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Sunday, 26 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Games for GNU/Linux Rianne Schestowitz 26/02/2017 - 10:08pm
Story Linux 4.9.13 Rianne Schestowitz 26/02/2017 - 6:11pm
Story OSS Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 26/02/2017 - 6:07pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 26/02/2017 - 4:12pm
Story UKSM Is Still Around For Data Deduplication Of The Linux Kernel Roy Schestowitz 26/02/2017 - 4:09pm
Story Why Dell’s gamble on Linux laptops has paid off Roy Schestowitz 26/02/2017 - 3:32pm
Story A Short MATE Desktop 1.17 Review in February 2017 Roy Schestowitz 26/02/2017 - 3:19pm
Story Linux Graphics Roy Schestowitz 26/02/2017 - 3:17pm
Story Linux From Scratch 8.0 Released, Adding Major Changes Roy Schestowitz 1 26/02/2017 - 3:03pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 26/02/2017 - 2:25pm

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Linux 4.9.13

Filed under
Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 4.9.13 kernel.

All users of the 4.9 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.9.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.9.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

Read more

Also: Linux 4.4.52

Linux 4.10.1

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • What motivates the open-source community?

    Many of us will have been involved in a free-software community that ran out of steam, and either ended up moribund or just plain died. Some of us will have gone through such cycles more than once; it's never nice to watch something that used to be a vibrant community in its death throes. Knowing what motivates the sort of people who get heavily involved in free software projects is really useful when trying to keep them motivated, and a systematic approach to understanding this is what Rina Jensen, Strategist at Mozilla, talked about at FOSDEM 2017.

    Mozilla talks a lot about promoting innovation and opportunity on the web, and the organization does care a lot about those objectives, but the realities of day-to-day life can interfere and make working toward them tedious. The thinking was that if Mozilla could help make the experience for contributors better, then the contributors could make Mozilla better — but doing that required understanding how things could be better for contributors.

  • Shuttle Music Player is now Open Source

    Music is a major part of everyone’s life, and our smartphones allow us to truly enjoy our music anywhere. Over the years, Android has received a fair share of excellent music player apps, and Shuttle Music Player has managed to stand out.

    Shuttle is a music player following Google’s Material Design guidelines, and its listing is nearing 4 Million downloads. Currently, the app offers two versions: free and paid. The paid version is priced at $0.99 and has received over 50 thousand downloads on the Play Store already.

  • OpenStack isn’t dead. It’s boring. That’s a good thing.

    The first OpenStack Project Teams Gathering (PTG) event was held this week in Atlanta. The week was broken into two parts: cross-project work on Monday and Tuesday, and individual projects Wednesday through Friday. I was there for the first two days and heard a few discussions that started the same way.

  • NetBSD 7.1_RC2 available
  • NetBSD 7.1 RC2 Released

    The second release candidate to the upcoming NetBSD 7.1 is now available for testing.

    NetBSD 7.1 RC2 is primarily comprised of fixes since 7.1 RC1, and in particular, security fixes. The raw list of NetBSD 7.1 changes can be found here.

  • Pentagon Launches Open-Source Experiment

    With a new website showcasing federal software code, the Pentagon is the latest government entity to join the open-source movement.

    The Defense Department this week launched Code.mil, a public site that will eventually showcase unclassified code written by federal employees. Citizens will be able to use that code for personal and public projects. Code written by government employees can be shared with the public because that material usually isn't covered by copyright protections in the U.S., according to the Pentagon.

  • Coder Dojo: Kids Teaching Themselves Programming

    Despite not much advertising, word has gotten around and we typically have 5-7 kids on Dojo nights, enough that all the makerspace's Raspberry Pi workstations are filled and we sometimes have to scrounge for more machines for the kids who don't bring their own laptops.

    A fun moment early on came when we had a mentor meeting, and Neil, our head organizer (who deserves most of the credit for making this program work so well), looked around and said "One thing that might be good at some point is to get more men involved." Sure enough -- he was the only man in the room! For whatever reason, most of the programmers who have gotten involved have been women. A refreshing change from the usual programming group. (Come to think of it, the PEEC web development team is three women. A girl could get a skewed idea of gender demographics, living here.) The kids who come to program are about 40% girls.

  • Microsoft hasn't turned a phone into a PC just yet [Ed: copying GNU/Linux again]

    Using the Lapdock wired to the X3 charges the phone and provides the most reliable connection for Continuum. I found the wireless connection made things a little unreliable and choppy on some more graphically intense things like full-screen video playback. Connecting the phone is as simple as just plugging it in and watching a Windows 10 desktop burst to life on the Lapdock.

    While the Windows 10 desktop looks familiar, this is exactly when I realized just how limited Continuum really is. There’s a Start Menu that’s basically the home screen of a Windows phone, and access to Cortana, but there’s a lot missing. Things like putting apps side by side simply don’t exist in this Continuum world, nor do a lot of the typical places you’d right-click on apps or use keyboard shortcuts to get to the desktop. If you’re a Windows power user like me, or even if you’re just used to a standard window management system, it’s immediately frustrating.

UKSM Is Still Around For Data Deduplication Of The Linux Kernel

Filed under
Development
Linux

Several years back we wrote about Ultra Kernel Samepage Merging (UKSM) for data de-duplication within the Linux kernel for transparently scanning all application memory and de-duping it where possible. While the original developer is no longer active, a new developer has been maintaining the work and continues to support it on the latest Linux kernel releases.

Read more

Why Dell’s gamble on Linux laptops has paid off

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The whole juggernaut that is now Linux on Dell started as the brainchild of two core individuals, Barton George (Senior Principal Engineer) and Jared Dominguez (OS Architect and Linux Engineer).

It was their vision that began it all back in 2012. It was long hours, uncertain futures and sheer belief that people really did want Linux laptops that sustained them. Here is the untold story of how Dell gained the top spot in preinstalled Linux on laptops.

Where do you start when no one has ever really even touched such a concept? The duo did have some experience of the area before. George explained that the XPS and M3800 Linux developer’s laptops weren’t Dell’s first foray into Linux laptops. Those with long memories may remember Dell testing the waters for a brief while by having a Linux offering alongside Windows laptops. By their own admission it didn’t work out. “We misread the market,” commented George.

Read more

Also: New Entroware Aether Laptop for Linux Powered with Ubuntu

A Short MATE Desktop 1.17 Review in February 2017

Filed under
GNU
Linux

MATE 1.17 is a testing release, it has no official announcement like 1.16 stable release (odd = unstable, even = stable). But what made me interested is because Ubuntu MATE 17.04 includes it by default so I write this short review. The most fundamental news is about MATE Desktop is now completely ported to GTK+3 leaving behind GTK+2. You may be interested seeing few changes and I have tried Ubuntu MATE 17.04 Alpha 2 to review MATE 1.17 below. Enjoy MATE 1.17!

Read more

Also: What's up with the hate towards Freedesktop?

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Linux From Scratch 8.0 Released, Adding Major Changes

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux From Scratch is a book which can be used to build an independent Linux distribution which doesn’t use any other Linux distribution as a base. It teaches you how things work under the hood and how to compile software and build your own Linux system. The guide is also free for all.

BLFS (Beyond Linux from Scratch) is an additional guide which will take you through graphical user interfaces setup, printing support, networking and more. It also contains a lot of great information.

Read more

Software Freedom Conservancy Funding

Filed under
GNU
Legal
  • Software Freedom Conservancy matching

    Non-profits that provide project support have proven themselves to be necessary for the success and advancement of individual projects and Free Software as a whole. The Free Software Foundation (founded in 1985) serves as a home to GNU projects and a canonical list of Free Software licenses. The Open Source Initiative came about in 1998, maintaining the Open Source Definition, based on the Debian Free Software Guidelines, with affiliate members including Debian, Mozilla, and the Wikimedia Foundation. Software in the Public Interest (SPI) was created in the late 90s largely to act as a fiscal sponsor for projects like Debian, enabling it to do things like accept donations and handle other financial transactions.

  • Clojars is Conservancy’s Newest Member Project

    Software Freedom Conservancy is pleased to announce the addition of Clojars as its newest member project. Clojars is a community-maintained repository for free and open source libraries written in the Clojure programming language. Clojars emphasizes ease of use, publishing library packages that are simple to use with build automation tools.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • systemd 233 about to be released, please help testing

    systemd 233 is scheduled to be released next week, and there is only a handful of small issues left. As usual there are tons of improvements and fixes, but the most intrusive one probably is another attempt to move from legacy cgroup v1 to a “hybrid” setup where the new unified (cgroup v2) hierarchy is mounted at /sys/fs/cgroup/unified/ and the legacy one stays at /sys/fs/cgroup/ as usual. This should provide an easier path for software like Docker or LXC to migrate to the unified hiearchy, but even that hybrid mode broke some bits.

  • Keep : A personal shell command keeper

    Introducing a new command line tool which solves the issue of memorizing commands or storing them somewhere which is difficult to find. With the grep and run commands, one can easily find their long forgotten commands and use them them right away.

  • qutebrowser v0.10.0 released

    I'm happy to annouce the release of qutebrowser v0.10.0!

    qutebrowser is a keyboard driven browser with a vim-like, minimalistic interface. It's written using PyQt and cross-platform.

    I haven't announced the v0.9.0 release in this blog (or any patch releases), but for v0.10.0 it definitely makes sense to do so, as it's mostly centered on QtWebEngine!

  • GNOME Pomodoro: A Pomodoro Timer With AppIndicator And GNOME Shell Support

    GNOME Pomodoro is, like the name suggests, a Pomodoro timer for GNOME. The application website mentions that it's currently only for GNOME Shell, however, an AppIndicator is also available.

  • 7 Awesome Open Source Build Automation Tools For Sysadmin/DevOps/Developers

    Build automation is a vital tool for devops, sysadmins, and developers. It is nothing but scripting or automating the process of compiling source code into binary. Sysadmins can use build tools to manage and update config files. Following is a list of awesome open source and popular tools associated with automating build processes on Linux or Unix-like system.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Major Cloudflare bug leaked sensitive data from customers’ websites

    Cloudflare revealed a serious bug in its software today that caused sensitive data like passwords, cookies, authentication tokens to spill in plaintext from its customers’ websites. The announcement is a major blow for the content delivery network, which offers enhanced security and performance for more than 5 million websites.

    This could have allowed anyone who noticed the error to collect a variety of very personal information that is typically encrypted or obscured.

  • SHA1 collisions make Git vulnerable to attakcs by third-parties, not just repo maintainers

    After sitting through an endless flood of headless-chicken messages on multiple media about SHA-1 being fatally broken, I thought I'd do a quick writeup about what this actually means.

  • Torvalds patches git to mitigate against SHA-1 attacks

    Linux creator Linus Torvalds says two sets of patches have been posted for the distributed version control system git to mitigate against SHA-1 attacks which are based on the method that Dutch and Google engineers detailed last week.

    The post by Torvalds detailing this came after reports emerged of the version control system used by the WebKit browser engine repository becoming corrupted after the two proof-of-concept PDF files that were released by the Dutch and Google researchers were uploaded to the repository.

  • Linus Torvalds on "SHA1 collisions found"
  • More from Torvalds on SHA1 collisions

    I thought I'd write an update on git and SHA1, since the SHA1 collision attack was so prominently in the news.

    Quick overview first, with more in-depth explanation below:

    (1) First off - the sky isn't falling. There's a big difference between using a cryptographic hash for things like security signing, and using one for generating a "content identifier" for a content-addressable system like git.

    (2) Secondly, the nature of this particular SHA1 attack means that it's actually pretty easy to mitigate against, and there's already been two sets of patches posted for that mitigation.

    (3) And finally, there's actually a reasonably straightforward transition to some other hash that won't break the world - or even old git repositories.

  • [Older] Wire’s independent security review

    Ever since Wire launched end-to-end encryption and open sourced its apps one question has consistently popped up: “Is there an independent security review available?” Well, there is now!

  • Malware Lets a Drone Steal Data by Watching a Computer’s Blinking LED
  • FCC to halt rule that protects your private data from security breaches

    The Federal Communications Commission plans to halt implementation of a privacy rule that requires ISPs to protect the security of its customers' personal information.

    The data security rule is part of a broader privacy rulemaking implemented under former Chairman Tom Wheeler but opposed by the FCC's new Republican majority. The privacy order's data security obligations are scheduled to take effect on March 2, but Chairman Ajit Pai wants to prevent that from happening.

    The data security rule requires ISPs and phone companies to take "reasonable" steps to protect customers' information—such as Social Security numbers, financial and health information, and Web browsing data—from theft and data breaches.

    "Chairman Pai is seeking to act on a request to stay this rule before it takes effect on March 2," an FCC spokesperson said in a statement to Ars.

  • Google releases details of another Windows bug
  • How to secure the IoT in your organisation: advice and best practice for securing the Internet of Things

    All of the major technology vendors are making a play in the Internet of Things space and there are few organisations that won’t benefit from collecting and analysing the vast array of new data that will be made available.

    But the recent Mirai botnet is just one example of the tremendous vulnerabilities that exist with unsecured access points. What are the main security considerations and best practices, then, for businesses seeking to leverage the potential of IoT?

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • FEDORA and GNOME at UNSAAC

    Today I did a talk to introduce students of UNSAAC to the Fedora and GNOME world as it was announced by the GDG Cusco group. We started at 8:30 am and it was a free event:

  • GNOME Theme For Firefox Gets Updated, Looking Great

    There are a lot of complete themes for Firefox. We spoke about 3 of them in one of our previous articles. The good news today is that “GNOME 3” theme (which was also called Adwaita) for Firefox was updated. Now it’s working with all versions higher than Firefox 45.

    Previously, the theme didn’t work with the recent versions of Firefox. So people had to switch to other available themes. Fortunately, this finally changed today when another developer took the code, fixed the compatibility problems and re-released the theme.

  • GStreamer Now Supports Multi-Threaded Scaling/Conversion For Big Performance Win

    With the addition of over two thousand lines of code, GStreamer's video-convert code within gst-plugins-base is now properly multi-threaded.

    Video scaling and conversion can now be multi-threaded when using GStreamer. With this multi-threading work by Sebastian Dröge, he commented with the commit, "During tests, this gave up to 1.8x speedup with 2 threads and up to 3.2x speedup with 4 threads when converting e.g. 1080p to 4k in v210."

Linux and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • OpenRISC For Linux 4.11 Gets Some Optimizations, Prepares For SMP

    OpenRISC continues advancing with its sights on being a free and open processor for embedded systems using the RISC instruction set architecture.

    Last year the Linux kernel got a new OpenRISC maintainer and for Linux 4.11 there is a fair amount of interesting changes for the OpenRISC code within the mainline tree.

  • drm for v4.11 - main pull request

    The tinydrm code seems like absolute pure shit that has never seen a compiler.

    I'm upset, because I expect better quality control. In fact, I expect
    *some* qualitty control, and this piece-of-shit driver has clearly
    seen none at all.

    And those patches were apparently committed yesterday.

    WHAT THE ACTUAL FUCK?

  • [Old] A Guide Through The Linux Sound API Jungle

    At the Audio MC at the Linux Plumbers Conference one thing became very clear: it is very difficult for programmers to figure out which audio API to use for which purpose and which API not to use when doing audio programming on Linux.

  • Mesa, Vulkan & Other Driver Talks From 2017 Embedded Linux Conference
  • Fuzzing Mesa Drivers Begin To Uncover Bugs

    Last December we wrote about work being done on fuzzing OpenGL shaders leading to wild differences with the work being done at the Imperial College London. While they were testing other drivers on different operating systems, they have now fired up tests of Mesa.

  • Wayland's Weston 2.0 Compositor Released

    Wayland 1.13 was released earlier this week but the adjoining Weston compositor update didn't happen at the same time due to some last minute changes needing more time to test, but this Friday, Weston 2.0 is now shipping.

    But before getting too excited, Weston 2.0 doesn't represent some break-through changes but rather was bumped away from the Wayland versioning rhythm due to its new output configuration API breaking Weston's ABI. Thus the major version bump.

  • weston 2.0.0

    Welcome to the official release of Weston 2.0. There are no changes since RC2.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Events: IBM Interconnect, foss-north 2017, C++ in Russia

Filed under
OSS
  • What I’m looking forward to at IBM Interconnect 2017

    IBM Interconnect 2017 is coming up next month in Las Vegas. Last year’s conference was a whirlwind of useful talks, inspiring hallway conversations, and great networking opportunities. I was exhausted by the week’s end, but it was totally worth it.

  • foss-north 2017

    After much preparation, the tickets for foss-north 2017 is available at foss-north.se – grab them while they are hot!

  • C++ in Russia, again

    Yesterday during our team meeting Eike told me that I’m a mobile C++ conference nowadays. While it sounds funny, it is true that I’ve been a bit more active than usual.

Manjaro-Arm is Shutting Down

Filed under
GNU
Linux

It is with deep regret that we are announcing that the Manjaro-Arm team is shutting down. I started this project a little over a year ago with no intent to become the sole maintainer.

Read more

KDE and Qt

Filed under
KDE
  • The Novelty of KDE Neon

    The good folks at KDE managed to engage a market of Linux desktop users underserved by other distribution models. Or, maybe it’s just me.

    KDE has a long history in the desktop ecosystem. It was the first Linux desktop I was exposed to back in 2006. Back then, it was on OpenSUSE and it was clean and functional. For some reason after that, installing KDE had never really appealed to me. I’ve tested it out briefly when poking around at what the OpenSUSE guys were doing and I’ve run Kubuntu for brief snippets. For years, I’ve been trying to find out what type of desktop user I am and which distro fits my needs.

  • Tracking KDE Frameworks and Qt

    The KDE-FreeBSD team bumped Qt to 5.7.1 and KDE Frameworks to 5.31.0 in official ports last week, so we’re fairly up-to-date in that department. On FreeBSD, we still fully support Qt4 next to Qt5, so some of the delay in getting this stuff in is due to some shuffling of install locations. In particular, we’ve added qt-chooser in this round of updates, so that qmake is qmake — and no longer qmake-qt4 or some other suffixed binary. We use qt-chooser to switch out one or the other. Checking that this doesn’t break anything else — or at least making sure that everything still compiles — is what took the most time this round of updates.

  • Simple Menu Launcher for KDE Plasma 5.9

    Following "United" theme, there is also "Simple Menu" launcher for KDE Plasma 5.9. It's minimal, a smaller form of full screen menu; it's also clean, showing all applications at once. Honestly, it's UI is similar to Pantheon Menu in elementary OS but including categories. If you like horizontal-oriented menu, Simple Menu is suitable for you. It's available to install from KDE Store. Thanks to Sho for creating Simple Menu.

  • A Simple KDE Twitter Plasmoid

    This KDE Twitter Plasmoids offers a simpler alternative to a desktop Linux twitter app like Choqok. See tweets, send tweets, and check mentions.

  • Telegram desktop client for flatpak #2

    Some time ago I posted a blog post about how I packed telegram desktop client for flatpak. I’ve been updating it since then in some reasonable intervals as I don’t have time to update it more often and mostly because the telegram client’s build system breaks my build quite oftenly. Recently I discovered that someone managed to patch telegram to use system Qt libraries instead of building own patched Qt and building linking it statically. After some time I managed to adjust those patches and make them work with my build which allows me to use Qt from KDE runtimes. Here are new instructions how to get this work:

  • Building the latest greatest for Android AArch64 (with Vulkan teaser)

    Let’s say you got a 64-bit ARM device running Android. For instance, the Tegra X1-based NVIDIA Shield TV. Now, let’s say you are also interested in the latest greatest content from the dev branch, for example to try out some upcoming Vulkan enablers from here and here, and want to see all this running on the big screen with Android TV. How do we get Qt, or at least the basic modules like QtGui, QtQuick, etc. up and running on there?

  • Qt Quick WebGL Streaming

    WebGL Streaming is optimized for Qt Quick and allows you to run remote Qt Quick applications in a browser.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

UKSM Is Still Around For Data Deduplication Of The Linux Kernel

Several years back we wrote about Ultra Kernel Samepage Merging (UKSM) for data de-duplication within the Linux kernel for transparently scanning all application memory and de-duping it where possible. While the original developer is no longer active, a new developer has been maintaining the work and continues to support it on the latest Linux kernel releases. Read more

Why Dell’s gamble on Linux laptops has paid off

The whole juggernaut that is now Linux on Dell started as the brainchild of two core individuals, Barton George (Senior Principal Engineer) and Jared Dominguez (OS Architect and Linux Engineer). It was their vision that began it all back in 2012. It was long hours, uncertain futures and sheer belief that people really did want Linux laptops that sustained them. Here is the untold story of how Dell gained the top spot in preinstalled Linux on laptops. Where do you start when no one has ever really even touched such a concept? The duo did have some experience of the area before. George explained that the XPS and M3800 Linux developer’s laptops weren’t Dell’s first foray into Linux laptops. Those with long memories may remember Dell testing the waters for a brief while by having a Linux offering alongside Windows laptops. By their own admission it didn’t work out. “We misread the market,” commented George. Read more Also: New Entroware Aether Laptop for Linux Powered with Ubuntu

A Short MATE Desktop 1.17 Review in February 2017

MATE 1.17 is a testing release, it has no official announcement like 1.16 stable release (odd = unstable, even = stable). But what made me interested is because Ubuntu MATE 17.04 includes it by default so I write this short review. The most fundamental news is about MATE Desktop is now completely ported to GTK+3 leaving behind GTK+2. You may be interested seeing few changes and I have tried Ubuntu MATE 17.04 Alpha 2 to review MATE 1.17 below. Enjoy MATE 1.17! Read more Also: What's up with the hate towards Freedesktop?