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Monday, 25 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Terminator A Linux Terminal Emulator With Multiple Terminals In One Window

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Each Linux distribution has a default terminal emulator for interacting with system through commands. But the default terminal app might not be perfect for you. There are so many terminal apps that will provide you more functionalities to perform more tasks simultaneously to sky-rocket speed of your work. Such useful terminal emulators include Terminator, a multi-windows supported free terminal emulator for your Linux system.

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more

Fluxday: A no-fuss open source productivity tracker

Filed under
OSS

It would have been easier if we already had an open source platform we could build on. Although we did manage to build it quickly without disrupting our main projects, other companies might find it easier to adopt an existing platform rather than allocate extra time towards building an in-house productivity management application. For that reason, we've made Fluxday an open source project.

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Solus Project to No Longer Offer a Release Schedule, Solus 1.2.1 Gets Delayed

Filed under
OS

Solus Project founder and architect Ikey Doherty announced on July 24, 2016, that the static release schedule for their Solus operating system is officially and completely dropped.

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Feral Interactive Ports Life Is Strange to Linux and Mac, Episode 1 Is Now Free

Filed under
Gaming

Feral Interactive has recently announced that they have managed to successfully port the popular, award-winning Life Is Strange game to GNU/Linux and Mac OS X operating systems.

Read more

Introduction to Modularity

Filed under
Red Hat

Modularity is an exciting, new initiative aimed at resolving the issue of diverging (and occasionally conflicting) lifecycles of different “components” within Fedora. A great example of a diverging and conflicting lifecycle is the Ruby on Rails (RoR) lifecycle, whereby Fedora stipulates that itself can only have one version of RoR at any point in time – but that doesn’t mean Fedora’s version of RoR won’t conflict with another version of RoR used in an application. Therefore, we want to avoid having “components”, like RoR, conflict with other existing components within Fedora.

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Our First Look at Linux Mint 18 Cinnamon

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Now that I’ve had about a week to play around in Mint 18, I find a lot to like and have no major complaints. While Cinnamon probably isn’t destined to become my desktop of choice, I don’t dislike it and find it, hands down, the best of the GNOME based desktops I’ve tried so far. Anybody looking for a powerful, all purpose distro that’s designed to work smoothly and which can be mastered with ease would be hard pressed to find anything better.

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The subtle art of the Desktop

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The history of the Gnome and KDE desktops go a long way back and their competition, for the lack of a better term, is almost as famous in some circles as the religious divide between Emacs and Vi. But is that competition stil relevant in 2016? Are there notable differences between Gnome and KDE that would position each other on a specific segment of users? Having both desktops running on my systems (workstation + laptop) but using really only one of them at all times, I wanted to find out by myself.

My workstation and laptop both run ArchLinux, which means I tend to run the latest stable versions of pretty much any desktop software. I will thus be considering the latest stable versions from Gnome and KDE in this post. Historically, the two environments stem from different technical platforms: Gnome relies on the GTK framework while KDE, or more exactly the Plasma desktop environment, relies on Qt. For a long time, that is until well into the development of the Gnome 3.x platform, the major difference was not just technical, it was one of style and experience. KDE used to offer a desktop experience that was built along the lines of Windows, with a start center on the bottom left, a customizable side bar, and desktop widgets. Gnome had its two bars on the top and bottom of the screen, and was seemingly used as the basis for the first design of Mac OS X, with the top bar offering features that were later found in the Apple operating system.

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Xubuntu 16.04.1 LTS Released, Upgrade Path from Xubuntu 14.04 LTS Now Open

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Ubuntu

The first point release of the Xubuntu 16.04 LTS computer operating system has been officially published as part of the Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS (Xenial Xerus) announcement earlier in the week.

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Oracle Outs VirtualBox 5.1.2 with Better Support for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5

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Red Hat

Oracle announced the release of the first maintenance update to the VirtualBox 5.1 series of the open-source and cross-platform virtualization software for all supported computer operating systems.

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Internet of Things Web Editor Open Source Project Started

Filed under
OSS

The StackSavings Web Editor has recently been launched as an open source project. The aim of the project is to be a Web Editor for the Internet of Things.

The IoT web editor is built on Amazon Web Services cloud platform and is working toward the goal of providing an easy to use web editor interface.

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GNOME Software 3.22 Will Support Installation of Snaps, Flatpak Repository Files

Filed under
GNOME

The GNOME 3.21.4 desktop environment was released last week, which means that many of the default applications and components were updated with bug fixes and various enhancements.

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openSUSE Leap 42.2 Now Merged with SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 2

Filed under
SUSE

The development cycle of the openSUSE Leap 42.2 operating system continues, and today we would like to inform our readers about the availability of the third and last Alpha build in the series.

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Linux 4.7 and Linux 4.8

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux Kernel 4.7 Officially Released, Introduces Support for Radeon RX480 GPUs

    Today, July 24, 2016, after a week of holiday fun, Linus Torvalds has had the great pleasure of announcing the release of Linux kernel 4.7 for all GNU/Linux operating systems.

    The Linux 4.7 kernel has been in development for the past two months, but that shouldn't surprise anyone who is either reading our website on a regular basis or keeping pace with the Linux kernel development cycle, which was very normal for this branch. A total of seven Release Candidate (RC) testing builds were released since May 29, 2016, which introduced numerous new features and improvements.

  • The Biggest Features Of The Linux 4.7 Kernel

    If all goes according to plan, the Linux 4.7 kernel will be released before the day is through.

  • The Size Of Different DRM Graphics Drivers In Linux 4.7

    Last October I looked at The Size Of The Different Open-Source Linux DRM/Mesa Graphics Drivers, but with it being nearly one year since then and Linux 4.7 due out today, I decided to run some fresh L.O.C. measurements on the popular DRM/KMS drivers to see their current sizes.

    This lines-of-code counting was mostly done out of a curiosity factor. In this article I'm just looking at the in-kernel DRM code and not the Mesa drivers, DDX drivers, LLVM back-ends, or anything else in user-space related to the open-source graphics drivers.

  • The Btrfs Windows Driver Updated With RAID Support & Other Features
  • Hardened Usercopy Appears Ready To Be Merged For Linux 4.8

    Yet another Linux kernel security feature coming to the mainline kernel that appears readied for the Linux 4.8 merge window is hardened usercopy.

    Hardened usercopy was originally based upon GrSecurity's PAX_USERCOPY feature but reworked into a whole new form, according to developer Kees Cook at Google. This hardened usercopy is to be exposed as the CONFIG_HARDENED_USERCOPY option within the kernel.

Ubuntu MATE 16.04.1 LTS Fixes the Raspberry Pi Partition Resizer, Adds MATE 1.14

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

As part of the Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS (Xenial Xerus) announcement, Martin Wimpress informs us about the release of the Ubuntu MATE 16.04.1 LTS operating systems for users of Ubuntu MATE 16.04 LTS.

Ubuntu MATE 16.04.1 LTS is not a major release, and if your Ubuntu MATE 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) installation is up to date, you already have the latest software updates and security patches that have been injected in the new installation mediums generated mainly for those who want to reinstall or deploy the OS on new systems.

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elementary OS 0.4 "Loki" Gets New Beta with over 70 Bugfixes, RC1 Coming Next

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The guys over elementary OS have released a second Beta version of the highly anticipated elementary OS 0.4 "Loki" operating system, fixing numerous of the issues reported by users since the first Beta.

This time, the announcement was made by Daniel 'DanRabbit' Foré, who reports that more than 70 bugs reported by public beta testers since last month's Beta release have been squashed, and that many of the fixes are in fact configuration changes, which means that they won't be available to those running the first Beta build, so they'll have to make a fresh install.

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4MLinux 19.0 Distro to Ship with GCC 6.1.0 and Qt 5.7, Public Beta Out Now

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Zbigniew Konojacki informs Softpedia about the availability of the public Beta release f his upcoming 4MLinux 19.0 GNU/Linux distribution, which comes one week after the release of the 4MLinux 19.0 Core edition.

As reported by us in the second week of July, the Beta release of 4MLinux 19.0 Core, which the developer uses as the base for all the distributions and distrolettes that are being distributed as part of the 4MLinux family, including 4MParted, 4MRescueKit, BakAndImgCD, 4MRecover, and Antivirus Live CD, the operating system uses the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) 6.1.0.

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Why Open Source is gaining momentum in Digital Transformation?

Filed under
OSS

Once upon a time in IT, using open source simply meant Linux instead of Windows, or maybe MySQL instead of Oracle.

Now, there is such a huge diversity of open source tools, and almost every leading digital business and tech startup is making extensive use of them. It’s been a remarkable turnaround for open source over the last 10 years, placing the trend firmly at the heart of the digital revolution.

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Linux 4.7

Filed under
Linux

So, after a slight delay due to my travels, I'm back, and 4.7 is out.

Despite it being two weeks since rc7, the final patch wasn't all that
big, and much of it is trivial one- and few-liners. There's a couple
of network drivers that got a bit more loving. Appended is the
shortlog since rc7 for people who care: it's fairly spread out, with
networking and some intel Kabylake GPU fixes being the most noticeable
ones. But there's random small noise spread all over.

Read more

Also: Linux 4.7 Kernel Officially Released

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More in Tux Machines

Feral Interactive Ports Life Is Strange to Linux and Mac, Episode 1 Is Now Free

Feral Interactive has recently announced that they have managed to successfully port the popular, award-winning Life Is Strange game to GNU/Linux and Mac OS X operating systems. Read more

Introduction to Modularity

Modularity is an exciting, new initiative aimed at resolving the issue of diverging (and occasionally conflicting) lifecycles of different “components” within Fedora. A great example of a diverging and conflicting lifecycle is the Ruby on Rails (RoR) lifecycle, whereby Fedora stipulates that itself can only have one version of RoR at any point in time – but that doesn’t mean Fedora’s version of RoR won’t conflict with another version of RoR used in an application. Therefore, we want to avoid having “components”, like RoR, conflict with other existing components within Fedora. Read more

Our First Look at Linux Mint 18 Cinnamon

Now that I’ve had about a week to play around in Mint 18, I find a lot to like and have no major complaints. While Cinnamon probably isn’t destined to become my desktop of choice, I don’t dislike it and find it, hands down, the best of the GNOME based desktops I’ve tried so far. Anybody looking for a powerful, all purpose distro that’s designed to work smoothly and which can be mastered with ease would be hard pressed to find anything better. Read more

The subtle art of the Desktop

The history of the Gnome and KDE desktops go a long way back and their competition, for the lack of a better term, is almost as famous in some circles as the religious divide between Emacs and Vi. But is that competition stil relevant in 2016? Are there notable differences between Gnome and KDE that would position each other on a specific segment of users? Having both desktops running on my systems (workstation + laptop) but using really only one of them at all times, I wanted to find out by myself. My workstation and laptop both run ArchLinux, which means I tend to run the latest stable versions of pretty much any desktop software. I will thus be considering the latest stable versions from Gnome and KDE in this post. Historically, the two environments stem from different technical platforms: Gnome relies on the GTK framework while KDE, or more exactly the Plasma desktop environment, relies on Qt. For a long time, that is until well into the development of the Gnome 3.x platform, the major difference was not just technical, it was one of style and experience. KDE used to offer a desktop experience that was built along the lines of Windows, with a start center on the bottom left, a customizable side bar, and desktop widgets. Gnome had its two bars on the top and bottom of the screen, and was seemingly used as the basis for the first design of Mac OS X, with the top bar offering features that were later found in the Apple operating system. Read more