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Sunday, 24 Jan 21 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story Diamonds are a girl's best friend srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:45pm
Story AMD not out of the Race yet srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:53pm
Story techiemoe rants: srlinuxx 10/08/2009 - 7:01pm
Story More BS from the Evil One. srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:27pm
Story Doom3 for those with little or no PC! srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 12:49am
Story Linux leaders at open-source summit srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:35pm
Story This months Cosmo srlinuxx 06/02/2005 - 4:03am
Story Mandrake's Clustering Again srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:58pm
Story No Case - No Problem srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 5:35am
Story ATI has released 64-Bit drivers srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:38pm

9to5Linux Weekly Roundup: January 24th, 2021 (1st Anniversary)

Filed under
News

Believe it or not, today is 9to5Linux’s first anniversary! It is on this day (January 24th) that I’ve launched 9to5Linux.com a year ago and it wouldn’t be possible without your support, so THANK YOU for all your feedback and donations (they were put to good use) so far. Here’s to us and to many more happy years together!

This has been another amazing week of Linux news and releases as TUXEDO Computers and System76 announced new Linux laptops, Oracle announced Linux 5.10 LTS support for VirtualBox, Raspberry Pi Foundation announced their own silicon, and the KDE Plasma 5.21 desktop environment entered public beta testing. Check them all out in the weekly roundup below, along with all the latest Linux distro and app releases!

Read more

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • Install Oracle Virtualbox 6.1.18 in Ubuntu 20.04 / CentOS 8 & Fedora

    Virtualbox an open-source application for running operating systems virtually in our base system and this application available for multiple operating systems (ie) Windows, Linux, and macOS.

    It has a large number of features, high performing software used in enterprise-level and licensed under General Public License (GPL). It is developed by a community based on a dedicated company.

    This tutorial will be helpful for beginners to install Oracle VirtualBox 6.1.18 in Ubuntu 20.04, Ubuntu 19.10, CentOS 8 / Redhat 8, and Fedora.

  • How To Install Docker on Linux Mint 20

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Docker on Linux Mint 20. For those of you who didn’t know, Docker is an open-source project that automates the deployment of the application inside the software container. The container allows the developer to package up all project resources such as libraries, dependencies, assets, etc. Docker is written in a Go Programming language and is developed by Dot cloud. It is basically a container engine that uses the Linux Kernel features like namespaces and control groups to create containers on top of an operating system and automates the application deployment on the container.

    This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step by step installation of Docker on a Linux Mint 20 (Ulyana).

  • How to Secure Email Server Against Hacking with VPN (CentOS/RHEL)

    In this tutorial, I’m going to share with you my tips and tricks to secure CentOS/RHEL email servers against hacking with a self-hosted VPN server. Many spammers are trying to hack into other people’s email servers. If successful, they would use the hacked email server to send large volumes of spam or steal valuable data. Why do we use a self-hosted VPN server? Because it allows you to enable whitelisting, so only trusted users connected to the VPN server can access your mail server.

  • Fixed compile of libvdpau-va-gl in OE

    I posted yesterday about the problem in OpenEmbedded when the compile of a package requires execution of a binary:
    https://bkhome.org/news/202101/fixed-compile-of-samba-without-krb5-in-oe.html
    This problem does not occur if the build-architecture and target-architectures are the same. The problem occurs with a cross-compile.
    Today I had the same problem, with package 'libvdpau-va-gl'. I had previously compiled this in OE, but now the build-arch is x86_64 and the target-arch is aarch64.

KDE: Kate and Konsole

Filed under
KDE

     

  • The Kate Text Editor - January 2021

    It not only got some nice visual refresh but a much better fuzzy matching algorithm.

    The fuzzy matching algorithm is on its way to be upstream to KCoreAddons to be used by more parts of the KDE universe.

    Praise to Waqar Ahmed for implementing this and pushing it to upstream. And thanks to Forrest Smith for allowing us to use his matching algorithm under LGPLv2+!

    [...]

    As you can see on our team page a lot of new people helped out in the scope of the last year. I hope to see more people showing up there as new contributors. It is a pleasure that Waqar Ahmed & Jan Paul Batrina now have full KDE developer accounts!

    Especially Waqar came up with a lot of nifty ideas what could be fixed/improved/added and he did already do a lot of work to actually get these things done!

    I actually wanted to write earlier about what cool new stuff is there, but had too much review requests to look after. Great! ;=) No I can read review request instead of light novels in the evening.

  •  

  • Contributing to Konsole

    I never thought I could contribute with Open Source, or even imagined I could change my workspace, in my mind doing it was beyond my programming skills.

    I was a Windows user for a long time, until one day I couldn’t stand anymore how the system was so slow, it was not a top computer, but it was a reasonable one to be that slow.

    So I changed to Debian and used it for a time until change to other distros, but I was amazed how fast it was, of course I couldn’t use all of the same programs I used to work with but I did learn new ones.

GNU: GNU Binutils 2.36, GCC 11, and GTK 4.0

Filed under
GNU
  • GNU Binutils 2.36 Released With Support For Intel AMX, AVX VNNI, Key Locker - Phoronix

    GNU Binutils 2.36 is out today as the latest version of this collection of binary utilities for Linux/open-source systems.

    As usual the x86_64 space for today's Binutils update is fairly eventful around supporting new CPU instructions. There is now support for AVX VNNI, HRESET, UINTR, TDX, AMX and Intel Key Locker instructions. All these additions are fairly notable for new and upcoming CPUs, especially the likes of the Advanced Matrix Extensions (AMX) and AVX (non-AVX-512) VNNI. Intel's open-source developers continue doing a good job on ensuring timely support for new CPU features in the Linux space.

  • gcc 11: libgccjit is no longer 'alpha'
  • GCC's JIT Library Is No Longer Considered "Alpha" Quality - Phoronix

    With the upcoming GCC 11 compiler release the GNU compiler's just-in-time (JIT) library is no longer considered to be of alpha quality.

    Libgccjit is considered production quality with GCC 11. GCC 5 was released nearly six years ago already and with that release came the introduction of this GCC JIT library initially developed by Red Hat's compiler experts. It was initially written as an embed-friendly library, to be used by bytecode interpreters and other potential use-cases with there even having been an experimental Python compiler.

  • GTK4 Toolkit Seeing More Improvements To Its OpenGL Renderer - Phoronix

    While GTK 4.0 has been released, there still is major work to look forward to with future GTK4 releases. One area seeing recent and ongoing improvements is with the toolkit's OpenGL renderer.

    Even though GTK4 has a Vulkan renderer, the OpenGL renderer is still of interest for cross-platform support particularly for macOS where Vulkan doesn't exist unless employing MoltenVK. There is also still legacy and other cases like the Nouveau driver stack where Vulkan isn't available, thus in 2021 working on the OpenGL renderer still pays off.

openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2021/03

Filed under
SUSE

Dear Tumbleweed users and hackers,

Shame on me for giving you the information about the changes in Tumbleweed during this week only now, but at least technically this is still the review of Week 03. Since the last weekly review, there have been 6 snapshots published (0114, 0115, 0118, 0119, 0120, and 0121).

Read more

Intel Has A New Driver For Linux 5.12: Reporting Your Laptop's Hinge/Keyboard Angle

Filed under
Linux

Intel's latest open-source Linux driver contribution is a hinge driver that is set to debut with Linux 5.12.

The "hid-sensor-custom-intel-hinge" driver is for supporting a hinge sensor found in many modern Intel laptops. This sensor is able to calculate the angle of the laptop's hinge, the screen angle, and the keyboard angle relative to the horizon/ground. I hadn't realized this sensor was all that common these days but apparently so and enough interest to Intel that they have now provided a Linux driver for exposing this hinge / keyboard / screen angle data.

Read more

Also: Learn To Get Involved In Linux Kernel Development This Spring

How open source is helping solve the plastic pollution problem

Filed under
OSS

In my work life, I often deal with geospatial data. This data not only carries the customary sorts of attributes we see every day but also geographic attributes, like points, lines, enclosed areas, polygons, and surfaces. This data is typically projected from latitude, longitude, and sea-level-elevation data to other coordinate systems to facilitate analysis and viewing.

One of the things I find odd about dealing with geospatial data is how much it is monetized and bound up in restrictive license agreements. If you search for "geospatial data" using your favorite search engine, you'll probably see several pages of links to organizations that sell data or create and sell geospatial analysis and visualization software, all under restrictive licensing. But if you dig deeper, you'll find some wonderful open data and open source software.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Running MS OFFICE on Linux - Is it enough to justify paying for Wine?
  • FOSS Projects Live Off Community Support

    If there's a project you like you don't just have to be a developer to help support and help that project grow, there are plenty of other ways in which a regular person can help out a FOSS project.

  • Routing and Firewalling VLANS with FreeBSD

    When first experimenting, it is important to start with something simple. It can sometimes be far too easy to model very complex setups and then have to spend a lot of time debugging to understand what is not configured correctly.

    These example networks offer both an introduction on how to set up VNET jails with VLANs and show some of the power of their use. A production network built from this would want to give each jail its own file system, this step was skipped to make it easier to follow along.

    The BSD Router project has an example VLAN and VNET multi-tennant set up on their website that includes multiple different virtual machine frameworks. This example is well worth study and this article has hopefully provided the background to help you understand how this network is set up.

  • [Old] FreeBSD On A Raspberry Pi 4 With 4GB Of RAM

    This is the story of how I managed to get FreeBSD running on a Raspberry Pi 4 with 4GB of RAM, though I think the setup story is pretty similar for those with 2GB and 8GB.1

    I also managed to get Rust built from source, (kind of) which is nice because the default Rust installer doesn’t seem to work for FreeBSD running on a Raspberry Pi.

    If there’s anything awry with these steps, please contact me so I can fix it.

  • GNU Linux – how to mount single disk failed RAID1
  • Sylvain Beucler: Android Emulator Rebuild

    Android Rebuilds provides freely-licensed builds of Android development tools from a Mountain View-based company.

    The Emulator package moved to a separate component and build system.

  • The Surprising Power of Business Experimentation

    We’ve long associated innovation breakthroughs with science and technology coming out of R&D labs, e.g., the transistor, penicillin, DNA sequencing, TCP/IP protocols, and so on. Such major lab-based breakthroughs are at one end of the innovation spectrum. At the other end are market-facing innovations, whose purpose is to create appealing and intuitive user experiences, new business models, and compelling market-based strategies.

    Lab-based innovations were generally born when scientists, mathematicians or engineers developed new theories, technologies, algorithms or programs in an R&D lab. Over time, often years, the innovations found their way to the marketplace. Since technology and markets advanced at a relatively slow pace, there was little pressure to reduce the transition times from lab to market. This was the prevailing innovation model through most of the 20th century.

    It all started to change in the 1980s as the rate and pace of technology advances significantly accelerated. The hand-offs and elapsed times to take an innovation from lab to market were no longer competitive, especially with products based on fast changing digital technologies. Start-up companies significantly shortened the time-to-market for new products and services, putting huge pressure on companies still operating under the old rules.

    These competitive pressures, were further exacerbated by the explosive growth of the Internet in the 1990s, as I personally learned when becoming general manager of the newly established IBM Internet Division in December of 1995. A lot was starting to happen around the Internet, but it was not clear where things were heading, and in particular what the implications would be to the world of business. With the Internet, there was no one technology or product you could work on in the labs that would make you a success in the marketplace. This time around, the strategy itself had to come from the marketplace, not the labs.

  • SeaMonkey on Pi4 no longer freezes

    Ans now SM is behaving nicely, no appreciable freezing. I am testing version 2.6.1, and playing around on youtube.com do get a segmentation fault sometimes. I can live with that, better than freezing. Running SM 2.53.5.1.

    One other thing: The SM cache is in /root/.mozilla, not happy with this, as always trying to reduce writes to the drive. So have changed it to /tmp. SM creates a folder named /tmp/Cache2. In EasyOS, /tmp is a tmpfs, in RAM. The downside of this is the cache will be lost at shutdown. Probably an upside is a possible security benefit.

  • Cameron Kaiser: TenFourFox FPR30 SPR1 available

    With the Quad G5 now back in working order after the Floodgap Power Supply Kablooey of 2020, TenFourFox Feature Parity Release "30.1" (SPR 1) is now available for testing (downloads, hashes, release notes).

New in Linux 5.12

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.12 To Allow Voltage/Temperature Reporting On Some ASRock Motherboards - Phoronix

    Voltage, temperature, and fan speed reporting among desktop motherboards under Linux remains one of the unfortunate areas even in 2021... Many SIO ICs remain publicly undocumented and the Linux driver support is often left up to the community and usually through reverse-engineering. Thus the mainline Linux kernel support is left to suffer especially among newer desktop motherboards.

  • [Older] F2FS With Linux 5.12 To Allow Configuring Compression Level

    While the Flash-Friendly File-System (F2FS) allows selecting between your choice of optional compression algorithms like LZO, LZ4, and Zstd -- plus even specifying specific file extensions to optionally limit the transparent file-system compression to -- it doesn't allow easily specifying a compression level. That is fortunately set to change with the Linux 5.12 kernel this spring.

    Queued now into the F2FS "dev" tree ahead of the Linux 5.12 merge window is a patch that's been floating around for some weeks to allow easily configuring the compression level. The compress_algorithm mount option is expanded to allow also specifying a level, such that the format supported is [algorithm]:[level] should you want to override any level preference like with the LZ4 and Zstd compression algorithms.

Security and Proprietary Software

Filed under
Security
  • diffoscope 165 released

    The diffoscope maintainers are pleased to announce the release of diffoscope version 165. This version includes the following changes:

    [ Dimitrios Apostolou ]
    * Introduce the --no-acl and --no-xattr arguments [later collapsed to
      --extended-filesystem-attributes] to improve performance.
    * Avoid calling the external stat command.
    
    [ Chris Lamb ]
    * Collapse --acl and --xattr into --extended-filesystem-attributes to cover
      all of these extended attributes, defaulting the new option to false (ie.
      to not check these very expensive external calls).
    
    [ Mattia Rizzolo ]
    * Override several lintian warnings regarding prebuilt binaries in the
    * source.
    * Add a pytest.ini file to explicitly use Junit's xunit2 format.
    * Ignore the Python DeprecationWarning message regarding the `imp` module
      deprecation as it comes from a third-party library.
    * debian/rules: filter the content of the d/*.substvars files

  • SonicWall hardware VPNs hit by worst-case 0-zero-day-exploit attacks

    “…have information about hacking of a well-known firewall vendor and other security products by this they are silent and do not release press releases for their clients who are under attack due to several 0 days in particular very large companies are vulnerable technology companies,” BleepingComputer was told via email.

  • Cyber Firm SonicWall Says It Was Victim of ‘Sophisticated’ Hack

    The Silicon Valley-based company said in a statement that the two products compromised provide users with remote access to internal resources.

    The attackers exploited so-called “zero days” -- a newly discovered software flaw -- on certain SonicWall remote access products, the company said in a statement.

  • Former manager of Microsoft Taiwan investigated for fraud

    A former manager at the Taiwanese branch of software giant Microsoft was questioned Friday (Jan. 22) about an alleged fraud scam directed against the company.

    In 2016 and 2017, Chang Ming-fang (張銘芳) allegedly colluded with managers of other companies to forge orders to obtain discounts and products at lower prices, UDN reported.

  • School laptops sent by government arrive loaded with malware [iophk: Windows TCO]

    A number of the devices were found to be infected with a "self-propagating network worm", according to the forum, and they also appeared to be contacting Russian servers, one teacher wrote. The Windows-based laptops were specifically infected with Gamarue.1, a worm Microsoft identified in 2012.

  • Ransomware provides the perfect cover

    Look at any list of security challenges that CISOs are most concerned about and you’ll consistently find ransomware on them. It’s no wonder: ransomware attacks cripple organizations due to the costs of downtime, recovery, regulatory penalties, and lost revenue. Unfortunately, cybercriminals have added an extra sting to these attacks: they are using ransomware as a smokescreen to divert security teams from other clandestine activities behind the scenes.

    Attackers are using the noise of ransomware to their advantage as it provides the perfect cover to distract attention so they can take aim at their real target: exfiltrating IP [sic], research, and other valuable data from the corporate network.

  • Global ransom DDoS extortionists are retargeting companies

    According to Radware, companies that received this letter also received threats in August and September 2020. Security researchers’ analysis of this new wave of ransom letters suggested that the same threat actors from the middle of 2020 are behind these malicious communications.

    When the DDoS extortion campaign started in August of 2020, a single Bitcoin was worth approximately $10,000. It’s now worth roughly $30,000. The attackers cited this in the latest round of ransom letters, and it represents the impact the rising price of Bitcoin is having on the threat landscape.

    A few hours after receiving the message, organizations were hit by DDoS attacks that exceeded 200 Gbps and lasted over nine hours without slowdown or interruption. A maximum attack size of 237 Gbps was reached with a total duration of nearly 10 hours, the alert warned.

  • Boeing 737 MAX is a reminder of the REAL problem with software | Stop at Zona-M

    And that problem almost never is software.

7 Linux Distros to Look Forward in 2021

Filed under
Linux

Here is a list of most anticipated Linux distributions you should keep an eye on in the year 2021.
Read more

Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming
  • Gaming Like It's 1925: Last Week To Join The Public Domain Game Jam!

    Sign up for the Public Domain Game Jam on itch.io »

  • ujoy(4) added to -current

    With the following commit, Thomas Frohwein (thfr@) added a joystick/gamecontroller driver to -current: [...]

  • The First Online Conference Is Happening Today For The Godot Game Engine - Phoronix

    For those interested in Godot as the premiere open-source 2D/3D game engine or just looking for some interesting technical talks to enjoy this weekend, the first GodotCon Online is today.

    GodotCon 2021 is the open-source game engine's first entirely online conference for developers, users, and other contributors to this promising open-source project. The YouTube-based event has been running from 8:45 UTC today until 16:00 UTC, but fear not if you missed out as you can already go back and listen to the prior talks in the stream. The recordings will remain available for those wanting to enjoy it in the days ahead. All of the content is free of charge.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • How to test PHP code using PHPUnit - Anto ./ Online

    PHPUnit automatically executable tests that verify your application’s behavior. Thus – you can ensure that your changes don’t break existing functionality. This post will show you how to test your PHP code using PHPUnit.

  • Latency Numbers Every Team Should Know

    We design systems around the size of delays that are expected. You may have seen the popular table “latency numbers every programmer should know” which lists some delays that are significant in technology systems we build.

    Teams are systems too. Delays in operations that teams need to perform regularly are significant to their effectiveness. We should know what they are.

    Ssh to a server on the other side of the world and you will feel frustration; delay in the feedback loop from keypress to that character displayed on the screen.

    Here’s some important feedback loops for a team, with feasible delays. I’d consider these delays tolerable by a team doing their best work (in contexts I’ve worked in). Some teams can do better, lots do worse.

    [...]

    In recent times you may have experienced the challenge of having conversations over video links with significant delays. This is even harder when the delay is variable. It’s hard to avoid talking over each other.

    Similarly, it’s pretty bad if we know it’s going to take all day to deploy a change to production. But it’s so worse if we think we can do it in 10 minutes, when it actually ends up taking all day. Flaky deployment checks, environment problems, change conflicts create unpredictable delays.

    It’s hard to get anything done when we don’t know what to expect. Like trying to hold a video conversation with someone on a train that’s passing through the occasional tunnel.

  • How I programmed a virtual gift exchange

    Every year, my wife's book club has a book exchange during the holidays. Due to the need to maintain physical distance in 2020, I created an online gift exchange for them to use during a book club videoconference. Apparently, the virtual book exchange worked out (at least, I received kind compliments from the book club members), so I decided to share this simple little hack.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: prrd 0.0.4: More tweaks

    The key idea of prrd is simple, and described in some more detail on its webpage and its GitHub repo. Reverse dependency checks are an important part of package development that is easily done in a (serial) loop. But these checks are also generally embarassingly parallel as there is no or little interdependency between them (besides maybe shared build depedencies). See the (dated) screenshot (running six parallel workers, arranged in split byobu session).

    This release brings several smaller tweaks and improvements to the summary report that had accumulated in my use since the last release last April. We also updated the CI runners as one does these days.

  • vrurg: A New Release Of Cro::RPC::JSON

    I don’t usually announce regular releases of my modules. But not this time. I start this new year with the new v0.1 branch of Cro::RPC::JSON. Version 0.1.1 is currently available on CPAN (will likely be replaced with fez as soon as it is ready). The release is a result of so extensive changes in the module that I had to bump its :api version to 2.

  • gfldex: Anonymous slurpers

    I have a script where I’m only interested in the last two lines of its output.

Nouveau X.Org Driver Sees First Release In Two Years

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Two years and nine patches later, xf86-video-nouveau 1.0.17 is out as the latest X.Org driver update for this open-source NVIDIA driver component.

Like the other DDX drivers with the exception of the generic xf86-video-modesetting driver that is quite common now to those still running on X.Org with the open-source stack, xf86-video-nouveau seldom sees new activity. Since the prior v1.0.16 release two years ago there has been less than a dozen patches for it. The interesting activity happens in DRM/KMS kernel space and an increasing number of users are just relying upon xf86-video-modesetting over these hardware-specific X.Org user-space drivers.

Read more

KDE Goals – a year lost, a year gained

Filed under
KDE

The year 2020 was difficult in many ways, but it also was important for me: I joined KDE e.V. as a consultant in the role of Project Coordinator.

One of the main focuses of mine was supporting the KDE Goals initiative, which resulted in creating a formalized process.

As you might know (or read in the process), the KDE Goals are to be replaced roughly every two years.

This timebox was selected to balance keeping the Goals fresh, and letting the Goal Champions have enough time to work on the topics with the community.

Read more

Also: GNOME 40's Mutter Adds Atomic Mode-Setting Support

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to create a Linux EC2 instance step by step on Amazon AWS

    Amazon EC2 (Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud) is a part of AWS product offerings, where users can rent virtual servers in the AWS public cloud. You pay for rented compute resources (CPU, memory, hard drive) at per-second granularity on a "pay-as-you-go" basis. For those of you who have just started with Amazon EC2, this tutorial covers a step-by-step procedure to create a Linux instance on AWS EC2 platform.

  • What’s with cp --reflink: failed to clone: Invalid argument?

    Most modern copy-on-write file systems, such as Btrfs and XFS, support file cloning. (OpenZFS being the notable exception.) However, the tools that support this space-saving innovation can be difficult to use. Here’s an example situation detailing how the simple copy (cp) command on Linux can make it hard to understand what’s going on.

    As an example, here’s a quick command set that will create a file and a directory, disable copy-on-write on the directory, and then attempt to clone the file into the directory. It uses commands from gnu-coreutils and e2fsprogs packages, and assumes you’re working on a file cloning-capable file system.

  • Set Up SSH Two-Factor Authentication (2FA) on CentOS/RHEL Server

    This tutorial will show you how to set up SSH two-factor authentication on CentOS/RHEL server using the well-known Google Authenticator. It will greatly improve the security of SSH service on your CentOS/RHEL server.

  • How to Install PHP 8.0 & PECL Extensions in Ubuntu 20.04, 18.04, 16.04 | UbuntuHandbook

    Want to install PHP 8.0 as well as many PECL extensions in your Ubuntu Server? Well there’s a well trusted PPA that contains the packages for all current Ubuntu releases.

    Ondřej Surý, a Debian Developer who maintains the official PHP packages in Debian, is maintaining an Ubuntu PPA that contains the latest PHP 5.6, PHP 7.0, PHP 7.1, PHP 7.2, PHP 7.3, PHP 7.4, and PHP 8.0 packages as well as PECL extensions for all current Ubuntu releases.

  • Install and Configure Prometheus Monitoring on Kubernetes

    We are going to deploy Prometheus to monitor Kubernetes nodes and more.

  • Command to install Vmware tools on Ubuntu using terminal

    Vmware workstation Player is one of the best available virtualization platforms to run various Linux, Android, and Windows virtual machines. However, to adapt the host display and increase the performance of installed guest os or VMs it needs a set of tools called VMware Tools to install on Linux, Windows, and other supported OS.

    VMware tools let us enable guests to host or vice versa content copy-paste (clipboard), drag and drop facility to transfer folders and files, and let the guest os to adapt the resolution of the host display.

    Although we can install VMware Tools using the graphical options of VMware workstation player, however, on Linux this becomes a lot easier and straightforward with the help of a command-line terminal.

GhostBSD 21.01.20 release note

Filed under
BSD

This new release is to fix a bug found in the installer related to the hostname not behind set up properly on the new system installation. I am sorry if some of you had a problem cause I the missing hostname.

[...]

Recommended system requirements for the new iso

- 64-bit processor
- 4GB+ of RAM
- 15 GB of free hard drive space
- Network card

Read more

MX Linux is Now Available for Raspberry Pi [Download and Install Guide]

Filed under
Linux
News

The lightweight and popular Linux distribution - MX Linux extended its reach. And MX Linux is now available for Raspberry Pi devices as a Beta image (Fluxbox-RaspberryPi Respin “Ragout” ) which you can try out on your devices right now. Here's how.
Read more

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More in Tux Machines

GNU: GNU Binutils 2.36, GCC 11, and GTK 4.0

  • GNU Binutils 2.36 Released With Support For Intel AMX, AVX VNNI, Key Locker - Phoronix

    GNU Binutils 2.36 is out today as the latest version of this collection of binary utilities for Linux/open-source systems. As usual the x86_64 space for today's Binutils update is fairly eventful around supporting new CPU instructions. There is now support for AVX VNNI, HRESET, UINTR, TDX, AMX and Intel Key Locker instructions. All these additions are fairly notable for new and upcoming CPUs, especially the likes of the Advanced Matrix Extensions (AMX) and AVX (non-AVX-512) VNNI. Intel's open-source developers continue doing a good job on ensuring timely support for new CPU features in the Linux space.

  • gcc 11: libgccjit is no longer 'alpha'
  • GCC's JIT Library Is No Longer Considered "Alpha" Quality - Phoronix

    With the upcoming GCC 11 compiler release the GNU compiler's just-in-time (JIT) library is no longer considered to be of alpha quality. Libgccjit is considered production quality with GCC 11. GCC 5 was released nearly six years ago already and with that release came the introduction of this GCC JIT library initially developed by Red Hat's compiler experts. It was initially written as an embed-friendly library, to be used by bytecode interpreters and other potential use-cases with there even having been an experimental Python compiler.

  • GTK4 Toolkit Seeing More Improvements To Its OpenGL Renderer - Phoronix

    While GTK 4.0 has been released, there still is major work to look forward to with future GTK4 releases. One area seeing recent and ongoing improvements is with the toolkit's OpenGL renderer. Even though GTK4 has a Vulkan renderer, the OpenGL renderer is still of interest for cross-platform support particularly for macOS where Vulkan doesn't exist unless employing MoltenVK. There is also still legacy and other cases like the Nouveau driver stack where Vulkan isn't available, thus in 2021 working on the OpenGL renderer still pays off.

openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2021/03

Dear Tumbleweed users and hackers, Shame on me for giving you the information about the changes in Tumbleweed during this week only now, but at least technically this is still the review of Week 03. Since the last weekly review, there have been 6 snapshots published (0114, 0115, 0118, 0119, 0120, and 0121). Read more

Intel Has A New Driver For Linux 5.12: Reporting Your Laptop's Hinge/Keyboard Angle

Intel's latest open-source Linux driver contribution is a hinge driver that is set to debut with Linux 5.12. The "hid-sensor-custom-intel-hinge" driver is for supporting a hinge sensor found in many modern Intel laptops. This sensor is able to calculate the angle of the laptop's hinge, the screen angle, and the keyboard angle relative to the horizon/ground. I hadn't realized this sensor was all that common these days but apparently so and enough interest to Intel that they have now provided a Linux driver for exposing this hinge / keyboard / screen angle data. Read more Also: Learn To Get Involved In Linux Kernel Development This Spring

Android Leftovers