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Friday, 29 Apr 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story GNOME privacy options give users even more desktop security Rianne Schestowitz 29/04/2016 - 9:35pm
Story FRAND Is Not A Compliance Issue Roy Schestowitz 29/04/2016 - 9:12pm
Story GNOME 3.21.1 released Rianne Schestowitz 29/04/2016 - 8:46pm
Story Chromium OS comes to Raspberry Pi 3 Rianne Schestowitz 29/04/2016 - 8:44pm
Story Casio Smart Outdoor Watch review: Android Wear climbs a mountain Rianne Schestowitz 29/04/2016 - 8:39pm
Story Gabriele Trombini: How do you Fedora? Rianne Schestowitz 29/04/2016 - 1:26pm
Story Development News Roy Schestowitz 29/04/2016 - 11:38am
Story RMS Receives Award (and more GNU news) Roy Schestowitz 29/04/2016 - 11:37am
Story Fairphone's Google-free open source OS is now available to download Roy Schestowitz 29/04/2016 - 11:28am
Story Fedora 24 Delayed, Linus the Tops, New openSUSE Team Roy Schestowitz 29/04/2016 - 8:54am

GNOME privacy options give users even more desktop security

Filed under
GNOME

GNOME is helping you to improve security by wiping away that breadcrumb trail. Instead of having to manage these issues in various places such as display settings, file manager, and location settings, the developers of GNOME put these security-centric settings in one location: the GNOME Privacy tool.

Read more

FRAND Is Not A Compliance Issue

Filed under
OSS
Legal

The European Commission has been persuaded by lobbyists to change its position on standards to permit the use of FRAND license terms for patents applicable to technologies within those standards. This is a massive mistake that will harm innovation by chilling open source community engagement.

Read more

GNOME 3.21.1 released

Filed under
GNOME

Hi GNOMEers!

development of the next GNOME release, 3.22, has started, and the
first snapshot, 3.21.1, is now available. This is a very early snapshot,
and not too much has landed yet; I expect that to change soon.

To compile GNOME 3.21.1, you can use the jhbuild [1] modulesets [2]
(which use the exact tarball versions from the official release).

Read more

Chromium OS comes to Raspberry Pi 3

Filed under
OS
Linux

Chromium OS for SBCs has been released in v0.5 for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The Pine64 appears to be next up, with other hacker SBCs waiting in line.

The “Chromium OS for Single Board Computers” project, which is taking the open source Chromium OS progenitor of Chrome OS, and tuning it for SBCs, released v0.5 for the Raspberry Pi 2 and Raspberry Pi 3. This is the first official release for the RPi 3.

Read more

Casio Smart Outdoor Watch review: Android Wear climbs a mountain

Filed under
Android
Reviews

Casio deserves a lot of credit for reshaping Android Wear into an original and unique new product, something I wasn’t sure was possible. It overcomes many of the drawbacks of smartwatches while making total sense as a product in its category; if you’re in the market for a hiking watch that also works as a smartwatch, and you use an Android phone, I think you’ll be very happy with what Casio’s produced. If you’re not looking specifically for a hiking smartwatch? Maybe wait and see if Casio ever makes a G-Shock smartwatch, because this one really isn’t the sort of thing you’ll want to wear every day.

Read more

Gabriele Trombini: How do you Fedora?

Filed under
Red Hat
Interviews

Gabriele is a Fedora Ambassador who works both locally and internationally. He is most impressed by the jovial and warm atmosphere within the project. Everyone can share suggestions, opinions and information in a friendly, collaborative environment. Trombini stresses that respect and the willingness to change are necessary to keep the Fedora Community strong. “Let’s try something, and if it doesn’t return the expected results, we should be ready to change our way,” says Trombini.

Read more

Development News

Filed under
Development
  • PHP version 5.5.35, 5.6.21 and 7.0.6
  • Learn Perl Online for Free
  • Top Ten Programmers of All Time

    3. Linus Torvalds

    The man who created Linux Kernel. Linux operating system is a clone to the Unix operating system, written originally by Linus Torvalds and a loosely knit team of programmers all around the world.

    [...]

    5. Richard Stallman

    He founded the Free Software Foundation, developed the GNU Compiler Collection(GCC). Richard Stallman is the prophet of the free software movement. He understood the dangers of software patents years ago. Now that this has become a crucial issue in the world. He has hugely successful efforts to establish the idea of “Free Software”.

RMS Receives Award (and more GNU news)

Filed under
GNU
  • ACM RECOGNIZES MAJOR TECHNICAL CONTRIBUTIONS THAT HAVE ADVANCED THE COMPUTING FIELD

    Richard Stallman, recipient of the ACM Software System Award for the development and leadership of GCC (GNU Compiler Collection), which has enabled extensive software and hardware innovation, and has been a lynchpin of the free software movement. A compiler is a computer program that takes the source code of another program and translates it into machine code that a computer can run directly. GCC compiles code in various programming languages, including Ada, C, C++, Cobol, Java, and FORTRAN. It produces machine code for many kinds of computers, and can run on Unix and GNU/Linux systems as well as others.

    GCC was developed for the GNU operating system, which includes thousands of programs from various projects, including applications, libraries, tools such as GCC, and even games. Most importantly, the GNU system is entirely free (libre) software, which means users are free to run all these programs, to study and change their source code, and to redistribute copies with or without changes. GNU is usually used with the kernel, Linux. Stallman has previously been recognized with ACM’s Grace Murray Hopper Award.

  • Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup: April 29th
  • Tumbleweed gets glibc 2.23

    There has not been a new snapshot for openSUSE Tumbleweed for the past week, and it has been a couple weeks since the last time it was discussed on news.opensuse.org.

    A new snapshot of Tumbleweed arrived today and the reason for not having one the past week is that the entire rolling release distribution was rebuilt on the Open Build Service and thoroughly tested by openQA.

Fairphone's Google-free open source OS is now available to download

Filed under
Android

Phone manufacturer Fairphone is all about making smartphones that are as accessible and ethical as possible. This includes trying to find conflict-free minerals for use in their phones' construction, but also the software that lives on these devices. Yesterday, the company released its own open source Fairphone OS — an Android-based operating system that doesn't include Google services. This means users will have to find their own apps for email, maps, and a browser, but in exchange they get more control over their software.

Read more

Fedora 24 Delayed, Linus the Tops, New openSUSE Team

Filed under
-s

Fedora Program Manager Jan Kuřík today announced a delay in Fedora 24, both the upcoming Beta and Final. Elsewhere openSUSE announced a new community release team, a group of volunteers to help with the release tasks. Linus Torvalds and Richard Stallman both appeared on a "top 10 programmers of all time" list and a Windows 10 upgrade screen has gone viral.

Read more

elementary OS 0.4 "Loki" to Be Based on Ubuntu 16.04, Promises Big New Features

Filed under
Linux

A year ago, we were bold enough to predict that the next release of the elementary OS distribution would be version 0.4, dubbed Loki and based on the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS operating system.

Read more

Debian-Based SparkyLinux 4.3 "Tyche" Distro Launches with Linux Kernel 4.5.1

Filed under
Debian

Today, April 29, 2016, the SparkyLinux development team was proud to announce the release of the SparkyLinux 4.3 "Tyche" operating system, which has been in development for the past few months.

Read more

Why and how I became a software engineer

Filed under
OSS

Throughout my experiences, the fascinating weeks I'd spent writing out DOS commands remained a prominent influence, bleeding into little side projects and occupying valuable study time. As soon as Geocities became available to all Yahoo! Users, I created a website where I published blurry pictures that I'd taken on a tiny digital camera. I created websites for free, helped friends and family fix issues they had with their computers, and created a library database for a church.

This meant that I was always researching and trying to find more information about how things could be made better. The Internet gods blessed me and open source fell into my lap. Suddenly, 30-day trials and restrictive licenses became a ghost of computing past. I could continue to create using GIMP, Inkscape, and OpenOffice.

Read more

Linux Kernel 3.18.32 LTS Released with Btrfs, EXT4, ARM, x86, and PA-RISC Fixes

Filed under
Linux

Immediately after announcing today the release of Linux kernel 4.1.23 LTS, and after informing us yesterday about the availability of Linux kernel 3.12.59 LTS, kernel developer Sasha Levin now published details about Linux kernel 3.18.32 LTS.

Read more

Linux greybeards release beta of systemd-free Debian fork

Filed under
Linux
Debian

The effort to create a systemd-free Debian fork has borne fruit, with a beta of “Devuan Jessie” appearing in the wild.

Devuan came into being after a rebellion by a self-described “Veteran Unix Admin collective” argued that Debian had betrayed its roots and was becoming too desktop-oriented. The item to which they objected most vigorously was the inclusion of the systemd bootloader. The rebels therefore decided to fork Debian and “preserve Init freedom”. The group renamed itself and its distribution “Devuan” and got work, promising a fork that looked, felt, and quacked like Debian in all regards other than imposing systemd as the default Init option.

Read more

GNOME Builder 3.20.2 Arrives with LLVM 3.8, FreeBSD and OpenBSD Support

Filed under
GNOME

The developers behind the GNOME Builder IDE (Integrated Development Environment) pushed earlier to updates of the software to the stable and devel channels, GNOME Build 3.20.2 and 3.21.1.

Read more

Nautilus 3.20.1 File Manager Out Now, Lets Users Move Items to Network Locations

Filed under
GNOME

The GNOME 3.20.1 desktop environment was released two weeks ago with numerous updated components, but it looks like some of them are yet to receive their first point releases.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Fresh Mesa 11.3-devel RadeonSI Tests On Ubuntu 16.04 vs. NVIDIA's 364.19 Driver

    For some end-of-month benchmarks and while having a number of graphics cards out prior to being let down by Tomb Raider's Linux benchmark, here is a fresh round of OpenGL tests while using the newest Mesa 11.3-devel code on RadeonSI with AMDGPU/Radeon DRM from Ubuntu 16.04 and then compared to various Kepler/Maxwell graphics cards with the newest NVIDIA Linux driver.

  • Oracle Releases VirtualBox 5.0.20 with Fixes for Linux Kernel 4.5, Small Changes

    Today, April 28, 2016, Oracle has announced the release of VirtualBox 5.0.20, yet another maintenance version of its acclaimed open-source and cross-platform virtualization software.

  • pcp+grafana scripted dashboards

    Our previous work gluing Performance Co-Pilot and Grafana together has made it possible to look at a networkful of systems' performance stats and histories with just a few clicks on a web browser, and no auxiliary software (databases, web servers, etc.) other than PCP itself.

    Many people probably stopped at the most basic use of the technology: with the grafana dashboards provided.

  • How to build your own IRC Server with InspIRCd and Anope
  • How To Install Linux Mint Alongside Windows 10 (UEFI)
  • Tails 2.3 Screenshot Tour
  • openSUSE announces Community Release Team

    The openSUSE Board announced today a call to action for a Community Release Team to assist with tasks associated to the development of the next Leap version 42.2.

  • Mele introduces a $70 Ubuntu stick PC

    The Meizu Pro 5U smartphone puts Ubuntu in your pocket, but you can’t use it as a desktop computer. Fortunately you’ve got other pockets, and you can stuff the Mele PCG02U into one them.

    The PCG02U is an HDMI stick PC, and if you hadn’t guessed from the U at the end of its name or that unmistakable orange color (or, more obviously, the title of this post) it is indeed powered by Ubuntu — Ubuntu 14.04 to be precise. It’s on sale now, and you can pick one up for just $70.

  • Samsung Unveils New Artik Module Tools for IoT Developers

    A new Artik IDE development environment and the Artik Cloud give developers new capabilities with Artik modules.
    Samsung has given Internet of things developers several new tools to create and grow their ideas for new devices and concepts, including the Samsung Artik IDE (integrated development environment) and an IoT-focused Samsung Artik Cloud where developers can collect, store and access their data from any device or other cloud.

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
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More in Tux Machines

Chromium OS comes to Raspberry Pi 3

Chromium OS for SBCs has been released in v0.5 for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The Pine64 appears to be next up, with other hacker SBCs waiting in line. The “Chromium OS for Single Board Computers” project, which is taking the open source Chromium OS progenitor of Chrome OS, and tuning it for SBCs, released v0.5 for the Raspberry Pi 2 and Raspberry Pi 3. This is the first official release for the RPi 3. Read more

Casio Smart Outdoor Watch review: Android Wear climbs a mountain

Casio deserves a lot of credit for reshaping Android Wear into an original and unique new product, something I wasn’t sure was possible. It overcomes many of the drawbacks of smartwatches while making total sense as a product in its category; if you’re in the market for a hiking watch that also works as a smartwatch, and you use an Android phone, I think you’ll be very happy with what Casio’s produced. If you’re not looking specifically for a hiking smartwatch? Maybe wait and see if Casio ever makes a G-Shock smartwatch, because this one really isn’t the sort of thing you’ll want to wear every day. Read more

Gabriele Trombini: How do you Fedora?

Gabriele is a Fedora Ambassador who works both locally and internationally. He is most impressed by the jovial and warm atmosphere within the project. Everyone can share suggestions, opinions and information in a friendly, collaborative environment. Trombini stresses that respect and the willingness to change are necessary to keep the Fedora Community strong. “Let’s try something, and if it doesn’t return the expected results, we should be ready to change our way,” says Trombini. Read more

Development News

  • PHP version 5.5.35, 5.6.21 and 7.0.6
  • Learn Perl Online for Free
  • Top Ten Programmers of All Time
    3. Linus Torvalds The man who created Linux Kernel. Linux operating system is a clone to the Unix operating system, written originally by Linus Torvalds and a loosely knit team of programmers all around the world. [...] 5. Richard Stallman He founded the Free Software Foundation, developed the GNU Compiler Collection(GCC). Richard Stallman is the prophet of the free software movement. He understood the dangers of software patents years ago. Now that this has become a crucial issue in the world. He has hugely successful efforts to establish the idea of “Free Software”.