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Tuesday, 23 May 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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When geeks and graffiti combine

Filed under
Misc

royal.pingdom.com: There is a lot of geeky graffiti out there. Some are just scribbles on a wall (programmer art being as it is), and some definitely qualify as artwork.

Refocusing LinuxWorld

LinuxToday: It may seem a bit weird to start a discussion about the LinuxWorld Conference and Expo (LWCE) so early in the year, but the topic came up because a friend of mine in the "biz" IM'ed me yesterday and asked if I was going to attend the Open Source Business Conference (OSBC). To me, the OSBC epitomizes what LWCE would be like without the developers and user community in attendance.

Graphics and Free Software: a great 2007, but where is OpenGL?

Filed under
Software

liquidat.wordpress: 2007 was probably The Year Of Free Graphics: AMD/ATI’s specs, a new totally Mesa , output hotplugging via XRandR and the announcement of new shiny OpenGL specs. While this all was truly great, the OpenGL releases never happened, and there are no updates on the topic.

URPMI + RPM5 = True

Filed under
MDV

Per Øyvind Karlsen: I've just finished porting urpmi (and rpmtools) to rpm 5.0, making it the first dependency solver supporting rpm 5.0! There seems to be less regressions with rpm5 currently, this was surprising considering it being a quite recent major release.

Getting Excited About KDE4

Filed under
KDE

linuxappfinder.com: A year ago I was really excited about KDE4, but the lack of some basic features I found whenever I tried a release candidate soured me a bit. I still loved the vision. When the February update showed up in Kubuntu I decided to give it another go. Now I'm happy that I did.

Fight The Power: Greening Your Linux Systems

Filed under
Linux

bmighty.com: Linux has a lot of advantages as a desktop operating system. Power management, unfortunately, still is not one of them. But there are plenty of ways to make a Linux system less power-hungry -- and some of the most effective fixes are also some of the easiest.

Cool Desktop Linux Applications (Part 1): Internet and networking applications

Filed under
Software

linuxondesktop.blogspot: Desktop Linux has seen tremendous growth over the past few years and with this there has also been tremendous growth in number of applications relevant for desktop use available. Now most of the Linux distributions because of either space constraint or well because of licensing issue do not include many really cool applications.

End of life for Debian 3.1

Filed under
Linux

tectonic.co.za: One year after the release of Debian GNU/Linux 4.0, codenamed ‘etch’, and nearly three years after the release of Debian GNU/Linux 3.1, security support for Debian GNU/Linux 3.1 will cease at the end of March.

Extending Ubuntu's Battery Life

Filed under
Ubuntu

phoronix: Last week when traveling to Europe for FOSDEM and other business meetings, I had picked up a new 9-cell battery for a Lenovo ThinkPad T60. While an additional three battery cells will noticeably extend your battery life, you can also extend your battery life by taking a few simple steps.

New add-ons for OpenOffice.org Writer

Filed under
OOo

linuxjournal.com: After a slow start, add-ons for OpenOffice.org are finally starting to reach a critical mass. When I last wrote about add-ons for OpenOffice.org in September 2004, the examples were relatively limited, with extendedPDF the outstanding example.

Open Source Gaming: Nexuiz 2.4 Released!

Filed under
Gaming

tipotheday.com: After a long wait, the latest edition of the fast-paced free and open source FPS, Nexuiz, has been released! Major updates include a new menu system, additional maps, more efficient use of memory, updated textures and graphics, and lots more.

Trafshow - Real Time Traffic Monitoring for the Paranoid

Filed under
Software

raiden.net: Of all the thousands of available or recommended applications out there that every geek (and non-geek) should have in their arsenal of tools, there are a few that slip under the radar and go relatively unnoticed in the tech world. One of those is trafshow. I've been using it for years, and it's one of the best network monitoring tools around.

OOXML Fails to Get Majority Approval at BRM

Filed under
OSS

groklaw: Basically, there were too many proposed changes to be able to cover them in the BRM, so they tried a workaround, but the upshot is ... it's a mess. Oddly, despite the rules, Alex Brown, Updegrove reports, allowed non P countries to vote, but OOXML still couldn't get a majority of the delegations to back it at the BRM.

Adding a UPS to a desktop Linux machine

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: An uninterruptible power supply (UPS) will allow your computer to continue to function for a period of time when mains power is lost. This can help you to smooth over short-term (1-5 minute) loss of power by running from the UPS battery.

Why I prefer Vim and not Emacs

Filed under
Software

masuran.org: If there is one question you could ask to recognize a true geek, it would be “Do you use Vi or Emacs?” If you’re talking to a geek they will either start laughing because they recognize you as a fellow geek or they will start talking about the merits of their favorite editor.

Review: ThinkPad T61 with SLED 10 Linux

Filed under
SUSE

crn.com: Used to be that the only way to get a Linux laptop was to buy a laptop and install it yourself. Not anymore. Lenovo shipped a ThinkPad T61 pre-installed with SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 10 to CMP Channel Test Center for review.

Better Linux Sound Management With ALSA

Filed under
Software

LinuxPlanet: Today we're going to dig into ALSA, the Advanced Linux Sound Architecture, because I think it's the best tool for managing your Linux sound devices. It's good for managing multiple sound devices, and it works in all Linux environments including other window managers, or no X Windows at all.

Installing Wolvix Linux - Full tutorial

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

dedoimedo.com: We all know that Slackware means stability and security. But Slackware has never been a distribution for the weak and elderly. It has always been regarded as one of the more geeky and difficult distros, alongside Gentoo. Until now. Well, Gentoo got Sabayon and Slackware got Wolvix.

Geek of the Month: Richard M. Stallman

Filed under
Linux

junauza.blogspot: Richard Matthew Stallman “RMS” was born on March 16, 1953). He is an American software freedom activist, hacker, and software developer. In September 1983, he launched the GNU Project to create a free Unix-like operating system.

Com One Phoenix Wi-Fi radio rises from embedded Linux platform

Filed under
Sci/Tech

linux.com: Com One's Phoenix Wi-Fi radio is a home music appliance built on an embedded Linux foundation. Phoenix lets you stream music or play podcasts as easily as you can listen to a car radio, once you tell it what you want to hear. Its ability to play Internet radio is nice -- but is it worth its price?

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

  • Pimp your smartphone with the latest Android O Pixel launcher
    If your device is running Android 6.0.1 Marshmallow or above, you can now pimp it out with the latest Google O Pixel launcher. One of the contributors on the XDA Developers forum has recently posted the APK file, which you can install on your smartphone. Before you download the file, make sure your device can install apps that aren’t listed on the Play Store. To do so, open up the Settings menu, tap on Security, and enable the “Unknown sources” option. Once that’s done, all you have to do is download the file and then tap on it in the notification shade to install the launcher on your device.
  • Google is killing off Android's emoji blobs
    The best emojis on the market are no more: Google’s weird blobs are being retired in favour of more conventional circular yellow faces.
  • Google I/O: What about Android on Chrome OS?
    The hottest tech-show ticket these days is Google I/O. In the just-finished 2017 conference, Google announced lots of great stuff, including a lightweight version of Android, Android Go; a first look at the next version of Android, Android O; and a major upgrade to Google Home. One thing that was noticeably missing, however: big news about Android apps on Chrome OS.
  • RaspAnd Marshmallow 6.0.1 Android OS Now Available for Raspberry Pi 3 and 2 SBCs
    After informing us about the availability of a new build of his RaspAnd Nougat operating system for Raspberry Pi 3 and 2 SBCs based on Android 7.1.2, Arne Exton released an updated RaspAnd Marshmallow 6 version.

today's howtos

LinuxAndUbuntu Distro Review Of The Week - Deepin OS

​Depth/Deepin OS is not just another Linux Distro, but one with something new to show. Deepin OS is simply speaking, just beautiful. Deepin OS, formerly known as Deepin, Linux Deepin, and Hiweed GNU/Linux is a Linux distro with an identity crisis. Seriously, this distro has undergone name changes you always have to check twice if the name is still the same. And that is all the negative you are going to say about this distro. Honestly speaking, Deepin OS is surely going to blow you away. I have been keeping an eye on this distro since 2013 and it still manages to impress me. Read more

KDE Leftovers: digikam, KDevelop, Kate, GSoC, and Akademy

  • [digikam] Call to Test the Pre-Release of 5.6.0
    Once again a lot has been going on behind the scenes since the last release. The HTML gallery tool is back, database shrinking (e.g. purging stale thumbnails) is also supported on MySQL, grouping has been improved and additional sidecars can now be specified. Therefore the release of 5.6.0 will be (is already) delayed, as we would like to invite you to test all these features. As usual they are available in the pre-release bundles or obviously directly from the git repository. Please report any dysfunctions, unexpected behaviour or suggestions for improvement to our bug tracker.
  • KDevelop runtimes: Docker and Flatpak integration
    On my last blog post I discussed about how some assumptions such as the platform developed on can affect our development. We need to minimize it by empowering the developers with good tools so that they can develop properly. To that end, I introduced runtimes in our IDE to abstract platforms (much like on Gnome’s Builder or Qt Creator).
  • Kate 17.04.1 available for Windows
  • GSoC - Community Bonding Period with Krita
  • First month report: my feelings about gsoc
  • My Akademy Plans
    The Akademy programme (saturday, sunday) is actually pretty long; the conference days stretch into feels-like-evening to me. Of course, the Dutch are infamous for being “6pm at the dinner table, and eat potatoes” so my notion of evening may not match what works on the Mediterranean coast. Actually, I know it doesn’t since way back when at a Ubuntu Developer Summit in Sevilla it took some internal-clock-resetting to adjust to dinner closer to midnight than 18:00.