Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Monday, 23 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Top 40 Linux blogs

Filed under
Linux
Web

linuxworld: Doc Searls makes some good points about blog ranking. It's so bogus, but it's so much fun people can't stop doing it. So here is the Official Linux Blog Top 40 List, divided into A, B, C, and D lists for your status-seeking convenience.

Mozilla Corp, ARM Inc. and Others to Build a New Device

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

softpedia: Mozilla Corp., Arm Ltd, MontaVista Software Inc. and four other companies are trying to extend the market for a new category of devices, a combination between a smartphone and a laptop.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Software Freedom Day

  • Kopete for KDE 4.0; Skype 1.4.0 final released
  • Low disk space
  • Linux group calls Microsoft's bluff
  • The Four Freedoms Applied to Software as a Service
  • ODF and OOXML: Something New to Ponder
  • A TortoiseSVN replacement for Ubuntu
  • NFS Client Updates for 2.6.24
  • If I needed one more reason to dismiss Debian...
  • Open Source for Business: Now More Than Ever, Part 1
  • David Pogue on the OLPC
  • NetworkManager 0.7 feature list
  • Will open source desktops succumb to bloat?
  • MyFive: Making Firefox Better
  • Optimized pow() approximation for Java and C / C++

Could PCLinuxOS 2007 Spell Death for Windows on the Desktop?

Filed under
PCLOS

Linux Today: I have been using Linux for about 12 years now and a few weeks ago I discovered PCLinuxOS 2007. Being so impressed with this new, fast, and super easy to use Linux distribution, has made me not only an advocate but an evangelist.

System and enviromental variables

Filed under
HowTos

polishlinux: System and enviromental variables define parts of the system behavior so it’s worth knowing what they are, what they influence and how to adjust them to your needs. This is the last part of the “console basics” series.

Ubuntu chief bids for prima-donna status

Filed under
Ubuntu

the register (open season): I'd like to live in a tub of cream cheese icing. Sadly, that's not an option for me. It is, however, an option for Canonical/Ubuntu head Mark Shuttleworth. The open source advocate has plenty of cash - enough cash to build a breathing apparatus and waste removal system for a man-sized icing pool.

Your First Computer

more openSUSE and Novell headlines

Filed under
SUSE
  • ReviewLinux.Com: First Look openSUSE 10.3 i386 DVD

  • Novell boosts desktop Linux
  • Novell Gives openSUSE the (Faster) Boot
  • New Feature List for OpenSUSE 10.3
  • Stay Away from OpenSUSE 10.3
  • OpenSUSE 10.3 Launch Party Locations
  • OpenSUSE Linux 10.3 Review
  • OpenSUSE 10.3 opens for business
  • And Novell Fires the First Shot

a few statistics:

Filed under
News
  • Swedish police saves 400 cars by using MySQL

  • Hardware4linux : more than 1500 systems reported and ranked
  • LATU Uruguay Buying 100,000 OLPC XO's Over Classmate PC!!

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • check weather conditions and forecasts on the command line

  • How to automatically sign in to Ubuntu
  • Using a MySQL Performance Tuning Analyzer Script
  • What package is that file in ?
  • Handy script protects Linux against traffic spikes
  • Use ssh on multiple servers at one time
  • Installing Audacity MP3 export support on Linux
  • Adjust the Transparency of Window Decorations with Compiz
  • Digitizing records and tapes with Audacity
  • Compiz-Fusion On Ubuntu 7.10 “Gutsy Gibbin”

Sweet Symphony is out of tune with OOo

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Last month, just one week after IBM announced it would help with OpenOffice.org's development, the company released Lotus Symphony, an office suite based on OpenOffice.org code. I found a lot of slick features in Lotus Symphony, but I worry that Symphony could affect the OpenOffice.org community adversely.

5 Reasons your parents should NOT use Linux

Filed under
Linux

foogazi.com: Lets face it, there are some parents that insist on using certain applications that are strictly made for Windows and just do not function properly in Wine. Some parents do not want alternatives to Windows applications.

Initial Impressions of Kubuntu 7.10 beta

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu-tutorials: My initial impressions are that KDE is very clean looking. The display is very crisp on my machine and its easy to navigate. It appears to have most of the applications I need out of the box.

Trying Mandriva

Filed under
MDV

omat.nl: I first tried KUbuntu Gutsy, but that halted on 'installing language pack' in the gui-installer. I tried to resolve that, but did not succeed in it. I installed MEPIS. The current stable 6.5 is based on ubuntu Dapper, which is kind of old. But that evening Helio pointed me to Mandriva.

The Penguin Grows Horns: Installing FreeBSD

Filed under
BSD

penguin pete: It has always bothered me that this site and my experiences stay inside of Linux so much, when the whole site is about "free and open source software". I've only dabbled in non-Linux FOSS with live CDs and such, but I'm ready to install a real BSD and stick with it for awhile.

Fedora 8 Test 3 Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

phoronix: There's still a month until the final release of Fedora 8, but Fedora 8 Test 3 is now available, which has a wealth of a new features. Among these new features is an Online Desktop powered via BigBoard, KDE 3.5.7 can be found on the KDE Live images, improved Live installations, and improved yum performance for package management.

Also: What New in Fedora 8
And: Mmm... Fedora 8 Test 3...

Run your own home-entertainment server with Linux and MythTV

Filed under
HowTos

www.hexus.net: Once upon a time, people lived in caves and hunted animals with spears. Then, they recorded things from the TV onto small black cartridges filled with magnetic tape. As is tradition these days, as soon as people develop an interesting hardware device, people start work on a software-based solution to accomplish similar features on more conventional hardware - in this case, the VDR project began in February 2000 as an attempt to bring DVR functionality to a conventional GNU/Linux PC.

ext4 2.6.24 Merge Plans

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "I've just released the 2.6.23-rc9-ext4-1. It collapses some patches in preparation for pushing them to Linus, and adds some of the cleanup patches that had been incorporated into Andrew's broken-out-2007-10-01-04-09 series," announced Theodore Ts'o.

Is it time to give Red Hat some respect?

Filed under
Linux

zdnet blogs: Red Hat is the Rodney Dangerfield of open source. We talk here a lot about Microsoft and Novell, about Sun and IBM. Red Hat just keeps plugging away.

Scott McGregor, Thunderbird Lead Engineer leaves Mozilla

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozilla links: Scott McGregor, Thunderbird lead engineer, announced that on October 12 he will leave the Mozilla Corporation to pursuit other career interests. He plans, however, to continue his role as module owner for Thunderbird as a volunteer.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • GoboLinux 016
    GoboLinux is available for 64-bit x86 computers exclusively. The ISO I downloaded for GoboLinux 016 was 958MB in size. Booting from the installation media brings up a text-based menu system where we are asked to select our preferred language from a list of six European languages. We are then asked to select our keyboard's layout from another list. At this point, the system drops us to a command prompt where we are logged in as the root user. The default shell is zsh. A welcome message lets us know we can run the startx command to launch a desktop environment or run the Installer command to begin installing the distribution.
  • Solus Linux Working On A Flatpak-Based, Optimized Steam Runtime
    The Solus Linux developers have been working on their "Linux Steam Integration" for Steam and improvements around the Steam runtime, with this being one of the distributions interested in good Linux performance and making use of some Clear Linux optimizations, while their next step is looking at Flatpak-packaging up of libraries needed by the Steam runtime to fork a Flatpak-happy Linux gaming setup.
  • It’s ‘Best Linux Distro’ Time Again
    It’s time to start the process of choosing the FOSS Force Reader’s Choice Award winner for Best Desktop Linux Distro for 2016. This is the third outing for our annual poll, which began in a March, 2015 contest that was won by Ubuntu, which bested runner-up Linux Mint by only 11 votes. Last year we moved the voting up to January, in a contest which saw Arch Linux as the overall winner, with elementary OS in second place. Just like last year, this year’s polling will be a two round process. The first round, which began early Friday afternoon when the poll quietly went up on our front page, is a qualifying round. In this round, we’re offering a field of 19 of the top 20 distros on Distrowatch’s famous “Page Hit Ranking” list. Those whose favorite distro isn’t on the list shouldn’t worry — your distro’s not out of the game yet. Below the poll there’s a place to write-in any distro that’s not in the poll to be tallied for possible inclusion in the second and final round of polling to follow.
  • Tracktion NAMM 2017 Preview [Ed: Raspberry Pi with Ubuntu]
  • Snapdragon 410E SBC offers long lifecycle support at $85
    The Linux/Android-ready Inforce 6309L is a cheaper version of the DragonBoard 410c-like Inforce 6309. It sacrifices GbE and LVDS, but has 10-year support. Inforce Computing has released a more affordable and slightly less feature rich version of its commercial-oriented, circa-2015 Inforce 6309 SBC. Like the Inforce 6309, the new Inforce 6309L has the same 85 x 54mm footprint and much the same feature set as Arrow’s Qualcomm-backed, community-backed DragonBoard 410c SBC. It also offers the same Linux and Android BSPs used by the DragonBoard 410c, one of the first SBCs to adopt Linaro’s 96Boards form-factor.
  • It’s time to spring-clean your IT contracts
    The start of a new year is a time for review and planning, in business, as well as in our personal lives. It’s likely that you will be focused on finalising your company’s objectives and strategy for the year ahead. But it’s also important to consider whether the tools and processes that you have in place remain fit for purpose – and that includes your contract templates and contractual risk and compliance processes. When it comes to the law, “the only thing that is constant is change”. Without fail, each year brings the introduction of new legislation, case law and regulatory guidance that may have an impact on your contracts – whether it’s the terms of use or privacy policy for your website or app, or the contract terms that you use when supplying or purchasing technology services. Therefore, it’s important to carry out a regular review of your contract terms (and any existing contracts) to make sure that they remain compliant with law and are future-proofed as much as possible in terms of new legal and regulatory developments that you know are around the corner.
  • Chinese investors buy owner of PCWorld, IDC
    International Data Group, the owner of PCWorld magazine, several other tech journals and the IDC market research organisation, has been bought by two Chinese investors. China Oceanwide Holdings Group and IDG Capital (no affiliate of IDG) have paid between US$500 million and US$1 billion for IDG sans its high-performance computing research businesses. The two Chinese entities had made separate bids but were told by investment banker Goldman Sachs to join hands. The sale of IDG has been cleared by the US Committee on Foreign Investment and should be completed by end of the first quarter this year. China Oceanwide Holdings Group, founded by chairman Zhiqiang Lu, is active in financial services, real estate, technology, and media among others.

OpenStack News

  • So you want to create a new official OpenStack project...
    OpenStack development is organized around a mission, a governance model and a set of principles. Project teams apply for inclusion, and the Technical Committee (TC), elected by all OpenStack contributors, judges whether that team work helps with the OpenStack mission and follows the OpenStack development principles. If it does, the team is considered part of the OpenStack development community, and its work is considered an official OpenStack project. The main effect of being official is that it places the team work under the oversight of the Technical Committee. In exchange, recent contributors to that team are considered Active Technical Contributors (ATCs), which means they can participate in the vote to elect the Technical Committee.
  • Why you should hire upstream
  • The OpenStack Interoperability Challenge Update: Phase Two Progress
    In 2016 the OpenStack Interoperability Challenge was originally announced by IBM GM Don Rippert at the OpenStack Austin Summit. This effort was the first initiative to use the deployment and execution of enterprise workloads using automated deployment tools as the means of proving interoperability across OpenStack cloud environments. The first phase of the OpenStack Interoperability Challenge culminated with a Barcelona Summit Keynote demo comprised of 16 vendors all running the same enterprise workload and automation tools to illustrate that OpenStack enables workload portability across public and private OpenStack clouds. Here is a short trip down memory lane:
  • OpenStack’s Stewardship Working Group and what it can do for you
    Stewardship is defined as the careful and responsible management of something entrusted to one’s care. OpenStack Foundation community members formed a Stewardship Working Group to ensure that “people at the bottom and the boundaries of the organization choice over how to serve a customer, a citizen, a community.”
  • Tips for instance configuration, creating a new project, and more OpenStack news

Phoronix on Graphics

Phoronix Benchmarks