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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 21 Jul 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story Wolvix 2 - Hungry like the wolf srlinuxx 3 30/03/2009 - 4:07pm
Story 100% cure for Conficker srlinuxx 3 31/03/2009 - 1:07pm
Story Ballmer apologises for Windows srlinuxx 3 01/04/2009 - 12:31am
Story iFolder, Great for Fans of Dropbox, Source Code, and Lots of Control srlinuxx 3 06/04/2009 - 6:03pm
Story Linux laptops look to phone stores and Web for distribution srlinuxx 3 06/04/2009 - 11:24pm
Story Xfce 4.6.1 Released srlinuxx 3 20/04/2009 - 11:31am
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 3 02/05/2009 - 1:46am
Story FSF launches new free software activist internship program srlinuxx 3 09/05/2009 - 12:39am
Story the best Linux distro for your netbook srlinuxx 3 10/05/2009 - 9:28pm
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 3 13/05/2009 - 7:20am

Night that the Lights went Out in TN

Filed under
Sci/Tech
-s

We had about an hours down time this morning due to a fight between a 97 Ford Explorer and one of our old power poles. The pole lost. Well, actually you should have seen the other guy too - what a mess. There were splinters and glass everywhere. But our greedy electric company was their usual prompt self and got us back online in record time with little loss of revenue. I apologize for any inconvenience this must have caused. Big Grin Thanks.

Did SCO end up helping Linux?

Filed under
Linux

Here's a real nice article by Stuart Cohen on Businessweek Online exclaiming that SCO's legal maneuvers only made Linux stronger. It states SCO's litigation seemed to bring developers and the community together fighting for the cause. He says "we can thank SCO for helping to move Linux even faster from the fringe of the computer network to the heart of the data center."

Hackers homing in on Cellular Phones

Filed under
Sci/Tech

This story kinda hits home for me as I now work on a computer all day for cingular wireless (formerly AT&T in our branch). I guess this is why call volume has been increasing steadily lately. Here's the full story on Reuter's slow ass site.

Linux Kernel Security is Lacking?

Filed under
Linux

Seems Jason Miller is finding fault in the Linux kernel security bug fix procedure. He goes on and on about security and how security vulnerabilities are handled. Although he mentioned that Gentoo had an accessible security contact, that really didn't apply to things like the underlying kernel. You can read the rest of his article including his thoughts on how to improve the situation here on securityfocus.

ATI has released 64-Bit drivers

Filed under
Software

According to AMDZone and ATI's own site, ATI has released 64-bit drivers for XFree86 and Xorg. Here's a link the download page.

No Case - No Problem

Filed under
Hardware
Humor
-s

Just mount every thing on the wall! LOL Here's the discussion thread with pictures. Too funny.

2004 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Award Winners Announced

Filed under
Linux

Browser of the Year - Firefox (77.12%)

Distribution of the Year - Slackware (19.36%)

LiveCD Distribution of the Year - Knoppix (57.69%)

Database of the Year - MySQL (53.51%)

Desktop Environment of the Year - KDE (58.25%)

I Heard a Rumor - PCLOS 8.1 in the Works?

Filed under
PCLOS
-s

A little birdie told me that an update to the acclaimed PCLinuxOS Preview 8 is in the works and possibly due out next week. Details are a bit sketchy at this time, but it seems Tom has been hard at work updating the hardware detection and mklivecd scripts. Now don't get your hopes up, but I hear it might sport a newer 2.6.10 kernel, including patches to fix a little kvm switch problem. Of course it will include all kinds of application updates and other goodies. More on this as it develops.

Mandrake's Clustering Again

Filed under
MDV

Mandrake is apparently joining a consortium to help the advancement of what I think of as distributed computing to the point of and what they are terming clustering. Mandrake has a some previous experience in that arena so maybe they can prove to be an asset. Here's a more in depth article on the subject. They want to harness our cpu cycles, and it sounds like for commercial purposes. Show me the money then I say. Until then, I'm looking for aliens.

This months Cosmo

Woo hoo Gals, this months Cosmopolitan magazine is chocked full of nice tips and tricks to tantalize even the most frigid of geeks. Big Grin It looks like Ashley Simpson on the cover, but more importantly are the words: The Power of Pre-sex, Beyond Kama Sutra, His Butt, and 50 Ways to Have Fun With Your Man. I can't wait to try some of this stuff on my man!!!

50 gmail invites?

Filed under
Google
Software

Has anyone else noticed they now have 50 gmail invites to get rid of? I couldn't even get rid of the original 5 or 6! Well, here's a summary of this weeks google wars.

Moooore Spam!

Filed under
Security

Spam has new way to evade security

E-mails via service providers clogging system

Yep, just what we need, more spam. Apparently they aren't as concerned with hiding from their isps as getting the mail out as they are now just sending it through their isps servers. Read the gory details here.

Linux leaders at open-source summit

Filed under
OSS

Here's a long borin^H^Hserious story on how Linux was represented at last weeks open-source summit. I didn't read too much of it, but it might interest you hard core advocates.

Vin Diesel going soft on us?

Filed under
Movies
-s

Have you seen the previews for Vin Diesels's new movie? He is starring in a soon to be released Walt Disney production co-starring five children! I hope all those tattoos in XXX were stick ons! Well, here's a summary of the flick and here's a shot of the promotional poster. Heck anything with Vin Diesel has got be good!

Doom3 for those with little or no PC!

Filed under
Gaming
-s

Here's a story on a board game based on and entitled Doom: The Board Game. This is apparently not breaking news, but I just heard about and got a chuckle over it a few days ago. But hey, I think it might make a neato gift for those diehard doom series lovers, or those who wished they could have played doom3 but couldn't swing the hardware upgrade! Get yours here!

More BS from the Evil One.

Filed under
Microsoft

Seems Mr. Gates is at it again with saying one thing while trying to cleverly conceal his jabs at Linux. This time speaking of interoperability amongst differing architectures while stating that doesn't mean open source as open source is detrimental to interoperability. Does that seem backwards to anyone else besides me? This is posted all over the net, but here's one reference at Betanews.

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More in Tux Machines

First Release Candidate of Linux 5.3

  • Linux 5.3-rc1
    It's been two weeks, and the merge window is over, and Linux 5.3-rc1
    is tagged and pushed out.
    
    This is a pretty big release, judging by the commit count. Not the
    biggest ever (that honor still goes to 4.9-rc1, which was
    exceptionally big), and we've had a couple of comparable ones (4.12,
    4.15 and 4.19 were also big merge windows), but it's definitely up
    there.
    
    The merge window also started out pretty painfully, with me hitting a
    couple of bugs in the first couple of days. That's never a good sign,
    since I don't tend to do anything particularly odd, and if I hit bugs
    it means code wasn't tested well enough. In one case it was due to me
    using a simplified configuration that hadn't been tested, and caused
    an odd issue to show up - it happens. But in the other case, it really
    was code that was too recent and too rough and hadn't baked enough.
    The first got fixed, the second just got reverted.
    
    Anyway, despite the rocky start, and the big size, things mostly
    smoothed out towards the end of the merge window. And there's a lot to
    like in 5.3. Too much to do the shortlog with individual commits, of
    course, so appended is the usual "mergelog" of people I merged from
    and a one-liner very high-level "what got merged". For more detail,
    you should go check the git tree.
    
    As always: the people credited below are just the people I pull from,
    there's about 1600 individual developers (for 12500+ non-merge
    commits) in this merge window.
    
    Go test,
    
                Linus
    
  • Linux 5.3-rc1 Debuts As "A Pretty Big Release"

    Just as expected, Linus Torvalds this afternoon issued the first release candidate of the forthcoming Linux 5.3 kernel. It's just not us that have been quite eager for Linux 5.3 and its changes. Torvalds acknowledged in the 5.3-rc1 announcement that this kernel is indeed a big one: "This is a pretty big release, judging by the commit count. Not the biggest ever (that honor still goes to 4.9-rc1, which was exceptionally big), and we've had a couple of comparable ones (4.12, 4.15 and 4.19 were also big merge windows), but it's definitely up there."

  • The New Features & Improvements Of The Linux 5.3 Kernel

    The Linux 5.3 kernel merge window is expected to close today so here is our usual recap of all the changes that made it into the mainline tree over the past two weeks. There is a lot of changes to be excited about from Radeon RX 5700 Navi support to various CPU improvements and ongoing performance work to supporting newer Apple MacBook laptops and Intel Speed Select Technology enablement.

today's howtos and programming bits

  • How to fix Ubuntu live USB not booting
  • How to Create a User Account Without useradd Command in Linux?
  • Container use cases explained in depth
  • Containerization and orchestration concepts explained
  • Set_env.py

    A good practice when writing complicated software is to put in lots of debugging code. This might be extra logging, or special modes that tweak the behavior to be more understandable, or switches to turn off some aspect of your test suite so you can focus on the part you care about at the moment. But how do you control that debugging code? Where are the on/off switches? You don’t want to clutter your real UI with controls. A convenient option is environment variables: you can access them simply in the code, your shell has ways to turn them on and off at a variety of scopes, and they are invisible to your users. Though if they are invisible to your users, they are also invisible to you! How do you remember what exotic options you’ve coded into your program, and how do you easily see what is set, and change what is set?

  • RPushbullet 0.3.2

    A new release 0.3.2 of the RPushbullet package is now on CRAN. RPushbullet is interfacing the neat Pushbullet service for inter-device messaging, communication, and more. It lets you easily send alerts like the one to the left to your browser, phone, tablet, … – or all at once. This is the first new release in almost 2 1/2 years, and it once again benefits greatly from contributed pull requests by Colin (twice !) and Chan-Yub – see below for details.

  • A Makefile for your Go project (2019)

    My most loathed feature of Go was the mandatory use of GOPATH: I do not want to put my own code next to its dependencies. I was not alone and people devised tools or crafted their own Makefile to avoid organizing their code around GOPATH.

  • Writing sustainable Python scripts

    Python is a great language to write a standalone script. Getting to the result can be a matter of a dozen to a few hundred lines of code and, moments later, you can forget about it and focus on your next task. Six months later, a co-worker asks you why the script fails and you don’t have a clue: no documentation, hard-coded parameters, nothing logged during the execution and no sensible tests to figure out what may go wrong. Turning a “quick-and-dirty” Python script into a sustainable version, which will be easy to use, understand and support by your co-workers and your future self, only takes some moderate effort. 

  • Notes to self when using genRSS.py

The Status of Fractional Scaling (HiDPI) Between Windows & Linux

There’s a special type of displays commonly called “HiDPI“, which means that the number of pixels in the screen is doubled (vertically and horizontally), making everything drawn on the screen look sharper and better. One of the most common examples of HiDPI are Apple’s Retina displays, which do come with their desktops and laptops. However, one issue with HiDPI is that the default screen resolutions are too small to be displayed on them, so we need what’s called as “scaling”; Which is simply also doubling the drawn pixels from the OS side so that they can match that of the display. Otherwise, displaying a 400×400 program window on a 3840×2160 display will give a very horrible user experience, so the OS will need to scale that window (and everything) by a factor of 2x, to make it 800×800, which would make it better. Fractional scaling is the process of doing the previous work, but by using fractional scaling numbers (E.g 1.25, 1.4, 1.75.. etc), so that they can be customized better according to the user’s setup and needs. Now where’s the issue, you may ask? Windows operating system has been supporting such kind of displays natively for a very long time, but Linux distributions do lack a lot of things in this field. There are many drawbacks, issues and other things to consider. This article will take you in a tour about that. Read more Also: Vulkan 1.1.116 Published With Subgroup Size Control Extension

Android Leftovers