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Tails 4.0 is out

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security
Debian

We are especially proud to present you Tails 4.0, the first version of Tails based on Debian 10 (Buster). It brings new versions of most of the software included in Tails and some important usability and performance improvements. Tails 4.0 introduces more changes than any other version since years.

Read more

Early coverage:

  • Tails 4.0

    Tails (The Amnesic Incognito Live System) is, as the spelled out name implies, a privacy focused distribution, designed to run from removable media. Version 4.0 has been released.

  • Tails 4.0 Anonymous Linux OS Released, Based on Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster"

    The Tails project released today the final version of the Tails 4.0 operating system, a major release that introduces numerous enhancements and updated components.

    Based on the Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" operating system, Tails 4.0 is here with up-to-date components to keep your online identity hidden from potential attackers. These include the latest Tor Browser 9.0 anonymous web browser, Tor 0.4.1.6 anonymous network client and server, OnionShare 1.3.2 anonymous file sharing tool, MAT 0.9.0 metadata removal tool, and KeePassXC password manager.

    Tails 4.0 is also powered by the latest Linux 5.3 kernel series, shipping with Linux kernel 5.3.2 in the live ISO image, which brings better support for newer hardware and many other improvements. On top of that, Tails 4.0 ships with GnuPG 2.2.12, Enigmail 2.0.12, Electrum 3.3.8, Git 2.20.1, LibreOffice 6.1.5, Inkscape 0.92.4, GIMP 2.10.8, and Audacity 2.2.2.

Games: AI War 2, Children's Commissioner, Dead End Job, The Long Dark

Filed under
Gaming
  • Space grand strategy game AI War 2 has now officially launched

    Arcen Games have released a new deadly AI into space with the grand strategy game AI War 2 now available as it has left Early Access. This comes ten years to the date since the original launched as well.

    This is the 11th title from Arcen Games to support Linux after AI War: Fleet Command, Tidalis, A Valley Without Wind, A Valley Without Wind 2, Shattered Haven, Skyward Collapse, Bionic Dues, The Last Federation, Starward Rogue, In Case of Emergency, Release Raptor and now AI War 2. You've got to hand it to Arcen, they treat Linux well as a platform for gamers.

  • The Children's Commissioner in England has called on the government to class loot boxes as gambling

    Here could be the start of another nail in the coffin for loot boxes, as the Children's Commissioner in England has put out a new report after a little study was done.

    Never heard of the Children's Commissioner? It's a public independent body in England that is responsible for promoting and protecting the rights of children (read more here). The current head is Anne Longfield, who today released a pretty damning report on the state of how certain games and companies really attempt to suck money out of people at every opportunity.

    I won't quote all of it to spare you some of the things we all already know but it's good to see such a thing being done over here. It's needed, it has been for a long time now. This particular study had them speak to children between 10 to 16 about their gaming habits, what they liked and disliked and so on. Games included that were talked about include Fortnite, Call of Duty, FIFA, Roblox and more which do have some pretty aggressive advertising of the in-game items and subscriptions.

  • Dead End Job, a twin-stick ghost-sucking shooter releases December 13

    Ant Workshop and publisher Headup have announced the madcap mash-up of Ren & Stimpy meets Ghostbusters, Dead End Job, is releasing on December 13. If you love 90's cartoons (who doesn't?) and ghost hunting adventures then you're probably going to enjoy Dead End Job.

    Interestingly, Ant Workshop was founded by Tony Gowland, who previously worked for Rockstar Games and their first game as an indie was Binaries released back in 2016 with Linux support arriving a little later. On top of that, they're getting the music in the game produced by the award winning Wil Morton of Solid Audioworks, who also worked for Rockstar Games.

  • Chilly survival game The Long Dark has released Episode 3, Survival Mode update due December

    Today, you can venture back into the frozen wastes of The Long Dark, as Episode Three CROSSROADS ELEGY is now out. You can skip right ahead to it too.

    With the first two episodes following Mackenzie, this new episode instead follows Astrid after she and Mackenzie get separated in Milton at the opening of Episode One. Due to that, Hinterland Studio said they've just unlocked the first three episodes for anyone to jump in where the want. They said there "may be some minor spoilers for the earlier episodes, but in general we think this flow can work" and while they still recommend playing from the first episode you now have a choice.

PocketBeagle Single Board Review

Filed under
Hardware
Reviews

The PocketBeagle is a single board PC which is different from other single board systems. Most other single board systems are based off the ARM Application (A series) chips. The Pocket Beagle has a Cortex-A8 CPU as well as an M series or Micro-controller. The Micro-controller is a Cortex-M3 processor.

The PocketBeagle board can be used as a controller for projects in which you may need it. Some projects I have seen online include Remote Control (RC) devices, gaming systems, etc.

The Beagle Board website (BeagleBoard.org) has image downloads (http://beagleboard.org/latest-images) for the PocketBeagle which includes Debian 9.5. I will show you how to update this to Debian 10 which was released July 6, 2019. Now, let’s cover the PocketBeagle hardware.

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Ubuntu: 20 Things To Do After Installing Ubuntu 19.10, New Patches, and Extended Security Maintenance (ESM)

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • 20 Things To Do After Installing Ubuntu 19.10 ‘Eoan Ermine’

    Ubuntu 19.10 with codename Eoan Ermine is now here and available for install. For those of you who are eager to check the latest Ubuntu version and for all newcomers to the Linux family, we have prepared few tips to help you get started with Ubuntu 19.10 and get what you may need to complete the setup of your desktop/laptop distro.

  • Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) Gets First Linux Kernel Security Patch, Update Now

    Canonical's recently released Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) operating system has received today its first Linux kernel security patch to address an important security vulnerability.

    Released last week on October 17th, Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) brought numerous new features and improvements, including experimental ZFS on root support in the installer, LZ4 initramfs compression for all architectures, up-to-date toolchain, and embedded Nvidia graphics drivers. It also ships with the latest Linux 5.3 kernel series.

  • How Ubuntu Advantage delivers top-notch Linux security

    Every two years in April, a Long Term Support (LTS) release is published. Ubuntu LTS releases are commonly used in enterprise environments, with more than 60% of large-scale production clouds running Ubuntu LTS images.

    Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) is the latest Ubuntu LTS release, with Ubuntu 20.04 LTS coming in April 2020. Each new LTS release is supported for ten years total; five years of standard support, and five additional years of support under Ubuntu Advantage for Infrastructure (UA-I). UA-I provides users and organisations access to key security fixes and patches, including Canonical’s Extended Security Maintenance (ESM) and Kernel Livepatch services.

    Twice every year, in April and October, interim releases are published. They are commonly used by those interested in the latest features and capable of upgrading more frequently.

    Our latest interim release, which arrived last week, is Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine). It enhanced capabilities include the latest OpenStack Train release for live-migration assistance, improved security for Kubernetes deployments at the edge and significant updates to desktop performance. Standard support for an interim release is provided for nine months with no additional support extension offered.

Intel Core i7-1065G7 Ice Lake Linux Performance Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Recently I picked up a Dell XPS 7390 Core i7 Ice Lake laptop for finally testing this Intel 10nm+ processor under Linux. I have delivered some results so far like the Windows vs. Linux OpenGL/Vulkan performance and the Spectre impact with Ice Lake while this article is the first of several really drilling down on the CPU performance. In this article are benchmarks showing how the Core i7-1065G7 compares in raw performance and performance-per-Watt to the earlier Core i7-8565U (Whiskey Lake) and Core i7-8550U (Kabylake-R) processors.

The Dell XPS 7390 / Core i7-1065G7 continues working out well under Linux as noted in the earlier article with just the potential caveats of needing to switch the storage setting in the firmware over to AHCI mode and on some distributions needing to boot with the intel_lpss_pci driver black-listed. There is also the caveat of Ice Lake Thunderbolt support not in the mainline kernel until Linux 5.4, but at least for Ubuntu 19.10 Canonical has ended up back-porting it to Linux 5.3, but I haven't seen any other major distributions do the same yet. But besides those few blemishes on modern Linux distributions you should be in good shape for the new Dell XPS / Ice Lake.

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Regolith Linux Adds Support for Ubuntu 19.10

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

We wrote about Regolith Linux (a distro) and the Regolith desktop (a DE) earlier in the year — and the topic proved incredibly popular with many readers.

So I’m pleased to hear that the Regolith experience is now available on Ubuntu 19.10, aka the latest version of Ubuntu.

While I recommend read our earlier post out for a comprehensive look at what Regolith is, what it offers, and why it’s (imo) pretty cool, I’ll recap the essentials:

Regolith Linux is lightweight Linux distribution based on Ubuntu 19.04 that uses the Regolith desktop by default.

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Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Focal Fossa) Daily Build ISOs Are Now Available to Download

Filed under
Ubuntu

Unveiled last week as the "Focal Fossa" release, the Ubuntu 20.04 LTS operating system will hit the streets next year on April 23rd, as the 8th long-term support version of Ubuntu Linux, one of the most popular Linux-based operating systems in the world.

While its development cycle will kick off officially later this week on October 24th, with the toolchain upload, the first daily build ISO images are now already available to download for those who want to test it and report bugs, as well as anyone else who just wants an early taste of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS.

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Intel adds 10nm Ice Lake desktop and server CPUs to Linux kernel

Filed under
Linux

The fact that Intel’s Kan Liang has signed off on the addition of Ice Lake desktop and server parts to the Linux kernel does lend a little more credence to Intel’s assertion last week that, despite rumours to the contrary, it would definitely be shipping 10nm desktop processors.

Now it looks like those 10nm CPUs might actually come from the Ice Lake family after all. With Intel Comet Lake, its 10-core big-boy, and Hyper-Threading throughout the range, popping up either late this year or early next we had assumed Intel wasn’t going to follow up the mobile release of Ice Lake with any desktop parts.

Read more

Programming: Picolibc, NGT, Tryton, OCaml, GNOME and KDE

Filed under
Development
  • Picolibc Updates (October 2019)

    Tiny stdio in picolibc uses a global variable, __iob, to hold pointers to FILE structs for stdin, stdout, and stderr. For this to point at actual usable functions, applications normally need to create and initialize this themselves.

    If all you want to do is make sure the tool chain can compile and link a simple program (as is often required for build configuration tools like autotools), then having a simple 'hello world' program actually build successfully can be really useful.

    I added the 'dummyiob.c' module to picolibc which has an iob variable initialized with suitable functions. If your application doesn't define it's own iob, you'll get this one instead.

  • NGT: A library for high-speed approximate nearest neighbor search

    Different search methods are used for different data types. For example, full-text search is for text data, content-based image retrieval is for images, and relational databases are for data relationships. Deep learning models can easily generate vectors from various kinds of data so that the vector space has embedded relationships among source data. This means that if two source data are similar, the two vectors from the data will be located near each other in the vector space. Therefore, all you have to do is search the vectors instead of the source data.
    Moreover, the vectors not only represent the text and image characteristics of the source data, but they also represent products, human beings, organizations, and so forth. Therefore, you can search for similar documents and images as well as products with similar attributes, human beings with similar skills, clothing with similar features, and so on. For example, Yahoo! Japan provides a similarity-based fashion-item search using NGT.

  • Tryton Spanish Days 2019: In Alicante on the 27th & 28th of November

    The Tryton Foundation is happy to announce the venue and date of the next Tryton Spanish Days.

  • 6 Excellent Free Books to Learn OCaml

    Caml is a general-purpose, powerful, high-level programming language with a large emphasis on speed and efficiency. A dialect of the ML programming language, it supports functional, imperative, and object-oriented programming styles. Caml has been developed and distributed by INRIA, a French research institute, since 1985.

    The OCaml system is the main implementation of the Caml language. It has a very strong type-checking system, offers a powerful module system, automatic memory management, first-class functions, and adds a full-fledged object-oriented layer. OCaml includes a native-code compiler supporting numerous architectures, for high performance; a bytecode compiler, for increased portability; and an interactive loop, for experimentation and rapid development. OCaml’s integrated object system allows object-oriented programming without sacrificing the benefits of functional programming, parametric polymorphism, and type inference. The language is mature, producing efficient code and comes with a large set of general purpose as well as domain-specific libraries.

    OCaml is often used for teaching programming, and by large corporations. OCaml benefits from a whole range of new tools and libraries, including OPAM (package manager), optimizing compilers, and development tools such as TypeRex and Merlin.

    OCaml was written in 1996 by Xavier Leroy, Jérôme Vouillon, Damien Doligez, and Didier Rémy at INRIA in France.

  • Build win32/win64 nightlies using Gitlab CI

    A week ago after getting Dia nightlies published on GNOME’s new Flatpak nightlies infrastructure I was discussing with Zander Brown, the new maintainer of Dia, of the possibility to publish Windows nightlies through Gitlab the same way we do with Flatpak bundles. A few minutes later I was already trying to cargo-cult what Gedit had to build Windows bundles.

    It took me a bit of time to figure out how things work, especially that I wanted to make it easier for you to set up a win32/win64 build for your project without much work and as we already use a CI template for Flatpak builds, I ended up doing something pretty similar, but a bit more complex under the hood.

  • Additions and Corrections

    FreeBSD official ports has KDE Frameworks 5.63, Plasma 5.17 and Applications 19.08.2 so it’s right up-to-date with the main KDE releases and it makes a great development platform.

Graphics: Mesa 19.1.8, dGPU and Intel

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Mesa 19.1.8
    Mesa 19.1.8 is now available.
    
    NOTE: It is anticipated that 19.1.8 will be the final release in the
    19.1 series. Users of 19.1 are encouraged to migrate to the 19.2 series
    in order to obtain future fixes.
    
    Apologies for the big delay in this release; there were several regressions that we
    were investigating, which prevented the pre-release to be on time.
    
    Subject: [ANNOUNCE] mesa 19.1.8
    To: mesa-announce at lists.freedesktop.org
    Cc: mesa-dev at lists.freedesktop.org
    
    Adam Jackson (1):
          docs: Update bug report URLs for the gitlab migration
    
    Alan Coopersmith (5):
          c99_compat.h: Don't try to use 'restrict' in C++ code
          util: Make Solaris implemention of p_atomic_add work with gcc
          util: Workaround lack of flock on Solaris
          meson: recognize "sunos" as the system name for Solaris
          intel/common: include unistd.h for ioctl() prototype on Solaris
    
    Andreas Gottschling (1):
          drisw: Fix shared memory leak on drawable resize
    
    Andres Gomez (3):
          docs: Add the maximum implemented Vulkan API version in 19.1 rel notes
          docs/features: Update VK_KHR_display_swapchain status
          egl: Remove the 565 pbuffer-only EGL config under X11.
    
    Andrii Simiklit (1):
          glsl: disallow incompatible matrices multiplication
    
    Arcady Goldmints-Orlov (1):
          anv: fix descriptor limits on gen8
    
    Bas Nieuwenhuizen (2):
          tu: Set up glsl types.
          radv: Add workaround for hang in The Surge 2.
    
    Danylo Piliaiev (1):
          st/nine: Ignore D3DSIO_RET if it is the last instruction in a shader
    
    Dylan Baker (5):
          meson: fix logic for generating .pc files with old glvnd
          meson: Try finding libxvmcw via pkg-config before using find_library
          meson: Link xvmc with libxv
          meson: gallium media state trackers require libdrm with x11
          meson: Only error building gallium video without libdrm when the platform is drm
    
    Eric Engestrom (4):
          gl: drop incorrect pkg-config file for glvnd
          meson: re-add incorrect pkg-config files with GLVND for backward compatibility
          util/anon_file: add missing #include
          util/anon_file: const string param
    
    Erik Faye-Lund (1):
          glsl: correct bitcast-helpers
    
    Greg V (1):
          util: add anon_file.h for all memfd/temp file usage
    
    Haihao Xiang (1):
          i965: support AYUV/XYUV for external import only
    
    Hal Gentz (1):
          gallium/osmesa: Fix the inability to set no context as current.
    
    Jason Ekstrand (2):
          nir/repair_ssa: Replace the unreachable check with the phi builder
          intel/fs: Fix fs_inst::flags_read for ANY/ALL predicates
    
    Juan A. Suarez Romero (12):
          docs: add sha256 checksums for 19.1.7
          cherry-ignore: add explicit 19.2 only nominations
          cherry-ignore: add explicit 19.3 only nominations
          Revert "Revert "intel/fs: Move the scalar-region conversion to the generator.""
          cherry-ignore: Revert "gallium: remove PIPE_CAP_TEXTURE_SHADOW_MAP"
          bin/get-pick-list.sh: sha1 commits can be smaller than 8 chars
          cherry-ignore: nir/opt_large_constants: Handle store writemasks
          cherry-ignore: util: added missing headers in anon-file
          cherry-ignore: radv: Fix condition for skipping the continue CS.
          cherry-ignore: Revert "radv: disable viewport clamping even if FS doesn't write Z"
          Update version to 19.1.8
          docs: add release notes for 19.1.8
    
    Ken Mays (1):
          haiku: fix Mesa build
    
    Kenneth Graunke (4):
          iris: Initialize ice->state.prim_mode to an invalid value
          intel: Increase Gen11 compute shader scratch IDs to 64.
          iris: Disable CCS_E for 32-bit floating point textures.
          iris: Fix iris_rebind_buffer() for VBOs with non-zero offsets.
    
    Lionel Landwerlin (5):
          anv: gem-stubs: return a valid fd got anv_gem_userptr()
          intel: use proper label for Comet Lake skus
          mesa: don't forget to clear _Layer field on texture unit
          intel: fix subslice computation from topology data
          intel/isl: Set null surface format to R32_UINT
    
    Marek Olšák (1):
          gallium/vl: don't set PIPE_HANDLE_USAGE_EXPLICIT_FLUSH
    
    Matt Turner (1):
          util: Drop preprocessor guards for glibc-2.12
    
    Michel Dänzer (1):
          radeonsi: fix VAAPI segfault due to various bugs
    
    Michel Zou (2):
          scons: add py3 support
          scons: For MinGW use -posix flag.
    
    Paulo Zanoni (1):
          intel/fs: fix SHADER_OPCODE_CLUSTER_BROADCAST for SIMD32
    
    Prodea Alexandru-Liviu (1):
          scons/MSYS2-MinGW-W64: Fix build options defaults
    
    Rhys Perry (2):
          radv: always emit a position export in gs copy shaders
          nir/opt_remove_phis: handle phis with no sources
    
    Samuel Iglesias Gonsálvez (1):
          intel/nir: do not apply the fsin and fcos trig workarounds for consts
    
    Stephen Barber (1):
          nouveau: add idep_nir_headers as dep for libnouveau
    
    Tapani Pälli (3):
          iris: close screen fd on iris_destroy_screen
          egl: check for NULL value like eglGetSyncAttribKHR does
          util: fix os_create_anonymous_file on android
    
    pal1000 (2):
          scons/windows: Support build with LLVM 9.
          scons: Fix MSYS2 Mingw-w64 build.
    
    git tag: mesa-19.1.8
    
  • Mesa 19.1.8 Released To End Out The Series

    More than one month has passed since Mesa 19.1.7 compared to the usual bi-weekly release cadence, but on Monday following the closure of remaining blocker bugs, Mesa 19.1.8 was released that also ends out this release series.

    Mesa 19.1.8 is the last planned release in the 19.1 Q2 series with users now being encouraged to upgrade at least to the stable Mesa 19.2 while Mesa 19.3 should be out around early December.

  • Linux 5.5 To Restore Power-Savings For Hybrid Laptops When Not Using The dGPU

    On recent kernels when using a laptop with hybrid graphics but not running with the discrete GPU graphics enabled, a regression meant the dGPU never got powered off... Fortunately, for Linux 5.5 -- and potentially to be back-ported after that -- is a change to restore that power-savings.

    A change enabling NVIDIA HDA controller support inadvertently left dGPUs powered up when not in use, i.e. where the dGPU is not bound to a driver. When the NVIDIA discrete graphics aren't bound to a driver, the power saving path wasn't being hit where the platform power management could disable power to the GPU.

  • Intel Lands More Graphics Code For Linux 5.5 - Jasper, More Intel Xe Multi-GPU Prepping

    Intel's open-source developers kicked off a new week by sending in their latest vetted changes to DRM-Next ahead of next month's Linux 5.5 kernel cycle.

    They already have sent in a lot of new graphics driver code for Linux 5.5 particularly around Tiger Lake while this week's pull request contains more new hardware enablement. They also anticipate sending in another pull request next week to DRM-Next with any other lingering feature work they are hoping to get into Linux 5.5.

  • Intel's Graphics Compiler For Their NEO Compute Stack Now Supports Jasper Lake

    The team maintaining the LLVM-based Intel Graphics Compiler as part of their "NEO" OpenCL/Compute Stack have rolled out v1.0.2714 that includes initial support for Jasper Lake among other improvements.

    Just in the past week we've begun seeing Linux graphics driver patches around "Jasper Lake" and that initial kernel-side support coming for Linux 5.5. Jasper Lake is the rumored 10nm successor to Gemini Lake for low-power SoCs but not to be confused with Elkhart Lake that is Tremont+Gen11 also for ultra-low-power environments based upon the limited information thus far.

Leftovers: GNOME Lawsuit, Clear Linux, Freespire, OmniOS, Mozilla and Proprietary Traps

Filed under
Misc
  • GNOME sends message to 'patent trolls' and files defence against lawsuit

    The GNOME Foundation has filed a defence against the patent lawsuit it received a month ago, saying it wants to "send a message to all software patent trolls out there".

    The alleged "patent troll" in question, Rothschild Patent Imaging (RPI), sued the GNOME Foundation in September, making claims that the Linux desktop provider had infringed a patent related to the wireless distribution of images.

    In its original legal complaint, RPI said GNOME's Shotwell program infringed upon its patent as the platform wirelessly shared photos to social media, imported camera photos onto Shotwell, and filtered various photographic images by topics such as events or groups.

    In response to the patent lawsuit, the Linux desktop provider has filed three legal defences -- a motion to dismiss the case outright, an answer to the claim, and a counterclaim.

  • Clear Linux Working On A New Software Store, User Bundles Arriving Before End Of Year

    Intel developers are still working on some interesting improvements to Clear Linux itself this quarter on top of keeping up to date with the latest upstream software it packages.

    For those users of this Intel-optimized rolling-release Linux distribution, Q4'2019 is set to bring more improvements to its installer, Python 2 should finally be cleared out, the user bundles / third-party support looks like it will be ready, and they are even working on a new alternative to GNOME Software that will be focused on their bundles packaging architecture.

  • Freespire 5.0 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at Freespire 5.0.

  • OmniOS Community Edition r151030y, r151028ay, r151022dw

    OmniOS Community Edition weekly releases for w/c 21st of October 2019 are now available.

  • OmniOS r151030y Brings Microcode Updates For Intel, Zen Topology Updates For AMD

    OmniOS Community Edition remains one of the few successful Illumos/Solaris operating systems outside Oracle. OmniOS CE r151030y was released today along with other older build updates to address the recent sudo vulnerability.

    Besides correcting the recent sudo security vulnerability, OmniOS r151030y has updated its bundled Intel CPU microcode bundle against a newer Intel snapshot, there are improvements to AMD processor topology detection, improved compatibility with Linux's getsockopt() within LX Zones, and other fixes.

  • Quickly Alter Typography with Firefox Font Editor

    Fonts and typography are at the heart of design on the web. We now have powerful tools to inspect, understand, and design our typography in the browser. For instance, have you ever landed on a web page and wondered what fonts are being used? Then, have you asked yourself where those fonts come from or why a particular font isn’t loading?

    The font editor in Firefox provides answers and insights. You gain the ability to make font changes directly, with a live preview. As for me, I use the editor for understanding variable fonts, how they work, and the options they expose.

  • Nate Weiner, formerly CEO of Pocket, to take expanded role at Mozilla focused on New Markets

    Nate Weiner, founder and CEO of Pocket, has been promoted to SVP of a new product organization, New Markets, at Mozilla. The New Markets organization will be working to expand and scale Mozilla’s product portfolio alongside the Firefox and Emerging Technologies teams. The Pocket and Emerging Markets teams will live within the New Markets organization.

  • Avast's internal network was [cracked] via a compromised VPN profile

    "The user, whose credentials were apparently compromised and associated with the IP, did not have domain admin privileges. However, through a successful privilege escalation, the actor managed to obtain domain admin privileges."

  • Can the Internet of Things Prevent Colony Collapse?

    Nordic software consultant Tieto Oyj has placed sensors in two beehives in Sweden, connecting some 80,000 bees in each to the Internet. The hives send data to the off-site servers where it can be remotely accessed in real time, and soon artificial intelligence algorithms will be used to analyze the information.

  • Apple plans its own Mac processors, report claims

    Apple’s top brass is well aware that dependency for key components on third-party suppliers is a big risk. This is why it likes to have at least two suppliers for most of its components across its chain.

    It is also why the company invests deeply in proprietary technologies.

  • Apple's ARM-based Macs are probably arriving next year

    A shift to custom-based ARM chips, while bad news for Intel, would be hardly surprising. It would see Apple more closely merging its hardware efforts, and would also mean the firm no longer have to deal with issues such as Intel's ongoing processor shortages, which could see new MacBooks make it to market more quickly.

  • Apple’s Smart Glasses Could Make 2020 the Year of AR

    Apple plans other revamps for later next year, too: a Watch with sleep-tracking features and Macs that might run on custom processors, which would likely have greater efficiency and lower battery drain.

Fedora, Red Hat and IBM Leftovers

  • Feora: How to setup an anonymous FTP download server

    Sometimes you may not need to set up a full FTP server with authenticated users with upload and download privileges. If you are simply looking for a quick way to allow users to grab a few files, an anonymous FTP server can fit the bill. This article shows you show to set it up.

  • Kubernetes networking, OpenStack Train, and more industry trends

    As part of my role as a senior product marketing manager at an enterprise software company with an open source development model, I publish a regular update about open source community, market, and industry trends for product marketers, managers, and other influencers. Here are five of my and their favorite articles from that update.

  • How collaboration fueled a development breakthrough at Greenpeace

    We'd managed to launch a prototype of Planet 4, Greenpeace's new, open engagement platform for activists and communities. It's live in more than 38 countries (with many more sites). More than 1.75 million people are using it. We've topped more than 3.1 million pageviews.

    To get here, we spent more than 650 hours in meetings, drank 1,478 litres of coffee, and fixed more than 300 bugs. But it fell short of our vision; it still wasn't the minimum lovable product we wanted and we didn't know how to move it forward.

    We were stuck.

    Planet 4's complexity was daunting. We didn't always have the right people to address the numerous challenges the project raised. We didn't know if we'd ever realize our vision. Yet a commitment to openness had gotten us here, and I knew a commitment to openness would get us through this, too.

  • After Seven Quarters Of Growth, Power Systems Declines

    The tough compares have hit home on IBM’s Power Systems business, but the good news is that this has happened after seven consecutive quarters of growth for the Power-based server business that Big Blue owns lock, stock, and barrel. Even with this decline, which was quite steep because of the triple whammy of tough compares (more on that in a moment), there is still a healthy underlying Power Systems business that is much better off than the last time it was hit by similar declines.

    Let’s take a look at the numbers for IBM’s Power Systems division and then work our way up through its Systems group and to the company at large. According to the presentation put together by IBM’s chief financial officer, Jim Cavanaugh, to go over the numbers for the third quarter of 2019, the Power Systems division had a decline of 27 percent in constant currency (meaning growth in local currencies aggregated across those economies), with as-reported sales also being down 27 percent. In other words, currency had no effect on the overall Power Systems business even if it did impact IBM’s sales, as reported in U.S. dollars, by 1.3 percent in the period ended in September.

  • Red Hat Government Symposium: Transforming culture and creating open innovation powerhouses

    For state, local and federal government agencies, digital transformation means much more than just migrating away from legacy technology systems. It involves inspiring ideas, encouraging communication and collaboration, and empowering government employees to forge their organizations’ innovation pathways. 

    That’s why we are focusing on cultural transformation at our upcoming Red Hat Government Symposium. This year’s one-day event—Open transforms: A future built on open source—will be on Nov. 12, 2019, in Washington, D.C., and will feature a stellar lineup of keynotes and panels, as well as fantastic networking opportunities with industry peers.  

  • Journey to the Future of Money with Red Hat at Money 20/20

    Event season is in full swing for the Red Hat Financial services team, and this time, we are headed to the bright lights of Las Vegas to attend Money 20/20 USA, being held from October 27 - 30th. Red Hat will be attending to sponsor a number of activities and discuss the important role open source technologies play in the future of payments, money and banking activities. 

SUSE Leftovers

Filed under
SUSE
  • Digital Transformation – it’s dead, Jim?

    However, digital transformation is like life – it’s an ongoing process, not something you just do once and then it’s done and dusted. A large part of digital transformation is your cloud strategy, which I wrote about fairly recently. That is also something that isn’t a one-off task, but is instead an evolving, transformational process. It was interesting to see, after speaking to attendees at the Gartner event in Frankfurt, that a number of them still hadn’t defined their cloud strategy outside of “we need to move everything to the cloud for cost savings and agility”, while some hadn’t even begun writing a cloud strategy.
    Looking at a chart showing the trends in Google searches for digital transformation in the US (the global trend is the same) over the past 5 years, you can see that while it trends up and then down fairly regularly, it still continues to grow on the whole. So if it’s been around for a while, why does it continue to grow, and is it still relevant?

  • New Security Tools for Application Delivery

    What if you could shut down cybercriminals’ most frequently used method of attack? At SUSE we’ve recently made a move to help you get closer to that goal.

    As you may know, SUSE recently released new versions of our application delivery solutions, SUSE CaaS Platform 4 and SUSE Cloud Application Platform 1.5. The releases contain a number of important updates and features, but the one most exciting in terms of protecting your organization is the addition of Cilium to SUSE CaaS Platform.

Security: Patches, Nostromo, PureBoot and Microsoft's Latest DRM Lock-down (Locking GNU/Linux Out for 'Security')

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (aspell, graphite-web, imagemagick, mediawiki, milkytracker, nfs-utils, and openjdk-11), Fedora (kernel, kernel-headers, kernel-tools, mediawiki, and radare2), openSUSE (dhcp, libpcap, lighttpd, and tcpdump), Scientific Linux (java-1.8.0-openjdk), Slackware (python), SUSE (bluez, kernel, and python-xdg), and Ubuntu (aspell).

  • Nostromo web servers exposed by resurrected RCE vulnerability

    A security researcher has disclosed the existence of a remote code execution (RCE) vulnerability in the open source Nostromo web server software.

    On Monday, a threat analyst and bounty hunter with the online handle Sudoka published a technical analysis of the bug, tracked as CVE-2019-16278.

    The vulnerability impacts Nostromo, also known as nhttpd, a niche web server used by some in the Unix and open source community but altogether dwarfed in popularity by Apache.

    In a blog post, Sudoka said the vulnerability stems from shortcomings in how the path of URLs are verified. Inadequate URL checks mean that an unauthenticated attackers is able to force a server to point to a shell file, resulting in the potential execution of arbitrary code.

  • PureBoot Best Practices

    Recently we started offering the PureBoot Bundle–PureBoot installed and configured on your laptop at the factory and bundled with a pre-configured Librem Key so you can detect tampering from the moment you unbox your laptop. It’s been great to see so many customers select the PureBoot Bundle and now that PureBoot is on so many more customer laptops, we felt it was a good time to write up a post to describe some best practices when using PureBoot.

    If you are just getting started with PureBoot and want to know the basics, check out our Getting Started Guide for pointers on what to do when you start up your PureBoot Bundle for the first time. In this post I’ll assume you have already gone through the first boot and first reboot of your laptop and have settled into daily use.

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  • Secured-core PCs offer new defense against firmware attacks

                     

                       

    Microsoft, chipmakers, and several PC makers on Monday announced Secured-core PCs, which use hardware-based defense mechanisms to combat firmware-level security attacks.

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  • Microsoft's New Plan to Defend the Code Deep Within PCs

                     

                       

    The idea of secured-core PC is to take firmware out of that equation, eliminating it as a link in the chain that determines what's trustworthy on a system. Instead of relying on firmware, Microsoft has worked with AMD, Intel, and Qualcomm to make new central processing unit chips that can run integrity checks during boot in a controlled, cryptographically verified way. Only the chip manufacturers will hold the encryption keys to broker these checks, and they're burned onto the CPUs during manufacturing rather than interacting with the firmware's amorphous, often unreliable code layer.

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Games: Remote Play Together, OpenRA, The Coma 2, Humble Store and Shiver

Filed under
Gaming
  • Steam 'Remote Play Together' is now in Beta, allowing local multiplayer games over the net

    Today, Valve have released an exciting update to the Steam Beta Client which adds in Remote Play Together, allowing you to play local co-op, local multiplayer and shared/split screen games over the net with your friends.

    From what Valve said, it will allow up to four players "or even more in ideal conditions", meaning if you all have reasonable internet connections you might be able to play with quite a few people.

    Something that has of course been done elsewhere, although the advantage here is no extra payments or software needed as it runs right from the Steam client. It's very simply done too. Just like you would invite friends to join your online game, you invite them to Remote Play Together from the Steam Friends list and if they accept…away you go. Only the host needs to own the game too, making it easy to get going.

  • Another OpenRA preview build is up needing testing, Tiberian Sun support is coming along

    Work continues on the open source game engine OpenRA which allows you to play Command & Conquer, Red Alert and Dune 2000 on Linux and other modern platforms with support for Tiberian Sun progressing well.

    [...]

    One issue they've been dealing with is deployable units in Tiberian Sun, while OpenRA had basic support for the feature due to the Construction Yards in classic C&C it wasn't suitable for Tiberian Sun. Now though? They've overhauled it and expanded it. You can now queue up deploy commands between other orders, deployable units can be ordered to pack up and then move somewhere else as a single action too.

    Additionally, the code for aircraft and helicopter movement has also been given an overhaul to add in many of the extra features and dynamics needed for Banshees, Orcas, and Carryalls. The transport behaviour for the Carryall was also updated, with unit pick-up behaviour closer to the original game and allowing you to queue up multiple transport runs.

  • Devespresso Games join with Headup for Western release of The Coma 2: Vicious Sisters

    The Korean survival horror-adventure The Coma 2: Vicious Sisters from Devespresso Games is now getting a helping hand from publisher Headup for Western audiences.

    Also confirmed through the press emails is that The Coma 2 will be entering Steam Early Access on November 5th, with a full release expected in "Q1 2020".

  • Humble Store is doing a Female Protagonist Sale, plus the upcoming Steam sale dates leaked

    The week has only just begun and there's plenty of sales going on, with even more coming up. Let's have a little look. First up, Humble Store is doing a Female Protagonist Sale celebrating various heroines across multiple genres.

  • Kowai Sugoi Studios close up so they've made their point & click horror 'Shiver' free

    Times are tough for indies, with Kowai Sugoi Studios announcing they're closing up shop and so they've set their point and click horror title Shiver free for everyone.

    Kowai Sugoi Studios said in a blog post on the official site that this month they're shutting down, no reason for it was given but they gave their "sincere appreciation to our friends, family, and fans" for supporting them along the way. Shiver seems to be their only game, released originally back in 2017.

Fedora Community Blog: Where are the team’s newcomers?

Filed under
Red Hat

I was wondering why, in the QA team, there are various newcomers willing to contribute, but so little interaction in the mailing list.

If a person would like to join the QA team, like many other Fedora teams, one of the first things they are supposed to do (at least as a good practice, if not as prescribed by the team SOP) is to send an introductory email to the team’s mailing list.

And it is simple to spot that—after the introduction email and eventually being sponsored into the FAS group—in most cases the newcomers don’t send any other mail in the following times. Why?

I was wondering: is it ever possible that a newcomer is so skilled that he/she doesn’t need to ask any clarification to other team members? Is it possible that the documentation we have on the wiki or on docs.f.o. is sufficient to teach a newcomer all the tasks he/she is supposed to perform? How things work? No doubts? Any specific curiosity? All the processes, all the tasks, are they so clear? Wow… or… there is something strange.

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