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Tuesday, 28 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Ten Firefox themes for kids

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozillalinks: Here are ten Firefox themes for web savvy children to enjoy this holiday vacation.

Ubuntu: the Not Universal Operating System?

Filed under
Ubuntu

lucas-nussbaum.net: I find it funny to see the number of Ubuntu variants. I can understand that for marketing reasons (Debian doesn’t really know about marketing), it is good to advertise Kubuntu, Xubuntu, etc. Even if it’s the same distro and the same packages. But seriously. An Xubuntu EEE now.

Rescue Your PC With Linux Live CD

Filed under
Linux

maketecheasier.com: I always advise my friends and customers to keep a copy of the Linux Live CD. The reason is that in the event that your Windows crashes (Well, they often do), you can boot up the Linux Live CD and rescue all your data.

Review of Damn Small Linux 4.1

Filed under
Linux

associatedcontent.com: Damn Small Linux 4.1 - "Damn, that IS a small operating system" is not something you hear everyday*, After using DSL 4.1, you may just hear yourself saying it.

First Impressions of Ubuntu 7.10 Desktop Edition

Filed under
Ubuntu

devx.com: I am a proud veteran user of the Ubuntu Linux operating system. I've been running Ubuntu since 6.06LTS was alpha. So although I had just received my Ubuntu Linux version 7.04 installation CDs when Ubuntu released version 7.10, I was eager to check the newest version out.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Linux.com Weekly Wire #3 (video)

  • People of openSUSE: Marcus Meissner
  • Build a DIY Digg Clone with Drupal
  • Review: Linutop (video)
  • OLPC struggles to realise ambitious vision
  • Everything you know about networking just changed
  • Max, Matthew, Fedora and Red Hat: what's next?
  • Top 5 Ubuntu Applications
  • Samba's Big Step
  • Snort Report 11 Posted
  • OLPC and the Kindle
  • Nokia N810 Internet Tablet Review
  • Dark Horizons: Lore Invasion becomes free
  • PlayOnLinux, new design and new language
  • Uncover Firefox secret add-ons install button
  • New players enliven open source
  • Sanity prevails on DistroWatch
  • KDE Office Suite for Os2008
  • OggConvert makes Ogg converts (and converts to Oggs)
  • Compiz Fusion and a WiiMote!
  • Making KDE dialogue boxes appear from shell scripts

Five desktop Linux highlights of 2007

Filed under
Linux

DesktopLinux: Sometimes putting together a best-of-the-year list is like pulling teeth. There simply isn't enough big news to fill the list out. That was not a problem for desktop Linux in 2007. This year was one of the most eventful years in desktop Linux's short history.

So Long Matthew, And Thanks for All the Quotes

Filed under
Linux

Linux Today: Somebody needs to send a memo to all of the corporations in the Western world: what's with all the big announcements this week? Don't you know the media is sitting around in a collective sugar coma, having eaten way too much at the office holiday parties? C'mon, you're making us look bad, here.

Xsnow, Bring Christmas to Your Desktop

Filed under
Software

inux.byexamples.com: Did you live at a place where you can observed the snow drops? I don’t, thats why I urge to see snow flakes drops from the sky. To fulfill my tiny little hope, I bring snow drops to my desktop.

Kubuntu 8.04 Hardy Heron Alpha 2 Screenshots

Filed under
Ubuntu

phoronix: The second alpha release for the Ubuntu Hardy Heron family is now available. In addition to the new Ubuntu 8.04 Alpha 2 build, also updated are Kubuntu, Edubuntu, JeOS, Xunbuntu, Gobuntu, and Ubuntu Studio.

Introducing Weave

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla Labs: We’re now launching a new project within Mozilla Labs to formally explore blending of the desktop and the Web through deeper integration of the browser with online services. This project will be known as Weave and it will focus on finding ways to enhance the Firefox user experience.

2007 Top Ten Free and Open Source Legal Issues

Filed under
OSS

lawandlifesiliconvalley.blogspot: The year 2007 has been the most active year for legal developments in the history of free and open source (“FOSS”). In fact, you would have been hard pressed in past years to enumerate even five important legal developments. However 2007 permits the creation of a traditional “top ten” list. My list of the top ten FOSS legal developments in 2007 follows:

Changes at Red Hat: Can Linux leader handle the delta between CEO A and CEO B

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techtarget.com: CNET news is reporting that Red Hat CEO Matthew Szulik is stepping down effective January 1st and handing control of the world’s most popular enterprise Linux provider to former Delta airlines COO James Whitehurst. The article assures us that Mr. Whitehurst used to be a programmer and in fact runs four distributions of Linux at home (Fedora, OpenSUSE, Ubuntu, and … DSL? I’m curious to know what they are…).

How a Linux Download Topped YouTube's Hit List

Filed under
Linux

wired blog: The hottest thing on YouTube this month isn't The Dark Knight trailer or that clip of a baby giving an evil eye. It's video of somebody downloading a copy of Ubuntu, a Linux-based operating system. How did something so completely boring top the list?

A Look at the Modern X Server

Filed under
Software

informit.com: Since its creation in the early '80s, X has evolved considerably through a series of incremental changes. David Chisnall looks at the state of a modern X server and how it differs from its ancestor in a number of ways.

F*cking programming

Filed under
Humor

codeulate.com: Yesterday I stumbled onto a delightful tool from Google Labs: Code Search. Turns out Google is now crawling through source code. Granted access to billions of lines of code and the awesome power of Google’s search technology, I did what any rational, thinking programmer would do: I typed in some profanity and hit enter.

Asustek Eee PC shipments beat expectations

Filed under
Hardware

digitimes.com: In less than one quarter, accumulated worldwide shipments of Asustek Computer's Eee PC have reached nearly 350,000 units, exceeding the estimated 300,000 units made by industry watchers, according to the company.

ATI fglrx 8.44/7.12 on openSUSE

Filed under
Software

CyberOrg: This time there is no how-to, hopefully the new drivers will be provided via 1-click soon. Here is a quick look at the state of the matter.

Commercial Sound And Music Software For Linux, Part 2

Filed under
Software

linuxjournal: As promised, the second part of this series presents still more commercially available music and sound software for Linux. Come see (and hear) what your money will buy...

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Use md5sum to Verify Data Integrity

  • Enhancing ‘rm’ to Send Files to Trash in KDE or Gnome
  • Syncing your BlackBerry on Linux
  • Howto Clean up your packages
  • Take charge of your window manager with WMCTRL and Devil's Pie
  • How to setup an HTTP proxy with privoxy
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More in Tux Machines

GNOME Migration and Slideshow

  • The Linux Migration: Corporate Collaboration, Part 2
    Note that a number of folks have suggested alternative calendar applications. I’ve rejected these so far because I don’t think they’ll fit into my workflow or my environment, but they may work for others. Some of the applications I’ve seen suggested include Rainlendar, Calcurse, or KOrganizer. Some of these applications address some of the shortcomings of GNOME Calendar, but none of them address all the major issues I’ve outlined here (based on my testing thus far).
  • GNOME 3.24 Provides Users With More Pleasing Linux Desktop Experience

Dowry to Linux Foundation From NSA Ally

  • AT&T takes up membership in the Linux Foundation, furthers open source efforts
    AT&T has become a Platinum member in the Linux Foundation, a move that reflects the telco’s ongoing effort to implement open source and open networks not only in its own networks but also to drive broader industry collaboration. One example of this is AT&T's Enhanced Control, Orchestration, Management and Policy (ECOMP) architecture. In February, AT&T contributed several million lines of ECOMP code to The Linux Foundation, as well as the new Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) Project based on production-ready code from AT&T and OPEN-O contributors.
  • AT&T Joins The Linux Foundation as a Platinum Member
  • AT&T Joins The Linux Foundation as a Platinum Member
    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit advancing professional open source management for mass collaboration, today announced that AT&T has become a Platinum member. This follows news of the company’s contribution of several million lines of ECOMP code to The Linux Foundation, as well as the new Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) Project based on production-ready code from AT&T and OPEN-O contributors.

GNU/Linux on Servers: VisionMobile Report, Cilium, Microservices, and Kubernetes

  • VisionMobile Report Lays Out Developer Salaries by Skill, Software Sector, and Location
    In 2017, that means skilled cloud and backend developers, as well as those who work in emerging technologies including Internet of Things (IoT), machine learning and augmented/virtual reality (AR/VR) can make more money -- tens or sometimes hundreds of times more -- than frontend web and mobile developers whose skills have become more commoditized. “In Western Europe, for example, the median backend developer earns 12% more than the median web developer; a machine learning developer makes 28% more,” according to the report.
  • Cilium leverages Linux kernel for advanced container networking
    Networking has always been one of the most persistent headaches when working with containers. Even Kubernetes—fast becoming the technology of choice for container orchestration—has limitations in how it implements networking. Tricky stuff like network security is, well, even trickier. Now an open source project named Cilium, which is partly sponsored by Google, is attempting to provide a new networking methodology for containers based on technology used in the Linux kernel. Its goal is to give containers better network security and a simpler model for networking.
  • Modules vs. microservices
    Much has been said about moving from monoliths to microservices. Besides rolling off the tongue nicely, it also seems like a no-brainer to chop up a monolith into microservices. But is this approach really the best choice for your organization? It’s true that there are many drawbacks to maintaining a messy monolithic application. But there is a compelling alternative which is often overlooked: modular application development. In this article, we'll explore what this alternative entails and show how it relates to building microservices.
  • What Is Kubernetes?
    Kubernetes is open source software for automating deployment, scaling, and management of containerized applications. The project is governed by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, which is hosted by The Linux Foundation. And it’s quickly becoming the Linux of the cloud, says Jim Zemlin, executive director of The Linux Foundation. Running a container on a laptop is relatively simple. But connecting containers across multiple hosts, scaling them when needed, deploying applications without downtime, and service discovery among several aspects, are really hard challenges. Kubernetes addresses those challenges with a set of primitives and a powerful API.

OSS Leftovers: Harvard University Survey, ASF at 18 Years, Heiko Tietze at LibreOffice

  • Survey seeks to discover the motivations behind open source contributions
    Peer production is one of three fundamental ways to organize human economic activity, along with markets and firms. Yet, although it underlies billions of dollars in open source software production, it is the least understood. Participants in open source are not organized in firms, where they would work under the supervision of managers and earn a salary, nor are they individuals in a market, responding to price signals. The economics of peer production is an interesting area of study that raises many important questions regarding the incentives behind voluntary participation, the efficiency of production, the tools and models that can quantify and explain how the process works, and so forth. My doctoral research at Harvard University considered incentives issues that arise in a software economy. In particular, my work used principles from market design and mechanism design to address problems, such as how to incentivize high-quality submissions to address bugs or features, and how to elicit truthful prediction of task completion time.
  • The Apache® Software Foundation Announces 18 Years of Open Source Leadership
    The Apache Software Foundation (ASF), the all-volunteer developers, stewards, and incubators of more than 350 Open Source projects and initiatives, announced today its 18th Anniversary and accomplishments, and rallied support to ensure future innovation.
  • [Video] LibreOffice interview: Heiko Tietze, UX mentor
    An interview with Heiko Tietze, who is working as a UX (user experience) mentor for The Document Foundation.