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Friday, 20 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Forgotten PC history: The true origins of the personal computer

computerworld.com: This year marks an almost forgotten 40th anniversary: the conception of the device that ultimately became the PC. And no, it did not happen in California.

Linux Kernel news: Wlan and Webcams for everyone

Filed under
Linux

liquidat.wordpress: At the Ottawa Linux symposium the current state of Wlan in Linux was highlighted in detail. In the meantime, the development version of the Linux kernel included the gspca webcam drivers.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • The Open Source Licensing Implosion

  • Open source census says, free as in beer
  • QNX opens up the source code for its filesystems
  • IBM Exec on Linux Apps: 'I'm Tired of Waiting'
  • Exporting logs from Suunto X6HR watches on Linux
  • Microsoft creates open-source lab in RP
  • Canonical Preparing Virtual Ubuntu Server Appliances
  • An unplanned quick look at LinuxWorld 2008
  • Drizzle makes MySQL lean, mean again
  • Why Europe loves open source
  • 2.6.27-rc2, "A Lot Of Random Changes"
  • Some Pictures Worth a Thousand Words - Caldera OpenLinux Lite
  • Ubuntu attracts the lion's share of LinuxWorld's smaller crowds
  • My Bootchart Record: 12 Seconds to Boot, 7 Seconds to X
  • Tiny open source computer made from six ICs
  • Portrait: Michelle Murrain lives the open source lifestyle
  • Outsider No More: Linux Critical In Many Data Centers
  • At last -- native apps for Motorola Linux phones

Stunning OpenSolaris running on VirtualBox

Filed under
OS

jamesselvakumar.wordpress: Having tried many versions of Ubuntu, Fedora, OpenSuse and PCLinuxOS, I thought of trying Solaris, but it was never easy. I ordered a free Solaris DVD from Sun but it would never install inside VirtualBox. I always viewed Solaris as something very complex to setup and needs extensive knowledge about it.

Being Debian leader can be 'scary at times'

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: A little more than three months after he became leader of the Debian GNU/Linux project, Steve McIntyre is beginning to realise that it can be a little scary at times.

New gOS Linux OS Surrounded by Netbooks

Filed under
Linux

pcmag.com: gOS, the Linux OS which has powered the $199 Wal-Mart PC and assorted netbooks, announced its latest version, which the company calls gOS3 Gadgets.

Fedora Art Concepts

Filed under
Linux

linuxloop.com: Today I want to discuss some of the best Fedora art submissions judged, appropriately enough, not by the art but by the concept. I will even go so far as to rank them. First place goes to…

First Look: Mozilla Snowl

Filed under
Moz/FF

webworkerdaily.com: Now this all sounds very lovely, but it’s kinda ‘meh’ - all Snowl seems to do is chop up some message data into a different presentation, there doesn’t seem to be any intelligence in analyzing the patterns of communications.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Configuring WPA-PSK (TKIP) in Slackware

  • How to Set WinAmp equalizer presets in Banshee 1.2
  • Tweet From your KDE 4 Desktop
  • Run compiz on Blacklisted Hardware
  • Using Grep To Streamline Your Shell And Command Line Scripting
  • Posting to Identi.ca From Ubuntu 8.04 Using Gwibber Client
  • Flipping the Linux switch: ZOMG! ffmpeg
  • Howto Check Wireless link quality in Ubuntu Linux
  • A Guide to Linux Graphics Software 02: fotoshopping without Photo Shop

Conversations With My Dad About Open Source

Filed under
OSS

linux-mag.com: My father was one of those old school guys when it came to adopting computer technology. During the early years of the Internet, it took him a while to get his mind around the business model. By 1999, he called me one day and said “Know anything about this company Red Hat?

Today's Highlights from LinuxWorld

Filed under
Linux
  • Today's Highlights from LinuxWorld

  • At LinuxWorld, problem-solvers hunt open-source solutions
  • Mobile takes center stage at LinuxWorld
  • Video: IBM: Linux in 2018?
  • I went to Moscone Center and all I got was this stupid T-Shirt
  • IBM furthers the Linux cause with server, desktop moves

IBM Desktop Linux Plan Faces Steep Challenges

Filed under
Linux

crn.com: IBM faces an uphill battle in its plans to work with Linux vendors and PC makers to deliver Linux-based desktop systems—but not one it can't win.

Is the Linux desktop missing the boat?

Filed under
Linux

openlogic.com/blogs: Last year, there was a bit of discussion about how the launch of Vista was going to open a lot of doors for Linux on the desktop. I’m not going to go into a discussion about the pros and cons of Windows Vista and why the door is open to alternatives, but I have been very interested in seeing how this would turn out.

ubuntu headlines

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Kernel Next

  • Dell XPS 1530n and Studio 15n Now Available with Ubuntu 8.04
  • Canonical Bundles Alfresco Enterprise CMS and Ubuntu Linux
  • Canonical to Offer Yahoo! Zimbra Desktop Through Ubuntu(R) Partner Repository
  • Ubuntu gets into unified comms, chides Microsoft

Gentoo 2008.0: Return to greatness?

Filed under
Gentoo

linux.com: When the long-awaited Gentoo 2008.0 release finally hit mirrors last month, the two largest groups of users found themselves out of luck: x86 users discovered that their live CD wouldn't copy the kernel during install, and the AMD64 image wouldn't fit onto a standard CD-ROM. This was not a great start for a distribution whose comeback may rest upon this release.

The importance of UNIX in SOA environments

Filed under
News

Discover how and why existing systems and applications with which you are already familiar deployed on operating systems that you know well are so critical to the present and future of Web-based computing, particularly in the area of SOA.

openSUSE shorts

Filed under
SUSE
  • Join the openSUSE proofreading team

  • Announcing Hack Week III
  • Novell Ain’t the Bad Guy

Comparing HAMMER And Tux3

Filed under
Linux

kerneltrap.org: "The big advantage Hammer has over Tux3 is, it is up and running and released in the Dragonfly distro," began Daniel Phillips, offering a comparison between the two filesystem. He continued, "the biggest disadvantage is, it runs on BSD, not Linux."

Sub £200 mini laptop launched

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

reghardware.co.uk: The mini laptop market has expanded yet again with the launch of a 7in machine costing under £200. Called the miniBook, it measures 222 x 165 x 30mm, weighs in at 650g and sports a 7in, 800 x 480 pixel display. Linux comes pre-installed.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Devices: Beelink S1 Mini PC, Aaeon’s SBC, Kobo and LEDE

  • Beelink S1 Mini PC and Linux – Comedy Gold
    The Beelink S1 is a small, silent mini PC released in August 2017 retailing for around 300 dollars (250 euros). It’s produced by Shenzhen AZW Technology Co Ltd, a Chinese company that focuses on Android smart TV boxes, Intel mini PCs, and home cloud TV boxes. The S1 ships with an activated copy of Windows 10. But what makes this mini PC interesting? For starters, it purports to run Ubuntu. Combined with a quad core Celeron CPU, dual monitor support (HDMI and VGA), 4K video, expansion options, together with a raft of other features, the machine looks a mouthwatering prospect compared to many other mini PCs.
  • Kaby Lake Pico-ITX SBC features dual M.2 slots
    Aaeon’s “PICO-KBU1” SBC is built on Intel 7th Gen U-series CPUs with up to 16GB DDR4, dual GbE ports, and M.2 B-key and E-Key expansion. The PICO-KBU1 SBC is equipped with Intel’s dual-core, 15W TDP 7th Gen U-series CPUs from the latest Kaby Lake generation. Other 100 x 72mm Pico-ITX boards that run Kaby Lake U-Series processors include Axiomtek’s PICO512. As usual with Aaeon, no OS support is listed.
  • Kobo firmware 4.6.9995 mega update (KSM, nickel patch, ssh, fonts)
    It has been ages that I haven’t updated the MegaUpdate package for Kobo. Now that a new and seemingly rather bug-free and quick firmware release (4.6.9995) has been released, I finally took the time to update the whole package to the latest releases of all the included items. The update includes all my favorite patches and features: Kobo Start Menu, koreader, coolreader, pbchess, ssh access, custom dictionaries, and some side-loaded fonts.
  • LEDE v17.01.4 service release
    Version 17.01.4 of the LEDE router distribution is available with a number of important fixes. "While this release includes fixes for the bugs in the WPA Protocol disclosed earlier this week, these fixes do not fix the problem on the client-side. You still need to update all your client devices. As some client devices might never receive an update, an optional AP-side workaround was introduced in hostapd to complicate these attacks, slowing them down."

Samsung Leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • FOSDEM 2018 Real-Time Communications Call for Participation
  • Top Bank, Legal and Software Industry Executives to Keynote at the Open Source Strategy Forum
  • Copyleft is Dead. Long live Copyleft!
    As you may have noticed, we recently re-licensed mgmt from the AGPL (Affero General Public License) to the regular GPL. This is a post explaining the decision and which hopefully includes some insights at the intersection of technology and legal issues.
  • Crowdsourcing the way to a more flexible strategic plan
    Trust the community. Opening a feedback platform to anyone on campus seems risky, but in hindsight I'd do it again in a heartbeat. The responses we received were very constructive; in fact, I rarely received negative and unproductive remarks. When people learned about our honest efforts at improving the community, they responded with kindness and support. By giving the community a voice—by really democratizing the effort—we achieved a surprising amount of campus-wide buy-in in a short period of time. Transparency is best. By keeping as many of our efforts as public as possible, we demonstrated that we were truly listening to our customers and understanding the effects of the outdated technology policies and decisions that were keeping them from doing their best work. I've always been a proponent of the idea that everyone is an agent of innovation; we just needed a tool that allowed everyone to make suggestions. Iterate, iterate, iterate. Crowdsourcing our first-year IT initiatives helped us create the most flexible and customer-centric plan we possibly could. The pressure to move quickly and lay down a comprehensive strategic plan is very real; however, by delaying that work and focusing on the evolving set of data flowing from our community, we were actually able to better demonstrate our commitment to our customers. That helped us build critical reputational capital, which paid off when we did eventually present a long-term strategic plan—because people already knew we could achieve results. It also helped us recruit strong allies and learn who we could trust to advance more complicated initiatives.
  • Reform is a DIY, modular, portable computer (work in progress)
    Want a fully functional laptop that works out of the box? There are plenty to choose from. Want a model that you can upgrade? That’s a bit tougher to find: some modern laptops don’t even let you replace the RAM. Then there’s the Reform. It’s a new DIY, modular laptop that’s designed to be easy to upgrade and modify. The CAD designs will even be available if you want to 3D print your own parts rather than buying a kit. You can’t buy a Reform computer yet. But developer Lukas Hartmann and designer Ana Dantes have developed a prototype and are soliciting feedback on the concept.
  • New neural network teaches itself Go, spanks the pros
    While artificial intelligence software has made huge strides recently, in many cases, it has only been automating things that humans already do well. If you want an AI to identify the Higgs boson in a spray of particles, for example, you have to train it on collisions that humans have already identified as containing a Higgs. If you want it to identify pictures of cats, you have to train it on a database of photos in which the cats have already been identified.