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Tuesday, 23 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Red Hat News

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Red Hat

Mozilla Development

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Moz/FF
  • Firefox’s continued Quantum transformation—more multithreading, tracking protection

    Firefox 58, out today, continues to deliver Project Quantum, Mozilla's far-reaching modernization effort that's boosting the browser's performance, security, and maintainability. The initiative allows Firefox to take better advantage of modern multicore processors and makes the browser better suited to the demands of today's Web applications.

  • MozMEAO SRE Status Report - January 23, 2018

    Here’s what happened on the MozMEAO SRE team from December 2017 - January 23.

  • WebRender capture infrastructure

    For over a year now, I’ve been hacking on WebRender. It was born in Servo as an experimental way to batch the painting and compositing of the web content on GPU. Today it’s a solid piece of engineering that’s going to mainline Firefox as the next big Rust-written component within the Quantum project. You can read more about WebRender on our team’s blog as well as this wonderfully illustrated article by Lin Clark.

  • The Different Types of Privacy Protection

    Many of your favorite sites keep track of what you do online. They may do it to understand if you’re interested in a particular article, item or activity. They may do it to make your experience of their site easier. They may also track you so they can try to sell you things.

    Online ads can be customized on the fly based on what you do. Been searching for a new pair of Chucks? Mega Shoe Company has a great deal for you. To serve those custom ads at just the right time, the shoe company needs to know where you go online. Is that bad? Some argue that customized (targeted) ads are much better than traditional billboards or radio spots. At least with targeted ads, there’s a good chance you’ve been looking for what they’re selling. But you may not want companies following you around the web.

  • Introducing the MDN Product Advisory Board: actions and impressions from our first meeting

    On January 11th, 2018, Mozilla held the first in-person meeting of the MDN Product Advisory Board (PAB) in London. The goal of the MDN Product Advisory Board, in collaboration with Microsoft, Google, and other industry leaders, is to provide guidance that helps MDN be the best reference for web developers.

    To that end, I’m pleased to announce that the web platform consultancy Bocoup, represented by Rick Waldron, will be joining the MDN Product Advisory Board starting in February. Bocoup brings a practitioner’s perspective to the the standards process and participates in a wide range of open source projects. Rick has actively contributed to MDN since May of 2011, writing documentation, reviewing contributions, and participating in the maintenance of the JavaScript Reference sub-articles. He’s written proposals and specifications for new JavaScript APIs and syntax, participated in ECMAScript® 2015, 2016, 2017 Language Specifications, and represents Bocoup at ECMA TC39 meetings. I’m very excited Rick will be adding his considerable industry knowledge and JavaScript focus to the board and look forward to him joining our next meeting.

Linux 4.14.15, 4.9.78, and 4.4.113

Filed under
Linux

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Initial Retpoline Support Added To LLVM For Spectre v2 Mitigation

    The LLVM code has been merged to mainline for the Retpoline x86 mitigation technique for Spectre Variant 2. This will be back-ported to LLVM 6.0 and also LLVM 5.0 with an immediate point release expected to get this patched compiler out in the wild.

    The compiler-side work -- similar to GCC's Retpoline code -- is to avoid generating code where an indirect branch could have its prediction poisoned by a rogue actor. The Retpoline support uses indirect calls in a non-speculatable way.

  • Teen Hacker Who Social Engineered His Way Into Top-Level US Government Officials' Accounts Pleads Guilty To Ten Charges

    The teenage hacker who tore CIA director John Brennan a new AOL-hole is awaiting sentencing in the UK. Kane Gamble, the apparent founder of hacker collective Crackas With Attitude, was able to access classified documents Brennan has forwarded to his personal email account by posing as a Verizon tech. Social engineering is still the best hacking tool. It's something anyone anywhere can do. If you do it well, a whole host of supposedly-secured information can be had, thanks to multiple entities relying on the same personal identifiers to "verify" the social engineer they're talking to is the person who owns accounts they're granting access to.

    Despite claiming he was motivated by American injustices perpetrated around the world (Palestine is namechecked in the teen's multiple mini-manifestos), a lot of what Gamble participated in was plain, old fashioned harassment.

  • The Guardian view on cyberwar: an urgent problem [Ed: Lists several attacks by Microsoft Windows (but names neither)]

    The first known, and perhaps the most successful of these, was the joint US/Israeli Stuxnet attack on the Iranian nuclear programme in 2009. Since then there has been increasing evidence of attacks of this sort by Russia – against Estonia in 2009, and then against Ukraine, where tens of thousands of attacks on everything from power supplies to voting machines have opened an under-reported front in an under-reported war. Across the Baltic, the Swedish government has just announced a beefed-up programme of civil defence, of which the most substantial part will be an attempt to protect its software and networks from attacks. Meanwhile, North Korean state hackers are blamed by western intelligence services for the WannaCry ransomware attacks which last year shut down several NHS hospitals in the UK. Persistent reports suggest the US has interfered in this way with North Korea’s nuclear missile programme.

  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #143
  • Don’t Install Meltdown And Spectre Patches, Intel Warns It Would Increase System Reebots
  • On that Spectre mitigations discussion

    By now, almost everybody has probably seen the press coverage of Linus Torvalds's remarks about one of the patches addressing Spectre variant 2. Less noted, but much more informative, is David Woodhouse's response on why those patches are the way they are.

Tails 3.5 Anonymous OS Released to Mitigate Spectre Vulnerability for AMD CPUs

Filed under
Security
Debian

Tails, the open-source Linux-based operating system designed to protect user's privacy while surfing the Internet, also known as Anonymous OS, was updated today to version 3.5.

Coming only two weeks after the Tails 3.4 release, which included patches for the Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities publicly disclosed earlier this month, today's Tails 3.5 update is here to bump the Linux kernel to version 4.14.13 and include the microcode firmware for AMD CPUs to mitigate the Spectre flaw.

Read more

Graphics: Freedreno, Gallium3D, AMDGPU, RadeonSI, Mesa

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Code Aurora Working On Adreno 6xx Support For Freedreno

    The Qualcomm-aligned Code Aurora is working on supporting the latest-generation Adreno A6xx graphics hardware with the open-source Freedreno+MSM driver stack.

  • Work Revised On Adding SPIR-V Support To Clover Gallium3D

    Last May we reported on a Nouveau developer adding SPIR-V support to Gallium3D's OpenCL state tracker. Finally the better part of one year later, Pierre Moreau is ready with the second version of these patches to accept this IR associated with Vulkan / OpenCL 2.1+ within Clover.

  • Trying Out DRM-Next For Linux 4.16 With AMDGPU On Polaris & Vega

    I have spent some time this weekend trying out the DRM-Next code slated for inclusion in Linux 4.16 when its merge window opens next week. The DRM-Next state of the AMDGPU driver appears to be in good shape, at least for the RX 580 and RX Vega cards used for my initial testing.

  • RadeonSI NIR Back-End Picks Up Support For More OpenGL Extensions

    It was just a few days ago that Valve Linux developer Timothy Arceri enabled GLSL 4.50 support for RadeonSI's NIR back-end after previously taking care of tessellation shaders and other requirements. Now he has taken to implementing some other extensions in RadeonSI's NIR code-path.

  • mesa 18.0-0-rc1

    The first release candidate for Mesa 18.0.0 is now available.

    The plan is to have one release candidate every Friday, until the anticipated
    final release on 9th February 2018.

    The expectation is that the 17.3 branch will remain alive with bi-weekly
    releases until the 18.0.1 release.

    NOTE: Building the SWR with LLVM 3.9 is currently not possible. Please use
    newer LLVM version until the issue is resolved.

    Here are the people which helped shape the current release.

  • Mesa 18.0 Now Under Feature Freeze With 18.0-RC1 Premiere

    Feature development on Mesa 18.0 has now ended with the release today of 18.0-RC1 following the code-base being branched.

    Emil Velikov of Collabora just announced the availability of Mesa 18.0-RC1. As usual, he's planning on weekly release candidates until the 18.0.0 stable release is ready to ship. Velikov tentatively expects to ship Mesa 18.0.0 around 9 February, but as we know from past releases, it might end up slipping by some days.

Using Dual 4K Monitors Stacked With GNOME

Filed under
GNOME

The setup for my main production system that is still on Fedora Workstation 26 with GNOME Shell 3.24.3 has been working out fine. The two displays are the ASUS MG28UQ monitors that work out well on their own and do work with AMDGPU FreeSync on Linux. A GeForce GTX 1050 Ti is enough to power the dual 3840 x 2160 displays for desktop tasks mostly limited to many terminals, Firefox, Chrome, Thunderbird, and other GNOME desktop applications. Certainly that lower-end Pascal GPU isn't fast enough for 4K gaming, but it's not like I have the time for any gaming and for a purely desktop system it's working out fine paired with the 387.34 proprietary driver on Fedora 26 paired with Linux 4.14.

Read more

Games: Feral Interactive, Iconoclasts, Godot, SteamOS

Filed under
Gaming
  • Which Game Do You Most Want on Linux This Year? Feral Interactive Wants to Know…

    Feral Interactive is the company behind a stack of well-known Linux game ports and now they're asking which game you most want to see released on Linux.

  • Become a mechanic and save the world in Iconoclasts, now on Linux

    It's not often I enjoy a game as thoroughly as Iconoclasts, there's so much about it to love it's something I will remember for a long time.

    Disclosure: Key provided by the developer and GOG. Also, GOG links are affiliate links.

    Iconoclasts took a long time to make, the developer said it took seven years of full time development to make it happen, the end result is something quite remarkable. A game that would have fit rather nicely on the classic Sega Mega Drive, yet it feels fresh, fun and absolutely full of life.

  • Open source game engine 'Godot Engine' has a second 3.0 release candidate

    Godot Engine [Official Site] is nearly ready to level up with the big 3.0 release, they've put out a second release candidate for testing.

  • Dev snapshot: Godot 3.0 RC 2

    The final release of Godot 3.0 is getting closer and closer! We had a first Release Candidate (RC) last week, quite stable already but with some remaining blockers and late regressions.

    After a week of bugfixing with a tight control of what gets merged and what must wait for the 3.1 development cycle, we should now have a pretty good RC 2.

  • Valve Releases Big SteamOS Update with Linux Kernel 4.14, New Nvidia/AMD Drivers

    Valve released today a new stable update of its Debian-based SteamOS gaming operating system that brings a new kernel version, new Nvidia and AMD drivers, and lots of up-to-date components.

    SteamOS 2.148 is now the newest stable release of the Linux-based operating system that ships pre-installed on Steam Machines. While it remains based on the Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" operating system series, SteamOS 2.148 is powered by the latest Linux 4.14.13 kernel, which includes patches for Spectre and Meltdown flaws.

    Additionally, SteamOS 2.148 includes new Nvidia, AMD, and Intel graphics drivers. It uses the Nvidia 387.22 proprietary graphics driver for Nvidia GPUs, as well as the open-source Mesa 17.2.4 graphics stack for AMD Radeon and Intel GPUs. Other than that, the update comes with better upgrade support.

Mozilla Firefox 58

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Latest Firefox Quantum release available with faster, always-on privacy with opt-in Tracking Protection and new features

    We accept things in the online world that we wouldn’t accept in the physical one. For instance, how would you feel if you popped your head in a store and that store now had the ability to keep sending you flyers even if you didn’t buy anything? Online, we often visit sites that track us, but it isn’t clear when this is happening or how the information is being used. Adding insult to injury, this often invisible tracking actually slows down web pages.

  • Firefox 58 Arrives With Continued Speed Optimizations

    Mozilla has set free Firefox 58.0 today as their latest "Firefox Quantum" release that continues work on being a performant web browser.

  • Firefox Quantum 58 builds on performance gains, improves screenshots tool

    Mozilla is rolling out Firefox Quantum 58.0 for desktop, along with Firefox for Android 58.0. It arrives over two months after the landmark release of Firefox Quantum 57.0.

    The latest build focuses on performance and security, while an update to Firefox’s user profile feature means it’s no longer backwards compatible with previous versions. Android users also gain the ability to pin favorite websites to their home screen for use like native apps.

  • Firefox 58 Released for Linux, Mac, and Windows

    The Mozilla Foundation has made Firefox 58 files available for download on its official FTP servers. An official announcement will be made later today when the organization will also release the final changelog.

  • Browse without baggage in Firefox: Set Tracking Protection to always on

    We just can’t stop making Firefox faster — and with our most recent release, we also made it easier for you to control how much you’re tracked.

  • Firefox 58: The Quantum Era Continues

    2017 was a big year for Mozilla, culminating in the release of Firefox Quantum, a massive multi-year re-tooling of the browser focused on speed, and laying the groundwork for the years to come. In 2018, we’ll build on that incredible foundation, and in that spirit our next several releases will continue to bear the Quantum moniker. Let’s take a look at some of the new goodies that Firefox 58 brings.

LibreOffice 6.0 Will Launch with Many Design Improvements, Use Elementary Icons

Filed under
LibO

The major LibreOffice 6.0 release is coming next week, and The Document Foundation's Mike Saunders talked with members of the community to get their perspectives on LibreOffice's new design.

While it won't bring a massive redesign, as most users may have expected, LibreOffice 6.0 will include a few noteworthy design changes, including new table styles, new gradients, updated motif/splash screen, improved Notebookbars, menu and toolbar improvements, and the Elementary icons.

Read more

Linux Foundation introduces the LF Networking Fund, harmonizes​ open source, open standards

Filed under
Linux
OSS

The Linux Foundation is taking the first step to bring some commonality across its myriad network efforts by creating the LF Networking Fund (LFN).

By creating a combined administrative structure, Linux Foundation said LFN will provide a platform for cross-project collaboration.

LFN will form the foundation for collaboration across the network stack: the data plane into the control plane, to orchestration, automation and testing.

Read more

Openwashing Surveillance

Filed under
OSS
Sci/Tech
  • Facebook Open Sources Detectron Object Detection

    The way big companies are open sourcing significant AI is both gratifying and slightly worrying. AI is the biggest revolution since we discovered fire and started making tools. FaceBook AI Research has added to the list of what is available by open sourcing its Detectron project.

  • Facebook open-sources object detection research

    Facebook's artificial intelligence research (FAIR) team today announced it would open-source its object detection platform Detectron, as well as the research the team has done on it.

  • Facebook open-sources object detection work: Watch out, Google CAPTCHA

    acebook has brought us one step closer to a Skynet future made a commitment to computer vision boffinry by open-sourcing its codebase for object detection, Detectron.

    Written in Python and powered by the Caffe2 deep learning framework, the codebase – which implements object-sniffing algos such as Mask R-CNN and RetinaNet – is available under the Apache 2.0 licence.

Exploring Linux containers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Red Hat
Server

They're not quite virtual systems, since they rely on the host OS to operate, nor are they simply applications. Dan Walsh from Red Hat has said that on Linux, "everything is a container," reminding me of the days when people claimed that everything on Unix was a file. But the vision has less to do with the guts of the OS and more to do with explaining how containers work and how they are different than virtual systems in some very interesting and important ways.

Read more

Media Covers WINE Running on Android

Filed under
Android
  • Wine 3.0 released, lets you run Windows apps on Android smartphones

    Wine 3.0, which is a compatibility layer for Linux-based systems has been released. The version brings the ability to run Windows apps on your Android device. Until now, Wine allows users to run Windows apps on Linux and other Unix-like OS.

  • Running Windows apps on Android is slowly getting there

    Our smartphones are getting so powerful that they’re being used for sometimes crazy things, like bitcoin mining or running as a desktop. How about running a desktop? Been there, done that, at least as far as Linux is concerned. But running Windows programs on Android, without tricks like remote desktops or virtual machines, is a different thing entirely. It could, however, be close to becoming reality thanks to the latest WINE 3.0 release, which paves the way for running Windows win32 programs on Android almost natively.

  • Linux Windows emulator Wine now available on Android

    Wine, the Windows emulator that (typically) runs on Linux is coming to Android.

    The open-source compatibility layer has been a mainstay of Linux since 1993, enabling users to deploy applications built for Microsoft's ubiquitous operating system without having to install the OS itself - notwithstanding

    The newly-released Wine 3.0 includes graphics drivers that extend this functionality to Android.

Top Linux And Open Source Stories Of Year 2017

Filed under
Linux

​The year 2017 has been an eventful year for open source community with highs and lows throughout the year. Open source and Linux continue to dominate with their presence from the mobile phones to supercomputers. Let's quickly go through some of the major events in the year 2017.

Read<br />
more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • X.Org Server 1.20 Gets Another XWayland Improvement: Prevents Overflowing

    There is yet another change for X.Org Server 1.20 that has now been in development for more than one year.

    The XWayland code within the xorg-server will now better safeguard against potentially overflowing the Wayland connection that could trigger the connection being aborted within the Wayland client library.

  • Etnaviv Working On Initial Bring-Up Of GC7000L/i.MX8M Graphics

    Prominent Etnaviv driver developer Lucas Stach for working on open-source, reverse-engineered Vivante graphics support has posted initial patches for the GC7000L support as found on the i.MX8M SoC.

    This bring-up is important especially with Purism hoping to use the i.MX8M for their Librem 5 smartphone and as part of that using the open-source Etnaviv graphics driver.

  • Tableau goes 'Hyper' on data ingestion & query

    Tableau 10.5 also introduces Tableau Server on Linux so that users can combine Tableau’s analytics platform with Linux’s enterprise capabilities.

    With identical end user functionality to Tableau on Windows, customers already using Linux in their IT environments can integrate Tableau Server into their processes and workflows.

GNOME: Belated GUADEC Report, "Is GNOME Just Lazy?"

Filed under
GNOME
  • Alberto Ruiz: GUADEC 2017: GNOME’s Renaissance

    This is a blog post I kept as a draft right after GUADEC to reflect on it and the GNOME project but failed to finish and publish until now. Forgive any outdated information though I think the post is mostly relevant still.

    I’m on my train back to London from Manchester, where I just spent 7 amazing days with my fellow GNOME community members. Props to the local team for an amazing organization, everything went smoothly and people seemed extremely pleased with the setup as far as I can tell and the venues seemed to have worked extremely well. I mostly want to reflect on a feeling that I have which is that GNOME seems to be experiencing a renaissance in the energy and focus of the community as well as the broader interest from other players.

  • EzeeLinux Show 18.5 | Is GNOME Just Lazy?

    GNOME is dropping Active Desktop, Ubuntu is holding back Nautilus and I have been writing a lot of scripts.

Red Hat Hires From Microsoft; Fedora 27 Release Party at Taipei

Filed under
Red Hat

Devices: Advantech, Tizen, F-Droid

Filed under
Android
Linux
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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Initial Retpoline Support Added To LLVM For Spectre v2 Mitigation
    The LLVM code has been merged to mainline for the Retpoline x86 mitigation technique for Spectre Variant 2. This will be back-ported to LLVM 6.0 and also LLVM 5.0 with an immediate point release expected to get this patched compiler out in the wild. The compiler-side work -- similar to GCC's Retpoline code -- is to avoid generating code where an indirect branch could have its prediction poisoned by a rogue actor. The Retpoline support uses indirect calls in a non-speculatable way.
  • Teen Hacker Who Social Engineered His Way Into Top-Level US Government Officials' Accounts Pleads Guilty To Ten Charges
    The teenage hacker who tore CIA director John Brennan a new AOL-hole is awaiting sentencing in the UK. Kane Gamble, the apparent founder of hacker collective Crackas With Attitude, was able to access classified documents Brennan has forwarded to his personal email account by posing as a Verizon tech. Social engineering is still the best hacking tool. It's something anyone anywhere can do. If you do it well, a whole host of supposedly-secured information can be had, thanks to multiple entities relying on the same personal identifiers to "verify" the social engineer they're talking to is the person who owns accounts they're granting access to. Despite claiming he was motivated by American injustices perpetrated around the world (Palestine is namechecked in the teen's multiple mini-manifestos), a lot of what Gamble participated in was plain, old fashioned harassment.
  • The Guardian view on cyberwar: an urgent problem [Ed: Lists several attacks by Microsoft Windows (but names neither)]
    The first known, and perhaps the most successful of these, was the joint US/Israeli Stuxnet attack on the Iranian nuclear programme in 2009. Since then there has been increasing evidence of attacks of this sort by Russia – against Estonia in 2009, and then against Ukraine, where tens of thousands of attacks on everything from power supplies to voting machines have opened an under-reported front in an under-reported war. Across the Baltic, the Swedish government has just announced a beefed-up programme of civil defence, of which the most substantial part will be an attempt to protect its software and networks from attacks. Meanwhile, North Korean state hackers are blamed by western intelligence services for the WannaCry ransomware attacks which last year shut down several NHS hospitals in the UK. Persistent reports suggest the US has interfered in this way with North Korea’s nuclear missile programme.
  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #143
  • Don’t Install Meltdown And Spectre Patches, Intel Warns It Would Increase System Reebots
  • On that Spectre mitigations discussion
    By now, almost everybody has probably seen the press coverage of Linus Torvalds's remarks about one of the patches addressing Spectre variant 2. Less noted, but much more informative, is David Woodhouse's response on why those patches are the way they are.

Tails 3.5 Anonymous OS Released to Mitigate Spectre Vulnerability for AMD CPUs

Tails, the open-source Linux-based operating system designed to protect user's privacy while surfing the Internet, also known as Anonymous OS, was updated today to version 3.5. Coming only two weeks after the Tails 3.4 release, which included patches for the Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities publicly disclosed earlier this month, today's Tails 3.5 update is here to bump the Linux kernel to version 4.14.13 and include the microcode firmware for AMD CPUs to mitigate the Spectre flaw. Read more

Graphics: Freedreno, Gallium3D, AMDGPU, RadeonSI, Mesa

  • Code Aurora Working On Adreno 6xx Support For Freedreno
    The Qualcomm-aligned Code Aurora is working on supporting the latest-generation Adreno A6xx graphics hardware with the open-source Freedreno+MSM driver stack.
  • Work Revised On Adding SPIR-V Support To Clover Gallium3D
    Last May we reported on a Nouveau developer adding SPIR-V support to Gallium3D's OpenCL state tracker. Finally the better part of one year later, Pierre Moreau is ready with the second version of these patches to accept this IR associated with Vulkan / OpenCL 2.1+ within Clover.
  • Trying Out DRM-Next For Linux 4.16 With AMDGPU On Polaris & Vega
    I have spent some time this weekend trying out the DRM-Next code slated for inclusion in Linux 4.16 when its merge window opens next week. The DRM-Next state of the AMDGPU driver appears to be in good shape, at least for the RX 580 and RX Vega cards used for my initial testing.
  • RadeonSI NIR Back-End Picks Up Support For More OpenGL Extensions
    It was just a few days ago that Valve Linux developer Timothy Arceri enabled GLSL 4.50 support for RadeonSI's NIR back-end after previously taking care of tessellation shaders and other requirements. Now he has taken to implementing some other extensions in RadeonSI's NIR code-path.
  • mesa 18.0-0-rc1
    The first release candidate for Mesa 18.0.0 is now available. The plan is to have one release candidate every Friday, until the anticipated final release on 9th February 2018. The expectation is that the 17.3 branch will remain alive with bi-weekly releases until the 18.0.1 release. NOTE: Building the SWR with LLVM 3.9 is currently not possible. Please use newer LLVM version until the issue is resolved. Here are the people which helped shape the current release.
  • Mesa 18.0 Now Under Feature Freeze With 18.0-RC1 Premiere
    Feature development on Mesa 18.0 has now ended with the release today of 18.0-RC1 following the code-base being branched. Emil Velikov of Collabora just announced the availability of Mesa 18.0-RC1. As usual, he's planning on weekly release candidates until the 18.0.0 stable release is ready to ship. Velikov tentatively expects to ship Mesa 18.0.0 around 9 February, but as we know from past releases, it might end up slipping by some days.

Using Dual 4K Monitors Stacked With GNOME

The setup for my main production system that is still on Fedora Workstation 26 with GNOME Shell 3.24.3 has been working out fine. The two displays are the ASUS MG28UQ monitors that work out well on their own and do work with AMDGPU FreeSync on Linux. A GeForce GTX 1050 Ti is enough to power the dual 3840 x 2160 displays for desktop tasks mostly limited to many terminals, Firefox, Chrome, Thunderbird, and other GNOME desktop applications. Certainly that lower-end Pascal GPU isn't fast enough for 4K gaming, but it's not like I have the time for any gaming and for a purely desktop system it's working out fine paired with the 387.34 proprietary driver on Fedora 26 paired with Linux 4.14. Read more