Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Monday, 30 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Mesa Development Roy Schestowitz 30/05/2016 - 8:54pm
Story ZFS Fault Management Daemon Added To FreeBSD Roy Schestowitz 30/05/2016 - 8:51pm
Story ExTiX 16.3 LXQt Distro Is Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, Ships with Linux Kernel 4.6 Rianne Schestowitz 30/05/2016 - 4:41pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 30/05/2016 - 3:42pm
Story Google and Oracle Roy Schestowitz 30/05/2016 - 3:41pm
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 30/05/2016 - 3:38pm
Story Security Leftovers (Parrot Security OS 3.0 “Lithium”, Regulation) Roy Schestowitz 30/05/2016 - 3:35pm
Story Phoronix on Graphics Roy Schestowitz 30/05/2016 - 3:32pm
Story AMD's gaming-optimized AMDGPU-PRO driver for Linux is in beta Roy Schestowitz 30/05/2016 - 3:17pm
Story Ubuntu Touch's Web Browser to Improve the Google Hangouts Experience in OTA-11 Roy Schestowitz 30/05/2016 - 2:40pm

Mesa Development

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Mesa Branched, Mesa 12.0 RC1 Released
  • The Next Mesa Version Is Turning Into A Monstrous Release

    With the main Mesa drivers (Intel, RadeonSI, NVC0) jumping ahead to OpenGL 4.3 and mostly done with OpenGL 4.4/4.5, plus Intel adding their Vulkan driver, and many other improvements over the past three months, the next stable release of Mesa is going to be massive.

    This next version of Mesa is still referred to as Mesa 11.3-dev in Git, with no patches yet proposed for bumping it to Mesa 12.0 considering the new OGL milestones. Anyhow, with the crazy amount of new features I was interested in running some statistics on the code-base to see how its size and evolution compares to earlier Mesa releases. This article provides those numbers.

ZFS Fault Management Daemon Added To FreeBSD

Filed under
BSD

The latest FreeBSD development code has integrated the zfsd daemon.

ZFSD is the ZFS Fault Management Daemon. ZFSD deals with situations like drive faults in ZFS pools with hot-spares and replacements. This comes as the ZFS file-system support in FreeBSD continues to mature and is in quite a good state for ZFS outside of Oracle.

Read more

ExTiX 16.3 LXQt Distro Is Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, Ships with Linux Kernel 4.6

Filed under
Ubuntu

ExTiX developer Arne Exton informs Softpedia today, May 30, 2016, about the immediate availability for download of the ExTiX 16.3 LXQt Edition computer operating system.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • 6 Excellent Console Linux File Managers

    A console application is computer software which can be used with a text-only computer interface, the command line interface, or a text-based interface included within a graphical user interface operating system, such as a terminal emulator (such as GNOME Terminal or the aforementioned Terminator). Whereas a graphical user interface application generally involves using the mouse and keyboard (or touch control), with a console application the primary (and often only) input method is the keyboard. Many console applications are command line tools, but there is a wealth of software that has a text-based user interface making use of ncurses, a library which allow programmers to write text-based user interfaces.

  • PHP Tour 2016 Clermont-Ferrand
  • Enlightenment's EFL Getting New DRM Library

    Chris Michael of Samsung has been working on a new DRM library for the Enlightenment Foundation Libraries (EFL) with a number of improvements.

    The initial implementation of this new library, Ecore_Drm2, has been added to EFL Git.

  • Antergos 2016.05.28 Screenshot Tour
  • Gentoo Linux 20160514 Screenshot Tour
  • First coding week with openSUSE, Google Summer of Code

    Embedded below is the blog of Google Summer of Code student Martin Garcia Monterde. Martin detailed his first week coding with openSUSE and the Google Summer of Code.

  • OpenPHT 1.5.2 for Debian/sid

    I have updated the openpht repository with builds of OpenPHT 1.5.2 for Debian/sid for both amd64 and i386 architecture. For those who have forgotten it, OpenPHT is the open source fork of Plex Home Theater that is used on RasPlex, see my last post concerning OpenPHT for details.

  • vcswatch is now looking for tags

    About a week ago, I extended vcswatch to also look at tags in git repositories.

    Previously, it was solely paying attention to the version number in the top paragraph in debian/changelog, and would alert if that version didn't match the package version in Debian unstable or experimental. The idea is that "UNRELEASED" versions will keep nagging the maintainer (via DDPO) not to forget that some day this package needs an upload. This works for git, svn, bzr, hg, cvs, mtn, and darcs repositories (in decreasing order of actual usage numbers in Debian. I had actually tried to add arch support as well, but that VCS is so weird that it wasn't worth the trouble).

Google and Oracle

Filed under
Google
Security
Legal

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS

Security Leftovers (Parrot Security OS 3.0 “Lithium”, Regulation)

Filed under
Security
  • Parrot Security OS 3.0 “Lithium” — Best Kali Linux Alternative Coming With New Features

    The Release Candidate of Parrot Security OS 3.0 ‘Lithium’ is now available for download. The much-anticipated final release will come in six different editions with the addition of Libre, LXDE, and Studio editions. The version 3.0 of this Kali Linux alternative is based on Debian Jessie and powered by custom hardened Linux 4.5 kernel.

  • Regulation can fix security, except you can't regulate security

    Every time I start a discussion about how we can solve some of our security problems it seems like the topics of professional organizations and regulation are where things end up. I think regulations and professional organizations can fix a lot of problems in an industry, I'm not sure they work for security. First let's talk about why regulation usually works, then, why it won't work for security.

Phoronix on Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

AMD's gaming-optimized AMDGPU-PRO driver for Linux is in beta

Filed under
GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

AMD has been working on a new Linux graphics driver stack, and it’s finally becoming usable. You can install the gaming-optimized AMDGPU-PRO driver on Ubuntu 16.04 today, and Valve just added it to the latest beta version of SteamOS.

Read more

Ubuntu Touch's Web Browser to Improve the Google Hangouts Experience in OTA-11

Filed under
Ubuntu

The long-anticipated OTA-11 update for Ubuntu Phone and Ubuntu Tablet devices is just around the corner, and today we'll have a quick look at what's coming in the Web Browser app.

Read more

Meizu Pro 5 Ubuntu Edition review

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

IT'S NOT EVERY DAY that a smartphone crosses our desk running Canonical's open source Ubuntu operating system.

The Linux-based OS already commands millions of installations across desktops and tablets the world over, and makes a welcome change from the endless run of Android-based devices. Anticipation levels were therefore high and, on first impressions, we believed we were in the presence of a truly desirable smartphone.

Read more

How I used a Raspberry Pi to connect with my grandkids

Filed under
Linux

I finally settled on the CanaKit Raspberry Pi 3 Complete Starter Kit (32 GB edition) which has everything needed to get started except for the display and a keyboard and mouse. It includes the Pi, case, power supply, HDMI video cable, and even heat sinks for the chips.

I looked at several keyboard and mouse options, even a really cool foldable keyboard. I ultimately chose an iPazzPort wireless combination keyboard and touchpad that is small and perfect for kids. It is designed for things like the Raspberry Pi, Android devices, and the Google smart TV. It has a rechargeable battery and a USB cable for that purpose. It is also less expensive than separate keyboard and mouse combinations.

Read more

Ubuntu bq Aquaris M10 Review Part 2: Software

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

In part one of our rather lengthy review, we took a look at the bq Aquaris M10 Ubuntu tablet's hardware. Suffice it to say, it perfectly played the role of a mid-range tablet. While the device had a few ups, like its lightweight design, bright display, and substantial battery, it would have been easily passed for a mediocre slab if not for the software running on it. In this round, we take a deeper look into what makes this tablet truly one of a kind, and almost literally too. This time, we take a dive into the alien world of Ubuntu Touch.

Read more

Best Linux Distro: Linux for old laptops, privacy and USB sticks

Filed under
Linux

Best Linux distro

The best Linux distro is a matter of personal taste and use case. On the following pages, we take you through four potential Linux use cases and select the best for each. We'll look at the best overall OS for general computing, the best for an old laptop, a lightweight distro for USB drives and a privacy-focused option.

Read more

Pravin Satpute: How do you Fedora?

Filed under
Red Hat

Pravin Satpute started using Linux in 2004 when he was working with Dr. Nagarjuna Gadiraju of the Free Software Foundation of India. He was working on a project to develop libre fonts for Indian languages. At that time, he was using Knoppix with the KDE desktop. In 2006, he became interested in Fedora and starting using Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) in 2007 when he was given a laptop with RHEL 5. Quickly after receiving the laptop, he switched to Fedora 8. His childhood heroes were Steve Jobs, Ratan Tata and Sachin Tendulkar. His favorite movies are Inception and The Mummy.

Read more

QNAP and Canonical Optimize Ubuntu For IoT Purposes

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Internet Of Things movement has attracted a lot of attention in recent years. Not just enthusiasts, but also major firms in the technology sector are working on developing new IoT initiatives. A Partnership between QNAP and Canonical will help optimize Ubuntu on NAS systems for Internet of Things applications.

Read more

Mozilla turns Firefox OS into IoT hub

Filed under
OS
Moz/FF

As an operating system, Firefox OS has undergone a massive transformation in the past 24 months – it’s far more than just a web browser nowadays. But now Mozilla is looking to take Firefox to the next level by using it as a hub for a plethora of Internet of Things projects.

Mozilla is currently working on four IoT projects behind the scenes: Project Smart Home, Project Link, Project Sensor Web and Vaani. Each of the projects will deal with IoT technology in different ways, but all are aimed at making the end consumer’s home and devices smarter. In a blog post, Mozilla’s SVP of Connected Devices, Ari Jaaksi, posted: “Everything is connected around us. This revolution has already started and it will be bigger than previous technology revolutions, including the mobile smartphone revolution. Internet of Things, as many call it today, will fundamentally affect all of us.”

Read more

Kicking the Tires on Arch Based Antergos

Filed under
Reviews

We decided to take the Arch Linux based distribution Antergos out for a test drive. Here’s how it handled, out in traffic and on the track.

A few months back, a fellow tech writer mentioned in an email exchange that I might try using the Arch Linux based Antergos distro as a way to grab the latest and greatest versions of popular software titles for review. Mainly because of Arch’s community repositories, in which users suggest and vote on packages to be included, many popular software titles are available within days after a new release. And since Antergos is a simple install compared to Arch, it would be easy to quickly throw up an installation on a test machine just to look at the latest and greatest from LibreOffice, GIMP and the like.

Read more

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • 6 Excellent Console Linux File Managers
    A console application is computer software which can be used with a text-only computer interface, the command line interface, or a text-based interface included within a graphical user interface operating system, such as a terminal emulator (such as GNOME Terminal or the aforementioned Terminator). Whereas a graphical user interface application generally involves using the mouse and keyboard (or touch control), with a console application the primary (and often only) input method is the keyboard. Many console applications are command line tools, but there is a wealth of software that has a text-based user interface making use of ncurses, a library which allow programmers to write text-based user interfaces.
  • PHP Tour 2016 Clermont-Ferrand
  • Enlightenment's EFL Getting New DRM Library
    Chris Michael of Samsung has been working on a new DRM library for the Enlightenment Foundation Libraries (EFL) with a number of improvements. The initial implementation of this new library, Ecore_Drm2, has been added to EFL Git.
  • Antergos 2016.05.28 Screenshot Tour
  • Gentoo Linux 20160514 Screenshot Tour
  • First coding week with openSUSE, Google Summer of Code
    Embedded below is the blog of Google Summer of Code student Martin Garcia Monterde. Martin detailed his first week coding with openSUSE and the Google Summer of Code.
  • OpenPHT 1.5.2 for Debian/sid
    I have updated the openpht repository with builds of OpenPHT 1.5.2 for Debian/sid for both amd64 and i386 architecture. For those who have forgotten it, OpenPHT is the open source fork of Plex Home Theater that is used on RasPlex, see my last post concerning OpenPHT for details.
  • vcswatch is now looking for tags
    About a week ago, I extended vcswatch to also look at tags in git repositories. Previously, it was solely paying attention to the version number in the top paragraph in debian/changelog, and would alert if that version didn't match the package version in Debian unstable or experimental. The idea is that "UNRELEASED" versions will keep nagging the maintainer (via DDPO) not to forget that some day this package needs an upload. This works for git, svn, bzr, hg, cvs, mtn, and darcs repositories (in decreasing order of actual usage numbers in Debian. I had actually tried to add arch support as well, but that VCS is so weird that it wasn't worth the trouble).

Google and Oracle

Leftovers: OSS

Security Leftovers (Parrot Security OS 3.0 “Lithium”, Regulation)

  • Parrot Security OS 3.0 “Lithium” — Best Kali Linux Alternative Coming With New Features
    The Release Candidate of Parrot Security OS 3.0 ‘Lithium’ is now available for download. The much-anticipated final release will come in six different editions with the addition of Libre, LXDE, and Studio editions. The version 3.0 of this Kali Linux alternative is based on Debian Jessie and powered by custom hardened Linux 4.5 kernel.
  • Regulation can fix security, except you can't regulate security
    Every time I start a discussion about how we can solve some of our security problems it seems like the topics of professional organizations and regulation are where things end up. I think regulations and professional organizations can fix a lot of problems in an industry, I'm not sure they work for security. First let's talk about why regulation usually works, then, why it won't work for security.