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Sunday, 19 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Linux Mint 18.2 to Come with a Revamped Bluetooth Panel, Updated Xplayer and Xed

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Linux

Clement Lefebvre, the founder and lead developer of the popular Linux Mint operating system, published the project's monthly newsletter for the month of February 2017 to keep the community up-to-date with the latest developments.

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Debian-Based GParted Live 0.28.1-1 Released with Linux 4.9.6 and GParted 0.28.1

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OS
Debian

A day after announcing the release of GParted 0.28.1, which re-enabled the ability for users to resize or move primary disk partitions, Curtis Gedak is today releasing the GParted Live 0.28.1-1 distro.

Read more

Also: GParted 0.28.1 Restores Ability to Resize or Move Primary Partitions, Fixes Bugs

Linux 4.10

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Linux
  • Linux 4.10
  • Linux Kernel 4.10 Officially Released with Virtual GPU Support, Many Features

    As expected, Linus Torvalds announced today the general availability of the Linux 4.10 kernel series, which add a great number of improvements, new security features, and support for the newest hardware components.

    Linux kernel 4.10 has been in development for the past seven weeks, during which it received a total of eight RC (Release Candidate) snapshots that implemented all the changes that you'll soon be able to enjoy on your favorite Linux-based operating system.

  • Linux 4.10 Kernel Released

    Linus Torvalds has released the Linux 4.10 kernel.

    As of writing this article, Torvalds hasn't put out anything on the mailing list but Linux 4.10 is out.

Desktop GNU/Linux/Chromebook

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • A Minimal Chrome OS Theme for Tint2

    I used to (and sort-of-still-do, I guess) run a sister site focused on Google Chrome, Chromecast and Chromebooks, i.e. the Chrome ecosystem.

    As such I am a fan of Chromebooks and Chrome OS, a Linux-based distribution based on Gentoo. The appearance of Chrome OS has waxed and waned in sync with Google’s ambitions and positioning for the OS, going form hyper-minimal to a full desktop clone (with the desktop-y Chrome Apps platform) through to a Material Design inspired Android + Chrome hybrid today.

  • Off-The-Shelf Hacker: Linux for Cheap Hardware, Then and Now

    Most people, don’t realize how prolific Linux has become. With the Embedded Linux Conference just a week away, I’ve been reflecting on how Linux has provided a sort of computing “circle of life” experience for me. It’s powered my computational hardware 20 years ago and continues to do so today.

  • [Video] XPS 13 Review | Linux Action Show 457
  • GParted 0.28.1

    This release of GParted restores the ability to move/resize primary partitions when an extended partition exists. The move/resize regression was introduced in version 0.28.0. This release also includes some minor bug fixes.

  • Antergos Linux : The beauty built on Arch

    Hi guys, welcome to the 16th segment of "Introduction with Linux Distro". Most of us know or heard about Arch Linux, which is one of the most widely used Linux distribution. For some reason, few users find it hard to install and use Arch. But in Linux world, there is almost always some alternative to your desired distribution. In today's segment, we will be introducing an Arch-based distribution which turned it completely on user-friendly side. So, let's get to know about Antergos Linux.

Kernel Space/Linux

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Linux

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • Picard 1.4 released

    The last time we put out a stable release was more than 2 years ago, so a lot of changes have made it into this new release. If you’re in a hurry and just want to try it out, the downloads are available from the Picard website.

  • Linux Digital Audio Workstations: Open Source Music Production

    Linux Digital Audio Workstations
    When most people think of music programs, they’ll usually think Mac OS or Windows. However, there are also a few Linux digital audio workstations. The support and features of these programs can vary, but they’re a good choice to setup a cheap recording studio. Some of them are even good competitors for paid programs, offering features such as multitrack recording, MIDI, and virtual instruments.

    Keep in mind that many audio editing programs for Linux rely on the Jack backend. You’ll need a dedicated system to install these programs on, since it doesn’t work properly in a virtual machine.

    In the following article, we’ll cover audio editing programs that are available for Linux. We’ll talk about the available features, as well as help you decide which program to use for your needs.

  • i2pd 2.12 released

    i2pd (I2P Daemon) is a full-featured C++ implementation of I2P client.

    I2P (Invisible Internet Protocol) is a universal anonymous network layer. All communications over I2P are anonymous and end-to-end encrypted, participants don't reveal their real IP addresses.

  • 4 Command-Line Graphics Tools for Linux

    For the most part, they’re wrong. Command-line image tools do much of what their GUI counterparts can, and they can do it just as well. Sometimes, especially when dealing with multiple image files or working on an older computer, command-line tools can do a better job.

    Let’s take a look at four command-line tools that can ably handle many of your basic (and not-so-basic) image manipulation tasks.

  • CloudStats - Best Server Monitoring Tool for Linux Servers

    CloudStats is an effective tool for Linux server monitoring and network monitoring. With CloudStats you get whole visibility into key performance criteria of your Linux Server. You can proactively track different server metrics like CPU, disk and memory usage, services, apps, processes and more. The best thing is that you don’t need to have any special technical skills – this tool for server monitoring is very easy to install and run from any device.

  • New Inkscape 0.92.1 fixes your previous works done with Inkscape

    This blog-post is about a happy-end after a previously published blog-post named New Inkscape 0.92 breaks your previous works done with Inkscape published on 20 January. A lot of reactions did happen about this previous blog-post and the news get quickly viral. That's why I thought it was nice to make another blog post to "close this case".

  • Qt 5.10 To Have Built-In Vulkan Support

    With Qt 5.8 there was experimental Direct3D 12 support that left some disappointed the toolkit didn't opt for supporting Vulkan first as a cross-platform, high-performance graphics API. Fortunately, with Qt 5.10, there will be built-in Vulkan support.

    Going back nearly one year there has been Vulkan work around Qt while with Qt 5.10 it's becoming a reality. However, with Qt 5.9 not even being released until the end of May, Qt 5.10 isn't going to officially debut until either the very end of 2017 or early 2018.

  • Rusty Builder

    Thanks to Georg Vienna, Builder can now manage your Rust installations using RustUp!

  • GNOME MPlayer knows how to grow your playlist size

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • Unvanquished Open-Source Shooter Game Prepares For An Exciting 2017

    The Unvanquished open-source first person shooter game had been very promising and issuing monthly alpha releases all the way up to 48 alpha versions while they ended that one year ago without any new releases. The project is still ongoing and they are preparing for a great 2017.

    The Unvanquished team posted a teaser to their project site this weekend. They have been working on some "much bigger" changes. They aren't saying what the next release will be, but most will know what generally follows alpha builds... I'm a big supporter of Unvanquished, and have heard from their project lead and look forward to what's next Wink

  • OSS: RPG Maker MV CoreScript

    "RPG Maker MV CoreScript" is a game engine player for 2D games that runs on the browser. "RPG Maker MV CoreScript" is designed as a game engine dedicated to "RPG Maker MV", the latest work of "RPG Maker" series of 2DRPG world number one software with more than 20 years history, and more than 1000 games are running. (February 2017)

  • HITMAN released for Linux, initial port report and two gameplay videos

    HITMAN [Steam, Feral Store] is the brand new Linux port from Feral Interactive and what a game it is! This is some serious fun to keep you occupied for many hours!

  • Hitman is Coming to Your Home
  • Castle Game Engine 6.0 Released

    Castle Game Engine is yet another open-source cross-platform game engine. What separates this game engine from others is that interestingly it's written in Object Pascal.

    Up until seeing this Castle Game Engine 6.0 release, I hadn't thought of Object Pascal in a few years and interesting it's being used by this game engine. Castle Engine 6.0 continues to be fitted for both 2D and 3D games and this latest release incorporates about one year of development work.

Fedora: The Latest

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Anaconda Install Banners get a Makeover!

    A redesign/ update for Anaconda install banners has been an ongoing project for me since the summer and has recently, in the passed month or so, had a fair amount of conversation on its Pagure ticket. I have done multiple series of iterations for these banners, and in the couple of weeks have established a design that represents the Fedora vibe. There are three, sort of, sub-categories for the banners: Common Banners, Server-specific Banners, and Desktop-specific Banners. At this point I have completed drafts of the Common banners (available on all editions) and the Desktop-specific banners (available in addition to Common for Desktop editions).

  • This is why I drink: a discussion of Fedora's legal state

    Tom Callaway seems to be a very nice person who has been overclocked to about 140% normal human speed. In only 20 minutes he gave an interesting and highly-amusing talk that could have filled a 45-minute slot on the legal principles that underpin Fedora, how they got that way, and how they work out in practice.

    In the old days, Callaway said, Red Hat made Red Hat Linux, entirely in-house. What the company didn't make was any money; sales of hats generated more profit than sales of Red Hat box sets, which apparently were sold at a loss. It was felt that this plan wouldn't work out in the long term, so Red Hat changed to making Enterprise Linux. It didn't want to stop doing a hobbyist Linux, however, so Fedora Core was launched. Red Hat also wanted the community to have input into what Fedora was, and how it looked, but the company couldn't just drop the reins and let the community take over, because it was still legally the distributor.

  • Modularity & Generational Core: The future of Fedora?
  • Fedora 25: running Geekbench.

Leftovers: Debian, Ubuntu and Derivatives

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Debian
Ubuntu

Linux Devices

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Linux
  • SPI On Embedded Linux

    Are you already comfortable working with Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) parts and looking for a challenge? We suspect many of you have cut your teeth on 8-bit through 32-bit microcontrollers but how much time have you spent playing with hardware interfaces on embedded Linux? Here a new quest, should you choose to accept it. [Matt Porter] spoke in detail about the Linux SPI Subsystem during his presentation at FOSDEM 2017. Why not grab an embedded Linux board and try your hand at connecting some extra hardware to one of the SPI buses?

  • PiMiniMint

    The idea of having a computer in an altoids tin came to me back when in early 2012, shortly after the original raspberry pi came out. With the release of the pi zero, this became a possibility. The first version of the PiMiniMint contains a screen, wifi, Bluetooth, 32gb of storage, an infrared camera, and a full size USB port. When I decided to add a battery, I realized the camera needed to be removed. The current vision of the PiMiniMint contains a battery life of around 6-8hrs, a 2in screen, 32gb of storage, Bluetooth, wifi, and a full sized USB port (in the form of an OTG cable).

  • Nextcloud ready Raspberry Pi image

    I would like to introduce NextCloudPi, a ready to use Raspbian 8 image with the latest Nextcloud 11.0.1.

  • We've started to order things!

    Once we have the kernel and OS running well enough for "almost" normal usage, I'll start sending the prototypes to the prototype orders as well as auction some more here at the boards.

  • Project Idea: PI Sw1tch

    While gaming is not high on my agenda anymore (... or rather at all), I have recently been mulling buying a new console, to act as much as a home entertainment center as a gaming system.

    Having owned several generations PlayStation and Sega products, a few new consoles caught my eye. While the most "open" solution, the Steambox sort-of fizzled out, Nintendo's latest console Switch does seem to stand out of the crowd. The balance between power and portability looks like a good fit, and given Nintendo's previous successes, it wouldn't be surprising if it became a hit.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • Fermat announces alpha release of blockchain-enabled open source project

    Fermat has made upgrades to the technology and architecture behind the decentralized and blockchain-enabled open source project Internet of People (IoP). Its goal is providing device-to-device communication independent of any entity of web server.

    Since its April 2016 launch, Fermat has added more than 60 national and regional chapters, each mining IoP tokens in a decentralized manner. Each chapter president is charged with advocating for the project in their community, running testnet nodes, organizing meet-ups, marketing, and token mining. Every chapter can run a single mining node and earn IoP tokens from the IoP blockchain as their reward.

  • Be Ready To Attend SCALE x15 Conference in March 2-5, USA

    We just witnessed the end of FOSDEM 2017; The largest FOSS event in Europe. It held around 660 different events about a lot of different topics and aspects of open source software. You can check their summary here.

  • #LinuxPlaya Preparation

    As #LinuxPlaya draws near, we’ve been preparing things to the event. We first did a workshop to help others to finish the GTK+Python tutorial for developers. While some other students from different universities in Lima did some posts to prove that they use Linux (FEDORA+GNOME). You can see in the following list, the various areas where they had worked: design, robotics, education, by using tech as Docker and a Snake GTK game.

  • LibreOffice 5.3 triggers a record of donations

    In this case, one image is better than 1,000 words, as the histogram represents donations during the first 10 days of each month, since May 2013, and doesn’t need any further comment. LibreOffice 5.3 has triggered 3,937 donations in February 2017, 1,800 more than in March 2016, and over 2,000 – sometimes over 3,000 – more than any other month. Donations are key to the life and the development of the project. Thanks, everyone.

  • That Was The Week That Was (TWTWTW): Edition 1

    This is the first edition of TWTWTW, a weekly blog promoting interesting developments in the open source world. TWTWTW seeks to whet your curiosity. The name pays homage to the satirical British TV comedy programme aired in the early 1960s. Except satire isn’t the the raison d’etre for this blog. Instead, it provides a concise distilled commentary of notable open source related news from a different perspective. For the first edition, we present a brief catchup covering software, hardware, and a useful web service.

  • Wikipedia, open source and the truth

    In a world where fact is increasingly treated like fiction, and fiction is presented as fact, few online resources
    have managed to preserve and retain their credibility the way Wikipedia has.

    The online, open-source encyclopedia has become an indispensable reference tool for those in search of information, including journalists.

GNU/FSF

Filed under
GNU
Legal
  • Why I Love Free Software

    I’m a Linux desktop user, because Linux doesn’t try to lock me into their platform and services only to abandon me halfway through the journey.

    Instead of having my access to remote management features, convenient encryption features, and even how long I’m allowed to use my own device be restricted by how much I’ve paid for my operating system edition; I’m free to choose whichever edition I want based on my needs of the moment.

  • Here's a sneak peek at LibrePlanet 2017: Register today!
  • What's a cryptovalentine?

    Roses are red, violets are blue; I use free software to encrypt my online communication and you can too.

  • Bradley Kuhn Delivered Copyleft Keynote at FOSDEM

    At FOSDEM last week, Conservancy’s Distinguished Technologist Bradley Kuhn delivered a keynote “Understanding The Complexity of Copyleft Defense.” The speech reviews the history of GPL enforcement efforts, pointing out development projects such as OpenWRT and SamyGo that began thanks to GPL compliance work. Kuhn focused in particular on how copyleft compliance can further empower users and developers as more kinds of devices run GPL’d software, and he concluded his remarks urging developers to take control of their own work by demanding to hold their own copyrights, using mechanisms such as Conservancy’s ContractPatch initiative.

Development News

Filed under
Development
  • DWARF Version 5 Standard Released

    The DWARF Debugging Information Format Standards Committee is pleased to announce the availability of Version 5 of the DWARF Debugging Format Standard. The DWARF Debugging Format is used to communicate debugging information between a compiler and debugger to make it easier for programmers to develop, test, and debug programs.

    DWARF is used by a wide range of compilers and debuggers, both proprietary and open source, to support debugging of Ada, C, C++, Cobol, FORTRAN, Java, and other programming languages. DWARF V5 adds support for new languages like Rust, Swift, Ocaml, Go, and Haskell, as well as support for new features in older languages. DWARF can be used with a wide range of processor architectures, such as x86, ARM, PowerPC, from 8-bit to 64-bit.

  • Things that won't change in Python

    A lengthy and strongly opinionated post about Python features to the python-ideas mailing list garnered various responses there, from some agreement to strong disagreement to calling it "trolling", but it may also lead the Python community to better define what Python is. Trolling seems a somewhat unfair characterization, but Simon Lovell's "Python Reviewed" post did call out some of the fundamental attributes of the language and made some value judgments that were seen as either coming from ignorance of the language or simply as opinions that were stated as facts in a brusque way. The thread eventually led to the creation of a document meant to help head off this kind of thread in the future.

  • modulemd 1.1.0

    This is a little belated announcement but let it be known that I released a new version of the module metadata library, modulemd-1.1.0, earlier this week!

  • RPushbullet 0.3.1
  • A rift in the NTP world

    The failure of the Network Time Protocol (NTP) project could be catastrophic. However, what few have noticed is that the attempts to prevent that catastrophe may have created entirely new challenges.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Mobile apps and stealing a connected car

    The concept of a connected car, or a car equipped with Internet access, has been gaining popularity for the last several years. The case in point is not only multimedia systems (music, maps, and films are available on-board in modern luxury cars) but also car key systems in both literal and figurative senses. By using proprietary mobile apps, it is possible to get the GPS coordinates of a car, trace its route, open its doors, start its engine, and turn on its auxiliary devices. On the one hand, these are absolutely useful features used by millions of people, but on the other hand, if a car thief were to gain access to the mobile device that belongs to a victim that has the app installed, then would car theft not become a mere trifle?

  • [Video] Keynote: Security and Privacy in a Hyper-connected World - Bruce Schneier, Security Expert
  • RSA Conference: Lessons from a Billion Breached Data Records

    Troy Hunt sees more breached records than most of us, running the popular ethical data breach search service "Have I been pwned." In a session at the RSA Conference this week, Hunt entertained the capacity crowd with tales both humorous and frightening about breaches that he has been involved with.

    One of things that Hunt said he is often asked is exactly how he learns about so many breaches. His answer was simple.

    "Normally stuff just gets sent to me," Hunt said.

    He emphasized that he doesn't want to be a disclosure channel for breaches, as that's not a role he wants to play. Rather his goal is more about helping people to be informed and protect themselves.

  • How Google Secures Gmail Against Spam and Ransomware

    Google's Gmail web email service is used by millions of companies and consumers around the world, making it an attractive target for attackers. In a session at the RSA Conference here, Elie Bursztein, anti-fraud and abuse research team lead at Google, detailed the many technologies and processes that Google uses to protect users and the Gmail service itself from exploitation.

  • IBM Reveals Security Risks to Owners of Previously Owned IoT Devices

    hen you sell a car, typically the new owner gets the keys to the car and the original owner walks away. With a connected car, Charles Henderson, global head of X-Force Red at IBM Security, found that the original owner still has remote access capabilities, even years after the car has been sold.

    Henderson revealed his disturbing new research into a previously unexplored area of internet of things (IoT) security at the RSA Conference here on Feb. 17. In a video interview with eWEEK, Henderson detailed the management issue he found with IoT devices and why it's a real risk.

    "As smart as a connected car is, it's not smart enough to know that it has been sold, and that poses a real problem," Henderson said.

Linux 4.9.11

Filed under
Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 4.9.11 kernel.

All users of the 4.9 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.9.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.9.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

Read more

Also: Linux 4.4.50

Top 5 Linux distros of 2017

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Linux

Ever since it was introduced, Linux has been gaining rapid popularity among users. Linux is used for networking, software development and web hosting. However, choosing the right distro is very important given that there are dozens of them which can fulfil your needs.

A distro, or distribution, is tech-talk for a Linux operating system (OS). Each distro is differentiated by its default interface, i.e. the way it looks, the library of apps officially supported by the specific “brand” of Linux, catalog of stock applications and even repositories. In the Linux world, there are hundreds of different flavors of distro. Examples include Debian, Ubuntu and Red Hat (among many others).

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Review on Solus 2017.01.01: Solid, Stable and Fast

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Reviews

Solus is an independent Linux distribution which targets desktop PC users. The project started in 2011 carrying the name “SolusOS” but later was changed to a plain “Solus”. What mainly makes Solus different is its desktop interface called “Budgie” beside a lot of other software like “eopkg” which is the distribution’s package manager.

Solus uses a rolling release model. Providing an updated ISO file of the distribution every few months containing the latest software and updates. This, however, doesn’t mean that the system is “unstable” like some other rolling Linux distributions.

There are a lot of exciting things when it comes to Solus. Its desktop interface “Budgie” is completely developed from scratch but is compatible with some GNOME technologies. It also has its own package manager called “eopkg” which uses .eopkg format for package files (it doesn’t depend on .deb or .rpm files nor can install them). “eopkg” was forked from Pardus Linux. But developers of Solus have plans to replace it with “sol“.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Desktop GNU/Linux/Chromebook

  • A Minimal Chrome OS Theme for Tint2
    I used to (and sort-of-still-do, I guess) run a sister site focused on Google Chrome, Chromecast and Chromebooks, i.e. the Chrome ecosystem. As such I am a fan of Chromebooks and Chrome OS, a Linux-based distribution based on Gentoo. The appearance of Chrome OS has waxed and waned in sync with Google’s ambitions and positioning for the OS, going form hyper-minimal to a full desktop clone (with the desktop-y Chrome Apps platform) through to a Material Design inspired Android + Chrome hybrid today.
  • Off-The-Shelf Hacker: Linux for Cheap Hardware, Then and Now
    Most people, don’t realize how prolific Linux has become. With the Embedded Linux Conference just a week away, I’ve been reflecting on how Linux has provided a sort of computing “circle of life” experience for me. It’s powered my computational hardware 20 years ago and continues to do so today.
  • [Video] XPS 13 Review | Linux Action Show 457
  • GParted 0.28.1
    This release of GParted restores the ability to move/resize primary partitions when an extended partition exists. The move/resize regression was introduced in version 0.28.0. This release also includes some minor bug fixes.
  • Antergos Linux : The beauty built on Arch
    Hi guys, welcome to the 16th segment of "Introduction with Linux Distro". Most of us know or heard about Arch Linux, which is one of the most widely used Linux distribution. For some reason, few users find it hard to install and use Arch. But in Linux world, there is almost always some alternative to your desired distribution. In today's segment, we will be introducing an Arch-based distribution which turned it completely on user-friendly side. So, let's get to know about Antergos Linux.

Kernel Space/Linux

Leftovers: Software

  • Picard 1.4 released
    The last time we put out a stable release was more than 2 years ago, so a lot of changes have made it into this new release. If you’re in a hurry and just want to try it out, the downloads are available from the Picard website.
  • Linux Digital Audio Workstations: Open Source Music Production
    Linux Digital Audio Workstations When most people think of music programs, they’ll usually think Mac OS or Windows. However, there are also a few Linux digital audio workstations. The support and features of these programs can vary, but they’re a good choice to setup a cheap recording studio. Some of them are even good competitors for paid programs, offering features such as multitrack recording, MIDI, and virtual instruments. Keep in mind that many audio editing programs for Linux rely on the Jack backend. You’ll need a dedicated system to install these programs on, since it doesn’t work properly in a virtual machine. In the following article, we’ll cover audio editing programs that are available for Linux. We’ll talk about the available features, as well as help you decide which program to use for your needs.
  • i2pd 2.12 released
    i2pd (I2P Daemon) is a full-featured C++ implementation of I2P client. I2P (Invisible Internet Protocol) is a universal anonymous network layer. All communications over I2P are anonymous and end-to-end encrypted, participants don't reveal their real IP addresses.
  • 4 Command-Line Graphics Tools for Linux
    For the most part, they’re wrong. Command-line image tools do much of what their GUI counterparts can, and they can do it just as well. Sometimes, especially when dealing with multiple image files or working on an older computer, command-line tools can do a better job. Let’s take a look at four command-line tools that can ably handle many of your basic (and not-so-basic) image manipulation tasks.
  • CloudStats - Best Server Monitoring Tool for Linux Servers
    CloudStats is an effective tool for Linux server monitoring and network monitoring. With CloudStats you get whole visibility into key performance criteria of your Linux Server. You can proactively track different server metrics like CPU, disk and memory usage, services, apps, processes and more. The best thing is that you don’t need to have any special technical skills – this tool for server monitoring is very easy to install and run from any device.
  • New Inkscape 0.92.1 fixes your previous works done with Inkscape
    This blog-post is about a happy-end after a previously published blog-post named New Inkscape 0.92 breaks your previous works done with Inkscape published on 20 January. A lot of reactions did happen about this previous blog-post and the news get quickly viral. That's why I thought it was nice to make another blog post to "close this case".
  • Qt 5.10 To Have Built-In Vulkan Support
    With Qt 5.8 there was experimental Direct3D 12 support that left some disappointed the toolkit didn't opt for supporting Vulkan first as a cross-platform, high-performance graphics API. Fortunately, with Qt 5.10, there will be built-in Vulkan support. Going back nearly one year there has been Vulkan work around Qt while with Qt 5.10 it's becoming a reality. However, with Qt 5.9 not even being released until the end of May, Qt 5.10 isn't going to officially debut until either the very end of 2017 or early 2018.
  • Rusty Builder
    Thanks to Georg Vienna, Builder can now manage your Rust installations using RustUp!
  • GNOME MPlayer knows how to grow your playlist size

today's howtos