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Tuesday, 23 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Progress toward Linux on the desktop

Filed under
Linux

Is Linux on the desktop in your future? Momentum in the enterprise is slowly building for “the march of the penguin.” (Please forgive me...I love puns!)

Kernel space: Linux runs into a scalability problem

Filed under
Linux

Part of the fun of working with truly large machines is that one gets to discover new scalability surprises before anybody else. So the SGI folks often have more fun than many of the rest of us. Their latest discovery has to do with the number of kernel threads which, on a 4096-processor system, leads to some interesting kernel behavior.

Compiling a hassle? Not any more.

Filed under
Software

Most linux distributions provide thousands of packages for our computing fun. Somehow they always seem to miss one or two packages that we just have to have. Either that or the package they do provide has, for one reason or none, missing functionality. Sometimes the packages are just plain broken.

Review: DesktopBSD 1.6 RC2

Filed under
Reviews
BSD

After a nice weekend away in Hilton Head, SC, enjoying the nice sun and the company of family and friends, I am back with another review of a BSD-based system. DesktopBSD 1.6 RC2, released April 13, aims to provide a system that is easy to use but maintains the power and functionality of BSD.

enigma: addictive puzzle game with a high dose of dexterity

Filed under
Gaming

Enigma is an addictive puzzle game, a re-invention of the discontinued game “Oxyd” available for Atari, Mac and (some versions) DOS, with hundreds of levels and improved graphics.

The game principle of Enigma is simple: uncover pairs of stones as in the “Concentration” (also known as “Memory” or “Pairs”) board game.

Simple? Yes. Easy? Not by far!

Start Downloading Feisty Now - and Get it Faster on Release Day

Filed under
Ubuntu

Less that 48 hours for Feisty Fawn to be released! I thought I should write about how to go about getting your image the fastest way possible on release day. Ubuntu’s download servers are fast - and I mean really fast - but you still can save a lot of time if you start downloading now.

$100 laptop project plugs kids into digital age

Filed under
OLPC

Khaled Hassounah stood at the front of a dusty classroom, 10 miles outside of Nigeria's capital, Abuja, pointing his index finger at nothing in particular.

"Show me your power adapters," the 31-year-old Hassounah called out. Forty young hands shot up in response, hoisting pronged AC adapters skyward, black cords dangling to the floor.

the tux500 scam of the Linux community

Filed under
Linux

devnet cracked first.

KDE 4 development Live CD available

Filed under
KDE

The KDE svn live DVD was announced three weeks ago already. But today its creator Beineri gave it a nice name, KDE Four Live, and this time it catched my attention.

Mandriva 2007.1 Spring is out!

Filed under
MDV

The new Mandriva release is out, including GNOME 2.18 and Metisse. A more complete tour is available on the wiki.

The iso are appearing, packages are already on the mirrors and Cooker is already alive.

Canonical Signs License Agreement With Open Invention Network

Filed under
Ubuntu

Open Invention Network (OIN), the company formed to spur innovation and protect the Linux System, announced today that Canonical, the commercial sponsor of Ubuntu, has become an OIN licensee, providing Ubuntu users and developers IP protection.

Mandriva raising new funds for Linux business

Filed under
MDV

Mandriva, a struggling seller of the Linux operating system, is in the process of raising "a minimum of 3 million euros," or $4.1 million, the French company said Monday.

The funds will be used to exit bankruptcy protection and to complete the acquisition of server software company Linbox, a merger the companies agreed upon in September 2006 but have been unable to complete.

Debian 4.0 Tiptoes to Leading Edge

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Debian GNU/Linx is a popular Linux-based operating system with excellent software management tools and a development pace that is, depending on your perspective, saner or more plodding than those of its Linux distribution rivals.

Quick Review: Automatix2 for Ubuntu Feisty

Filed under
Software
Reviews

“Automatix2 is a free graphical package manager for the installation, uninstall and configuration of the most commonly requested applications in Debian based Linux operating systems. Currently supported are Ubuntu 7.04, 6.10, 6.06, Debian Etch and Mepis 6.

The Perfect Setup - CentOS 5.0 (32-bit)

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HowTos

This tutorial shows how to set up a CentOS 5.0 based server that offers all services needed by ISPs and web hosters: Apache web server (SSL-capable), Postfix mail server with SMTP-AUTH and TLS, BIND DNS server, Proftpd FTP server, MySQL server, Dovecot POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc.

I will use the following software:

Web Server: Apache 2.2 with PHP 5.1.6
Database Server: MySQL 5.0

Windows migration assistant - Ubuntu Feisty Fawn's secret weapon

Filed under
Ubuntu

Having a read through the Ubuntu Feisty announcements I noticed a clever little addition that had previously remained below my radar - the Windows Migration Assistant (WMA). Yet another reason to try and entice XP users over.

Nice and hypocritical Mark Shuttleworth

Filed under
Ubuntu

In two words: The Hypocritical.

Mark Shuttleworth desires to steal some other "upstream" developers: «We've 50 or so free software developers that are now working for the company, we continue to hire what we think are the very best guys from a variety communities from upstream, from Debian and from other places were innovation happens.»

Mark Shuttleworth: "Time for mass consumer sales of Linux on desktop has not yet come"

Filed under
Interviews

The founder of the Ubuntu-project talks in an interview about the integration of proprietary drivers, the One Laptop per Child project and "great applications" from Microsoft.

Hands on: Running other operating systems alongside Linux

Filed under
HowTos

A few months back the Linux NTFS project released beta drivers for full read-and-write access to NTFS partitions. Previously, read-only support was offered in the kernel, with write support considered unstable and for developers only.

Windows vs. Linux: The Patent Tax

Filed under
OS

With tax day approaching in America, we at the Software Freedom Law Center wanted to share some important information about the hidden taxes added to every copy of Microsoft's Windows operating system. If you run a computer using Windows, you're not just paying for the programmers who put the program together and the corporate operations that brought it to market.

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