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Thursday, 27 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux and Linux Foundation Roy Schestowitz 28/04/2017 - 3:45am
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 28/04/2017 - 3:45am
Story Qt 5.10 and digiKam Roy Schestowitz 28/04/2017 - 3:44am
Story GNOME/Unity in Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 28/04/2017 - 3:44am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 28/04/2017 - 3:43am
Story Leftovers: Software (Subsurface, GRUB, GIMP, and Todo.txt) Roy Schestowitz 28/04/2017 - 3:42am
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 28/04/2017 - 3:41am
Story Linux Devices Roy Schestowitz 28/04/2017 - 3:40am
Story Halium, Tizen, and Android Roy Schestowitz 28/04/2017 - 3:39am
Story Leftovers: OSS and Sharing Roy Schestowitz 28/04/2017 - 3:37am

Linux and Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Qt 5.10 and digiKam

Filed under
Development
KDE
  • Qt 5.10 Platform Support Changes Being Discussed

    Qt developers have begun a fresh round of discussions over the supported platforms / operating systems of Qt 5.10 that will be released in the later part of this calendar years.

    Among the officially supported Linux distribution changes would be moving to RHEL 7.3, openSUSE Leap 42.2, Ubuntu 17.04 (still keeping around 16.04 LTS too), moving the Windows MinGW to MinGW 6.3, and more.

  • digiKam – A Professional Photo Editing and Management Software

    digiKam is an advanced cross-platform digital photo management app inspired by photographers’ needs to view, tweak, enhance, organize, and share photographs across Linux systems.

    It possesses all the tools and feature set necessary to process, manage, organize, and transfer photographs, videos, and RAW files – while consistently receiving optimization upgrades to its feature set and workflow.

GNOME/Unity in Ubuntu

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

Leftovers: Software (Subsurface, GRUB, GIMP, and Todo.txt)

Filed under
Software
  • Announcing Subsurface 4.6.4

    The Subsurface development team proudly announces the release 4.6.4 of Subsurface, an open source dive log and dive planning program for Windows, Mac and Linux.

  • Subsurface 4.6.4 Open-Source Dive Log and Planning Tool Adds Many Improvements

    The development team behind the Subsurface open-source dive log and dive planning application was proud to announce the immediate availability for download of the Subsurface 4.6.4 release.

    Subsurface 4.6.4 is the latest stable version of the popular program developed by Linus Torvalds in collaboration with other developers, and adds a great number of improvements over previous builds. These include a new planner mode to calculate minimum gas, better handling of notes when replanning dives, as well as support for the border width setting in printing templates.

  • GRUB 2.02 Bootloader Officially Released with ZFS LZ4 & LVM RAID1 Support, More

    The long-anticipated GRUB 2.02 open-source bootloader software project was finally promoted to the stable channel after being in Beta stages of development for the past few years.

    The development team took their time to finalize the release of GRUB 2.02, which should soon make its way into the stable software repositories of your favorite operating system, but it's finally here and we want to thank them for all their hard work and the awesome new features and improvements implemented so far.

  • [New] GIMP review

    GIMP (short for GNU Image Manipulation Program) is a free alternative to Photoshop that more than holds its own. But don't think that the lack of a price tag means GIMP is lacking in features; it packs enough punch to genuinely rival Adobe's imaging behemoth.

    GIMP comes with impressive selection and montage features, various ways to retouch your images, cropping, noise reduction and colour adjustment tools, customisable brushes, gradients and so much more. There's plenty for the more advanced user, too, including layer masks, bezier curves, filters and even an animation package.

  • Todo.txt – A Nifty ToDo Indicator Applet for Ubuntu

    Todo.txt is an extremely simple indicator applet that lets you quickly tick off the tasks contained in your todo.txt file. It lives in the system tray and has options: Edit todo.txt, Clear completed, and refresh.

    Ultimately, its job is to help you edit your todo.txt file and mark tasks as completed without needing to open a full-fledged text editing application.

Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Help Wanted: Open Source Oscilloscope on Rigol Hardware

    We’ve often heard (and said) if you can’t hack it, you don’t own it. We noticed that [tmbinc] has issued a call for help on his latest project: developing new firmware and an FPGA configuration for the Rigol DS1054Z and similar scopes. It isn’t close to completion, but it isn’t a pipe dream either. [tmbinc] has successfully booted Linux.

    There’s plenty left to do, though. He’s loading a boot loader via JTAG and booting Linux from the USB port. Clearly, you’d want to flash all that. Linux gives him use of the USB port, the LCD, the network jack, and the front panel LEDs and buttons. However, all of the actual scope electronics, the FPGA functions, and the communications between the processor and the FPGA are all forward work.

  • Raspberry WebKiosk 6.0 Released for Raspberry Pi, Based on Raspbian Jessie Lite

    Binary Emotions informs Softpedia today about the general availability of Raspberry WebKiosk 6.0, a major update to the Open Source project that tries to develop the cheapest possible web kiosk operating systems for Raspberry Pi SBCs.

  • Rugged, Linux-friendly module taps Apollo Lake

    Axiomtek’s “CEM313” COM Express Compact module runs on Intel Apollo Lake, and offers -20 to 70°C support, vibration resistance, and an optional carrier.

    The CEM313 is Axiomtek’s first computer-on-module to support Intel’s recent Apollo Lake generation of system-on-chips. The 95 x 95mm COM Express Compact Type 6 module lacks Atom E3900 support, but can load the quad-core Pentium N4200 or dual-core Celeron N3350, running at up to 2.5GHz and 2.3GHz, respectively, each with 6W TDPs. The Linux- and Windows-10 supported module is available with the same CEB94006 carrier board offered with its Intel Bay Trail based CEM841, CEM842, and CEM843 COM Express modules.

Halium, Tizen, and Android

Filed under
Android
Linux

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • GitHub open sources OctoDNS, new tool for managing DNS records

    The frailty of the DNS system became all too evident last year, when DNS host Dyn was hit by a major Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack that brought down large swaths of the internet. With the threat of DDoS attacks only expected to grow, experts urge organizations to build redundancy into their DNS services.

  • 10 Pioneers taking open source to the next level

    Open source changed the software game, introduced in the mid-1980’s but really making an impact in the late 1990’s and introducing a free, collaborative approach to software development.

  • The Future of Big Data: Distilling Less Knowledge Per Bit

    Until recently, the word data didn’t require a modifier. But we passed a watershed moment when we started referring to big data. Apparently, that wasn’t a sufficient description for some chunks of data, because people grasped for bolder terms, such as humongous data. Sadly, now, it appears that we have run out of appropriate adjectives. And yet data keeps getting bigger and bigger.

  • Ignorance of open source law is no defense [Ed: uses fear of security and licensing issues to sell its services. Proprietary software is even worse in that regard.]

    While Open Source Software (OSS) has been around for decades, commercial software companies have had their traditional software design process flipped upside down in the last 10 years. When classic commercial software packages were first created years ago, there was very little third-party compliance that was required.

  • Open source is the future of teaching

    The work of teaching in developing countries is often hindered by an absence of basic resources, a lack of infrastructure, as well as underfunding, corruption and sociopolitical instability.

    Given these realities, how can we develop teachers in a way that promotes quality education for all?

    Open education resources (OERs) are freely accessible, openly licensed materials that are available online for anyone to use in teaching and learning. They have the potential to build capacity by providing educators with direct access, at low or no cost, to ways in which they can develop their competence.

Solus Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.9.24 LTS, New Repo Sync Tool Coming Soon

Filed under
GNU
Linux

It's been more than a week since Solus Project launched the new Solus ISO snapshot, along with the first release of the Solus GNOME Edition, and Joshua Strobl is back with another installation of the This Week In Solus (TWiS) newsletter.

This Week In Solus Install 43 delivers both good and bad news to Solus users. We'll start with the good news, as the distribution is now powered by the Linux 4.9.24 LTS kernel, and the ypkg build tool was updated to version 21, a maintenance release that adds a few improvements. The solbuild build system has been updated as well, and it's now compatible with the latest libgit2 library.

Read more

GStreamer 1.12.0 release candidate 2 (1.11.91)

Filed under
GNOME

Debian 9.0 "Stretch" Might Not Have UEFI Secure Boot Support

Filed under
Debian

Debian 9.0 "Stretch" has seen UEFI Secure Boot support no longer being considered a release blocker but is now just a stretch goal for this upcoming release.

Debian developer Jonathan Wiltshire shared that while Secure Boot support was planned for Debian 9.0, it might not happen now due to short on time and resources. Secure Boot might still work its way though into a later Debian 9.x update.

Read more

Development News: Rust 1.17 and SourceForge

Filed under
Development
  • Announcing Rust 1.17

    The Rust team is happy to announce the latest version of Rust, 1.17.0. Rust is a systems programming language focused on safety, speed, and concurrency.

  • Rust 1.17 Released

    Judging by the massive Rust fan base in our forums, those of you reading this will be delighted today about the newest version of Rustlang, v1.17.

  • SourceForge: Let's hold hands in a post-CodePlex world [Ed: Microsoft Gavin needlessly interjects Microsoft into it. Like CodePlex was EVER relevant…]

    President Logan Abbott has said he’ll seek tighter integration between SourceForge’s tools and those of others – including giant rival GitHub.

Nouveau Re-Clocked With DRM-Next Linux 4.12 + Mesa 17.2-dev vs. NVIDIA 381 Driver

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

A few days back I posted benchmarks of the initial GTX 1050/1060/1070/1080 Nouveau 3D support. As expected, the performance was rather abysmal with re-clocking not being available for Pascal (or Maxwell) GPUs on this open-source NVIDIA Linux kernel driver. For those trying to use Nouveau for Linux games or care about your GPU clock speeds, currently the GTX 600/700 "Kepler" series is still your best bet or the GTX 750 "Maxwell 1" is the last NVIDIA graphics processors not requiring signed firmware images and can properly -- but manually -- re-clock with the current Nouveau driver.

Read more

Coverage From Recent Linux Conferences

Filed under
Linux

Supply Chain Case Study: Canonical and Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

I love talking about supply chain management in an open source software context, especially as it applies to managing collaborative processes between upstream projects and their downstream products. In the article linked above, I called out a couple of examples of supply chain management: an enterprise OpenStack distribution and a container management product utilizing Kubernetes and Docker for upstream platforms.

What about anti-patterns or things to avoid? There are several we could call out. At the risk of picking on someone I like, I’ll choose Canonical simply because they’ve been in the headlines recently for changes they’ve made to their organization, cutting back on some efforts and laying off some people. As I look at Canonical from a product offering perspective, there’s a lot they got right, which others could benefit from. But they also made many mistakes, some of which could have been avoided. First, the good.

Read more

Linux's Big Bang: One Kernel, Countless Distros

Filed under
Linux

Even if you're a newcomer to Linux, you've probably figured out that it is not a single, monolithic operating system, but a constellation of projects. The different "stars" in this constellation take the form of "distributions," or "distros." Each offers its own take on the Linux model.

To gain an appreciation of the plethora of options offered by the range of distributions, it helps to understand how Linux started out and subsequently proliferated. With that in mind, here's a brief introduction to Linux's history.

Read more

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
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GNOME/Unity in Ubuntu

today's howtos

Leftovers: Software (Subsurface, GRUB, GIMP, and Todo.txt)

  • Announcing Subsurface 4.6.4
    The Subsurface development team proudly announces the release 4.6.4 of Subsurface, an open source dive log and dive planning program for Windows, Mac and Linux.
  • Subsurface 4.6.4 Open-Source Dive Log and Planning Tool Adds Many Improvements
    The development team behind the Subsurface open-source dive log and dive planning application was proud to announce the immediate availability for download of the Subsurface 4.6.4 release. Subsurface 4.6.4 is the latest stable version of the popular program developed by Linus Torvalds in collaboration with other developers, and adds a great number of improvements over previous builds. These include a new planner mode to calculate minimum gas, better handling of notes when replanning dives, as well as support for the border width setting in printing templates.
  • GRUB 2.02 Bootloader Officially Released with ZFS LZ4 & LVM RAID1 Support, More
    The long-anticipated GRUB 2.02 open-source bootloader software project was finally promoted to the stable channel after being in Beta stages of development for the past few years. The development team took their time to finalize the release of GRUB 2.02, which should soon make its way into the stable software repositories of your favorite operating system, but it's finally here and we want to thank them for all their hard work and the awesome new features and improvements implemented so far.
  • [New] GIMP review
    GIMP (short for GNU Image Manipulation Program) is a free alternative to Photoshop that more than holds its own. But don't think that the lack of a price tag means GIMP is lacking in features; it packs enough punch to genuinely rival Adobe's imaging behemoth. GIMP comes with impressive selection and montage features, various ways to retouch your images, cropping, noise reduction and colour adjustment tools, customisable brushes, gradients and so much more. There's plenty for the more advanced user, too, including layer masks, bezier curves, filters and even an animation package.
  • Todo.txt – A Nifty ToDo Indicator Applet for Ubuntu
    Todo.txt is an extremely simple indicator applet that lets you quickly tick off the tasks contained in your todo.txt file. It lives in the system tray and has options: Edit todo.txt, Clear completed, and refresh. Ultimately, its job is to help you edit your todo.txt file and mark tasks as completed without needing to open a full-fledged text editing application.

Red Hat News