Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Friday, 16 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Washing the windows myths. Service and support.

Filed under
Microsoft One of the biggest fear factors that companies have with their computing systems is that things can go bang. This prompts the who you gunna call question from higher ups.

Mozilla Unleashes a Rather Disappointing Firefox 3.6.4 RC

Filed under
Moz/FF Version 3.6.4b6 is officially described as the RC preceding the final released and integrates out of process plug-ins as well as OpenGL 2 hardware acceleration for full screen videos, but

A look at how Ubuntu appears to beginners

Filed under
  • A look at Ubuntu--and at how Linux can appear to beginners
  • Lubuntu 10.04 - Distro Review
  • Ubuntu 10.04 (Netbook Edition)

MeeGo OS – A (Faster) Alternative to Windows

Filed under
  • MeeGo OS – A (Faster) Alternative to Windows on Your Netbook
  • The 5-minute guide to MeeGo

some odds & ends:

Filed under
  • New In KDE Partition Manager 1.1 (II): SMART Status Reports
  • Lenovo kills Skylight OS in favor of Android
  • FreeBSD 8.1 Enters Beta; Final Coming In July
  • Zuckerberg Donated to Open Source Facebook Competitor
  • Penguin Computer Spreads Its Wings
  • Pic of the kde e.v. board, may 2010
  • iotop for better disk monitoring
  • Jon maddog Hall: Small and Fast Wins

some howtos:

Filed under
  • Installing applications from the command line in OpenSuSE
  • How to remove / stop Software / mdadm Raid array on Linux
  • 2 Computers via 1 Keyboard & Mouse
  • GRUB - How to install GRUB using grub-install
  • Install Latest OpenShot Video Editor in Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Tip: fix Waiting for sound system to respond problem
  • Example of SSH tunneling
  • make OpenDocument slideshows out of plain text files
  • Fixing HP printer plugin problem in Linux Mint 9 / Ubuntu 10.04
  • Viewing doc, xls and ppt files in Vim
  • Move Gnome Menu/Task Bar to Bottom in Ubuntu, Fedora, openSUSE
  • LXDE (For Ubuntu and Fedora)
  • Customize Linux easily With Airulus
  • Linux WD EARS Advanced Hard Drive Format

openSUSE Weekly News #125 is out

Filed under
  • openSUSE Weekly News #125 is out
  • Weekly Review of PostgreSQL
  • Weekly Kernel Review

Shogo Linux Tablet, a Potential iPad Killer

Filed under
Linux There is a new tablet PC in town that runs Linux, and its name is Shogo. Made by realease, a Hong Kong-based platform provider, this device features a 10-inch capacitive touchscreen and will be available in two models:

Linux Mint 9 LXDE RC released

Filed under
  • Linux Mint 9 LXDE RC released
  • New openSUSE KDE 4.5 Beta 1 snapshot available
  • Fedora 13 Xfce Spin…get it while it’s hot!

Dennis Hopper, creator of hit 'Easy Rider,' dies

Filed under

Dennis Hopper, the high-flying Hollywood wild man whose memorable and erratic career included an early turn in "Rebel Without a Cause," an improbable smash with "Easy Rider" and a classic character role in "Blue Velvet," has died. He was 74.

Firefox 64-bit builds coming for Windows, Linux and Mac OS X

Filed under
Moz/FF It seems Mozilla is getting ready to finally provide 64-bit versions as part of its core set of Firefox releases.

trinity and the challenges of continuing kde 3

Filed under
KDE This morning, while having my usual Cafe Latte (albeit this time in Berlin instead of at home sweet home in Nijmegen), I read about the Trinity project, which is an effort to revive KDE 3.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
  • PowerMizer Is Not Likely The Problem In 256.xx Issue
  • CentOS Goes Commercial
  • CAOS Theory Podcast 2010.05.28
  • Adobe + Linux == Balls
  • Bolzano facing protests over licence deal forced by vendor lock-in
  • Openness, transparency, and community: The future of commenting on the web
  • Administrations in Spain and Portugal heckled over licence violations
  • Novell auction could be patent troll bonanza
  • 3.2.1 RC 2 available
  • Mozilla releases Thunderbird 3.1 RC1
  • FLOSS Weekly 121: Freenode
  • Red Hat: Fedora project has no plans to support Xen again
  • What Makes Android Tick
  • Asa Dotzler celebrates 10 years @ Mozilla
  • Open Your World recap
  • fbterm: Birth of the cool for the console
  • Google's WebM license could undermine the meaning of 'open source'

some howtos:

Filed under
  • Hacking OOo for dummies
  • Variable Interpolation
  • Disk encryption on Fedora 13
  • Performance tuning Linux Kernel with swappiness parameter
  • Disable SELinux on Fedora 13 Goddard
  • Changing an Ubuntu UID and GID to 501 for Mac OS X Filesystem Access
  • udevinfo on ubuntu 10.4 “lucid”

But First, Write No Code Something I see often in person and online are programmers constantly implementing common solutions, reinventing wheels, or embracing NIH.

New In KDE Partition Manager

Filed under
  • New In KDE Partition Manager 1.1 (I): Mount Management
  • Panel icon sizes in KDE SC 4.5
  • Lancelot and KMail in 4.5

full circle magazine Issue 37 available

Filed under

Full Circle issue #37 is out with a review of Lubuntu, more programming in Python, talk about streaming media, and more.

Firefox 3.6.4 release candidate available for testing

Filed under
Moz/FF The release candidate build of Firefox 3.6.4 is now available for download and public testing. This version fixes issues found in the previous beta of Firefox 3.6.4.

My dad is a Linux user

Filed under
Linux Yesterday, I installed Linux Mint on my dad's laptop. With the exception of a couple of bits of poorly supported hardware, the installation went without a hitch. I think my dad was genuinely pleased.

Measuring the popularity of distros – Part 3 Torrents

Filed under
Linux Continuing on with the theme of measuring the popularity of Linux distros, today we’ll go for another method. Linux Tracker is a website that provides a bit torrent tracker for various Linux distros and related projects.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

SwagArch 18.02 - U Got Swag?

SwagArch sounds like an interesting concept. The aesthetic side of things is reasonable, although brown as a color and a dark theme make for a tricky choice. The fonts are pretty good overall. But the visual element is the least of the distro's problems. SwagArch 18.02 didn't deliver the basics, and that's what made Dedoimedo sad. Network support plus the clock issue, horrible package management and broken programs, those are things that must work perfectly. Without them, the system has no value. So you do get multimedia support and a few unique apps, however that cannot balance out all the woes and problems that I encountered. All in all, Swag needs a lot more work. Also, it will have a tough time competing with Manjaro and Antergos, which are already established and fairly robust Arch spins. Lastly, it needs to narrow down its focus. The overall integration of elements is pretty weak. Eclectic, jumbled, not really tested. 2/10 for now. Let's see how it evolves. Read more

How Open Source Approach is Impacting Science

Dive into the exciting world of Innovative Science to explore and find out about how the Linux-based Operating System and Open Source are playing a significant role in the major scientific breakthroughs that are taking place in our daily lives. Read more

Programming: Developer Survey, Code That Unmasks, Retaining Newcomers

  • Developers love trendy new languages but earn more with functional programming
    Developer Q&A site Stack Overflow performs an annual survey to find out more about the programmer community, and the latest set of results has just been published.
  • FYI: AI tools can unmask anonymous coders from their binary executables [Ed: Just a kind reminder that if you are e using Microsoft's tools compile source code, there will be surveillance and telemetry in your compiled code]
    Programmers can be potentially identified from the low-level machine-code instructions in their software executables by AI-powered tools. That's according to boffins from Princeton University, Shiftleft, Drexel University, Sophos, and Braunschweig University of Technology, who have described how stylometry can be applied to binary files. That's kinda bad news for people who wish to develop software, such as privacy-protecting apps, anonymously, as this technology can be used to potentially unmask them. It's also kinda good news for crimefighters trying to identify malware authors.
  • How to avoid humiliating newcomers: A guide for advanced developers
    Every year in New York City, a few thousand young men come to town, dress up like Santa Claus, and do a pub crawl. One year during this SantaCon event, I was walking on the sidewalk and minding my own business, when I saw an extraordinary scene. There was a man dressed up in a red hat and red jacket, and he was talking to a homeless man who was sitting in a wheelchair. The homeless man asked Santa Claus, "Can you spare some change?" Santa dug into his pocket and brought out a $5 bill. He hesitated, then gave it to the homeless man. The homeless man put the bill in his pocket. In an instant, something went wrong. Santa yelled at the homeless man, "I gave you $5. I wanted to give you one dollar, but five is the smallest I had, so you oughtta be grateful. This is your lucky day, man. You should at least say thank you!" [...] I still get angry at people on the internet. It happened to me recently, when someone posted a comment on a video I published about Python co-routines. It had taken me months of research and preparation to create this video, and then a newcomer commented, "I want to master python what should I do."

Software: 5 Online Backup Solutions, Lector, Roundcube

  • 5 Online Backup Solutions for Ubuntu Linux
    As the digital age progresses, the amount of data we produce each year is snowballing. There was a time when we could fit all of our personal digital data on a few floppy disks, but many of us now have hundreds of gigabytes, or even terabytes, of photos, videos, music, and documents that we need to backup and protect. Backing up our data locally is essential, but any good backup plan should also include off-site backups. “The Cloud” has promised us unlimited, cheap storage where we can save our ever-growing data. Online cloud backups should be a part of your overall backup plan, but it’s crucial that your data is secure, encrypted, and backed up automatically. Here are a few online backup tools that aim to make cloud backups easy for desktop Linux users.
  • This Qt eBook App for Linux is a Real Page Turner
    Lector a new open-source Qt-based ebook app for Linux desktops. It supports most common DRM-free ebook files, including EPUB, MOBI, and AZW, as well as comic book files in the CBZ or CBR format. In both visuals and in features Lector is something of a page-turner; a desktop ebook reader you can absolutely judge by its cover. So join me as I take a closer look at its features.
  • Roundcube fr_FEM locale 1.3.5
    Roundcube 1.3.5 was released today and with it, I've released version 1.3.5 of my fr_FEM (French gender-neutral) locale. This latest version is actually the first one that can be used with a production version of Roundcube: the first versions I released were based on the latest commit in the master branch at the time instead of an actual release. Not sure why I did that.