating, installing, and using shared libraries; shared library versioning and naming conventions; the role of the dynamic linker; run-time symbol resolution; controlling symbol visibility; symbol versioning; preloading shared libraries; and dynamically loaded libraries (dlopen). The course format is a mixture of theory and practical.

Red Hat Linux Upgrade Pushes New Security, Automation Tools

Filed under
Red Hat

Red Hat on Tuesday announced the availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.4 beta.

RHEL 7.4 includes new security and compliance features and streamlined automation, along with tools for improved systems administration.

This latest upgrade comes nearly three years into the series 7 lifecycle. It continues to provide enterprises with a rich and stable foundation for both existing applications and a new generation of workloads and solutions.

Read more

The History of Ubuntu Linux, Canonical's Open Source OS

Filed under
Ubuntu

In October 2004 the first Ubuntu release, Ubuntu 4.10, debuted. Codenamed Warty Warthog because it was rough around the edges, Ubuntu 4.10 inaugurated a tradition of releasing new version of Ubuntu each April and October that Canonical has maintained up to the present -- with the exception of Ubuntu 6.06, which came out a couple of months late in 2006.

Ubuntu 4.04 launched six months after Mark Shuttleworth first met with Debian developers to discuss the creation of a new, Debian-based Linux distribution that would emphasize ease-of-use, regular release cycles, accessibility and internationalization.

Read more

Tizen News: New Software, Smart TVs, Gear S3

Filed under
Linux

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android
  • Pimp your smartphone with the latest Android O Pixel launcher

    If your device is running Android 6.0.1 Marshmallow or above, you can now pimp it out with the latest Google O Pixel launcher. One of the contributors on the XDA Developers forum has recently posted the APK file, which you can install on your smartphone.

    Before you download the file, make sure your device can install apps that aren’t listed on the Play Store. To do so, open up the Settings menu, tap on Security, and enable the “Unknown sources” option. Once that’s done, all you have to do is download the file and then tap on it in the notification shade to install the launcher on your device.

  • Google is killing off Android's emoji blobs

    The best emojis on the market are no more: Google’s weird blobs are being retired in favour of more conventional circular yellow faces.

  • Google I/O: What about Android on Chrome OS?

    The hottest tech-show ticket these days is Google I/O. In the just-finished 2017 conference, Google announced lots of great stuff, including a lightweight version of Android, Android Go; a first look at the next version of Android, Android O; and a major upgrade to Google Home. One thing that was noticeably missing, however: big news about Android apps on Chrome OS.

  • RaspAnd Marshmallow 6.0.1 Android OS Now Available for Raspberry Pi 3 and 2 SBCs

    After informing us about the availability of a new build of his RaspAnd Nougat operating system for Raspberry Pi 3 and 2 SBCs based on Android 7.1.2, Arne Exton released an updated RaspAnd Marshmallow 6 version.

LinuxAndUbuntu Distro Review Of The Week - Deepin OS

Filed under
Reviews

​Depth/Deepin OS is not just another Linux Distro, but one with something new to show. Deepin OS is simply speaking, just beautiful. Deepin OS, formerly known as Deepin, Linux Deepin, and Hiweed GNU/Linux is a Linux distro with an identity crisis. Seriously, this distro has undergone name changes you always have to check twice if the name is still the same. And that is all the negative you are going to say about this distro. Honestly speaking, Deepin OS is surely going to blow you away. I have been keeping an eye on this distro since 2013 and it still manages to impress me.

Read more

KDE Leftovers: digikam, KDevelop, Kate, GSoC, and Akademy

Filed under
KDE
  • [digikam] Call to Test the Pre-Release of 5.6.0

    Once again a lot has been going on behind the scenes since the last release. The HTML gallery tool is back, database shrinking (e.g. purging stale thumbnails) is also supported on MySQL, grouping has been improved and additional sidecars can now be specified. Therefore the release of 5.6.0 will be (is already) delayed, as we would like to invite you to test all these features. As usual they are available in the pre-release bundles or obviously directly from the git repository. Please report any dysfunctions, unexpected behaviour or suggestions for improvement to our bug tracker.

  • KDevelop runtimes: Docker and Flatpak integration

    On my last blog post I discussed about how some assumptions such as the platform developed on can affect our development. We need to minimize it by empowering the developers with good tools so that they can develop properly. To that end, I introduced runtimes in our IDE to abstract platforms (much like on Gnome’s Builder or Qt Creator).

  • Kate 17.04.1 available for Windows
  • GSoC - Community Bonding Period with Krita
  • First month report: my feelings about gsoc
  • My Akademy Plans

    The Akademy programme (saturday, sunday) is actually pretty long; the conference days stretch into feels-like-evening to me. Of course, the Dutch are infamous for being “6pm at the dinner table, and eat potatoes” so my notion of evening may not match what works on the Mediterranean coast. Actually, I know it doesn’t since way back when at a Ubuntu Developer Summit in Sevilla it took some internal-clock-resetting to adjust to dinner closer to midnight than 18:00.

Gaming News: Shogun, SteamOS, Dawn Of War III

Filed under
Gaming

Galicia continues promotion of free software

Filed under
OSS

The government of the autonomous region of Galicia (Spain) will continue to encourage the use of free and open source software solutions in the public and private sector. This week, the government published the ‘Free Software Plan 2017’, outlining 110 actions.

In its ‘Plan de acción software libre 2017’, Galicia announces new initiatives to promote sharing and reuse of ICT solutions. The government is to share new software solutions, but will also emphasise the reuse of existing tools, pointing to Mancomún, the region’s software repository, the catalogue maintained by the Spanish central government’s Centre for Technology Transfer, and to the European Commission’s Joinup eGovernment portal.

Read more

Linux Devices: Raspberry Pi, PIC32, Lime Micro

Filed under
Hardware
  • Apollo Lake COM Express module has onboard microSD and eMMC

    The COM Express Compact Type 6 “MSC C6C-AL” taps Intel’s Apollo Lake and offers up to 16GB DDR3L, microSD and optional eMMC, plus support for 5x PCIe slots.

  • How to create an Internet-in-a-Box on a Raspberry Pi

    If you're a homeschool parent or a teacher with a limited budget, Internet-in-a-Box might be just what you've been looking for. Its hardware requirements are very modest—a Raspberry Pi 3, a 64GB microSD card, and a power supply—but it provides access to a wealth of educational resources, even to students without internet access in the most remote areas of the world.

  • Squeeze Pi: Adventures in home audio

    The Squeezebox Touch provided a family-friendly interface to access our music library, either directly on the device or via a range of mobile applications. Logitech discontinued its development in 2012, but I was happy as they open sourced the Squeezebox's server software as Logitech Media Server and supplied the open source code used on the physical Squeezebox devices.

  • Evaluating PIC32 for Hardware Experiments

    PIC32 uses the MIPS32 instruction set. Since MIPS has been around for a very long time, and since the architecture was prominent in workstations, servers and even games consoles in the late 1980s and 1990s, remaining in widespread use in more constrained products such as routers as this century has progressed, the GNU toolchain (GCC, binutils) has had a long time to comfortably support MIPS. Although the computer you are using is not particularly likely to be MIPS-based, cross-compiling versions of these tools can be built to run on, say, x86 or x86-64 while generating MIPS32 executable programs.

  • Want a Raspberry Pi-powered PC? This $50 case turns the Pi into a desktop

    As long as you keep your expectations in check, it's perfectly feasible to run the latest Raspberry Pi as a desktop computer.

    However, the base Raspberry Pi 3 is a bare bones board, so anyone wanting to set it up as a desktop PC will need to buy their own case and other add-ons.

  • Open source LimeNET SDR computers run Ubuntu Core on Intel Core

    Lime Micro has launched three open source “LimeNET” SDR systems that run Ubuntu Core on Intel Core CPUs, including one with a new LimeSDR QPCIe board.

    Lime Microsystems has gone to Crowd Supply to launch three fully open source LimeNET computers for software defined radio (SDR) applications. The systems run Ubuntu “Snappy” Core Linux on Intel’s Core processors, enabling access to an open, community-based LimeSDR App Store using the Ubuntu Core snap packaging and update technology. The SDR processing is handled by three variations on last year’s open source LimeSDR board, which run Intel’s (Altera) Cyclone IV FPGA.

Server: Data Centres, Google, SDN, Amazon, and Microsoft

Filed under
Server
  • Data Center Networking Performance: New Apps Bring New Requirements

    Large cloud services providers such as Amazon, Google, Baidu, and Tencent have reinvented the way in which IT services can be delivered, with capabilities that go beyond scale in terms of sheer size to also include scale as it pertains to speed and agility. That’s put traditional carriers on notice: John Donovan, chief strategy officer and group president at AT&T technology and operations, for instance, said last year that AT&T wants to be the “most aggressive IT company in the world.” He noted that in a world where over-the-top (OTT) offerings have become commonplace, application and services development can no longer be defined by legacy processes.

  • Google Reveals a Powerful New AI Chip and Supercomputer

    The announcement reflects how rapidly artificial intelligence is transforming Google itself, and it is the surest sign yet that the company plans to lead the development of every relevant aspect of software and hardware.

    Perhaps most importantly, for those working in machine learning at least, the new processor not only executes at blistering speed, it can also be trained incredibly efficiently. Called the Cloud Tensor Processing Unit, the chip is named after Google’s open-source TensorFlow machine-learning framework.

  • Google's AlphaGo AI is about to face off against the world's best Go player

    This week, the matter will be settled once and for all. Ke Jie and AlphaGo will face off in a three-game match in Wuzhen, China, as part of the Future of Go Summit being held by Google.

  • Keynote: Cloud Native Networking- Amin Vahdat, Fellow & Technical Lead For Networking, Google
  • Google's Networking Lead Talks SDN Challenges for the Next Decade
  • Peace, love and SDN

    Virtualization has been a blessing for data centers – thanks to the humble hypervisor, we can create, move and rearrange computers on a whim, without thinking about the physical infrastructure.

    The simplicity and efficiency of VMs has prompted network engineers to envision a programmable, flexible network based on open protocols and REST APIs that could be managed from a single interface, without worrying about each router and switch.

  • Bryan Cantrill on Integrity

    Amazon has 14 leadership principles and integrity is not on it.

  • Bankrupt school ITT pleads 'don't let Microsoft wipe our cloud data!'

    The estate of bankrupt US trade school ITT Technical Institutes is today asking a court to stop Microsoft from erasing its cloud data.

    In a filing [PDF] to the US District Bankruptcy Court of Southern Indiana, the caretakers of the defunct for-profit university seek an order to bar the Redmond giant from wiping the contents of ITT's Office 365 and webmail accounts for students, faculty, and administrators.

Security Leftovers: WannaCry, Windows in Linux, Windows 7, Windows 10 is Spyware

Filed under
Security

Gaming News: SHOGUN, Reus, Two Worlds and More

Filed under
Gaming

Security Leftovers: WCry/Ransomwar, WannaCry, Athena

Filed under
Security
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More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation and Linux Kernel

  • General Manager of Training at The Linux Foundation Forecasts Cloudy Weather
    Where does The Linux Foundation believe ones time is well spent to catapult their career objectives? It is fairly apparent after reaching out to Clyde Seepersad, General Manager Training and Certification of The Linux Foundation, the cloud is the place to be. When communicating with him on a variety of topics that revolve around The Linux Foundation's certification offerings and education, the central point of focus is the cloud. Clyde provided us with a slew of information about The Linux Foundation's efforts to make sure FLOSS continues to succeed for the foreseeable future.
  • Linux Foundation LFCS and LFCE Pratik Tolia Plans to Become Authorized Instructor
    The Linux Foundation offers many resources for developers, users, and administrators of Linux systems. One of the most important offerings is its Linux Certification Program, which is designed to give you a way to differentiate yourself in a job market that's hungry for your skills.
  • Hughes: Updating Logitech Hardware on Linux
    Logitech has provided firmware updates, but not for "unsupported" platforms like Linux. Hughes has filled that gap by getting documentation and a fixed firmware image from Logitech and adding support for these devices to fwupd. He is now looking for testers to ensure that the whole thing works across all devices. This is important work that is well worth supporting.
  • Updating Logitech Hardware on Linux
    This gave an attacker with $15 of hardware the ability to basically take over remote PCs within wireless range, which could be up to 50m away. This makes sitting in a café quite a dangerous thing to do when any affected hardware is inserted, which for the unifying dongle is quite likely as it’s explicitly designed to remain in an empty USB socket. The main manufacturer of these devices is Logitech, but the hardware is also supplied to other OEMs such as Amazon, Microsoft, Lenovo and Dell where they are re-badged or renamed. I don’t think anybody knows the real total, but by my estimations there must be tens of millions of affected-and-unpatched devices being used every day.
  • An introduction to Libral, a systems management library for Linux
    Linux, in keeping with Unix traditions, doesn't have a comprehensive systems management API. Instead, management is done through a variety of special-purpose tools and APIs, all with their own conventions and idiosyncrasies. That makes scripting even simple systems-management tasks difficult and brittle.
  • Linux Kernel 4.11.2-1 released
  • Cgroups/namespaces/seccomp/capabilities course
  • Linux Shared Libraries course, Munich, Germany, 20 July 2017
    I've scheduled a public instance of my "Building and Using Shared Libraries on Linux" course to take place in Munich, Germany on 20 July 2017. This one-day course provides a thorough introduction to building and using shared libraries. covering topics such as: the basics of creating, installing, and using shared libraries; shared library versioning and naming conventions; the role of the dynamic linker; run-time symbol resolution; controlling symbol visibility; symbol versioning; preloading shared libraries; and dynamically loaded libraries (dlopen). The course format is a mixture of theory and practical.

Red Hat Linux Upgrade Pushes New Security, Automation Tools

Red Hat on Tuesday announced the availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.4 beta. RHEL 7.4 includes new security and compliance features and streamlined automation, along with tools for improved systems administration. This latest upgrade comes nearly three years into the series 7 lifecycle. It continues to provide enterprises with a rich and stable foundation for both existing applications and a new generation of workloads and solutions. Read more

The History of Ubuntu Linux, Canonical's Open Source OS

In October 2004 the first Ubuntu release, Ubuntu 4.10, debuted. Codenamed Warty Warthog because it was rough around the edges, Ubuntu 4.10 inaugurated a tradition of releasing new version of Ubuntu each April and October that Canonical has maintained up to the present -- with the exception of Ubuntu 6.06, which came out a couple of months late in 2006. Ubuntu 4.04 launched six months after Mark Shuttleworth first met with Debian developers to discuss the creation of a new, Debian-based Linux distribution that would emphasize ease-of-use, regular release cycles, accessibility and internationalization. Read more

Tizen News: New Software, Smart TVs, Gear S3