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Thursday, 22 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story Ubuntu 10.04 Review srlinuxx 25/06/2010 - 12:29am
Story The myth of Arch Linux and the i586 srlinuxx 25/06/2010 - 12:30am
Story Mozilla: Our browser will not run native code srlinuxx 25/06/2010 - 12:32am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 25/06/2010 - 3:24am
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 25/06/2010 - 5:14am
Story Put your knowledge where your mouth is. srlinuxx 25/06/2010 - 2:05pm
Story More distros at 150Mhz, both good and bad srlinuxx 25/06/2010 - 2:08pm
Story Make the most of your tablet with My Paint srlinuxx 25/06/2010 - 2:10pm
Story Fedora 11 reaches end of life srlinuxx 25/06/2010 - 4:16pm
Story Why Tabs are on Top in Firefox 4 srlinuxx 25/06/2010 - 4:17pm

OpenSolaris tackles Ubuntu dominance

Filed under
OS

zdnet.com.au: Sun has crafted the second release of OpenSolaris with a number of improvements in an attempt to make it more competitive with desktop-orientated Linux distributions such as Canonical's Ubuntu.

The Cost of Free

Filed under
OOo

ruminationsonthedigitalrealm.org: Furious! This describes the response of a portion of the Dutch free and open source afficionados when hearing about the idea that OpenOffice.org might get advertisements as part of the binary package.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Add Sudo to Your Last Bash Command With “!!” Syntax

  • Ubuntu Ibex Wireless and RT61PCI
  • Installing ZFS and setting up a Raid-Z array on Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu How To
  • Wine applications go into Other menu instead of Wine
  • Start X Painlessly
  • Upgrade / Downgrade your Dell Bios On Ubuntu
  • New mail notification with Procmail
  • Change the Week Start Day in Ubuntu
  • Long "which" command form
  • How to Use an AT&T Ericsson F3507g Card on Ubuntu Intrepid

Playing With CrunchBang Linux

Filed under
Linux

bobbo.me.uk: CrunchBang Linux is a new(ish) Ubuntu derivative designed to offer a “good balance of speed and functionality”. Its first release was based on Hardy in April and has just been updated for Intrepid. Installation was … interesting, to say the least.

Novell and what they bring to the party

Filed under
SUSE

bushweed.blogspot: It's almost time for another openSUSE release, and I'm sure there will be many articles written about it in the near future. But what about the company behind the SUSE logo? Novell get a lot of bad press, but do they really deserve it?

10 Things Songbird Does That iTunes Can’t

Filed under
Software

Songbird turned 1.0 this week, and aims to do to iTunes what Firefox did to Internet Explorer. That is, it aims to take the basic design of something closed and proprietary, and turn it into something open and extensible and fun. Songbird aims to give the power back to the people.

Checking out the neighbors

Filed under
Linux

meandubuntu.wordpress: I thought I might spend some time checking out some other distros. I’d like to get a more rounded picture of the “GNUniverse” and get a feel for what some of the other distros offer. I’m listing them in the order I tried them.

Revival of your favourite admin-tool

Filed under
Software

alediaferia.wordpress: Times ago metellius posted this “Idea of the week: Universal config file user interface” and among the comments someone talked about the good old KConfigEditor.

Viewing text files

Filed under
Software

easierbuntu.blogspot: One of the central philosophies behind Unix, which Linux has inherited from it, is that configuration files should be plain text. For this reason, Linux has a lot of incredibly powerful tools to enable you to manipulate text files. I'm going to go through several that you can use to view text files from the command line.

Is Symbian any good?

Filed under
OS

blogs.zdnet.com: In all the talk about Nokia acquiring Symbian, setting up a foundation to support it and scouring the world for sales, one key question remains unanswered. Is the software any good?

Ubuntu 9.04 Home Encryption Performance

Filed under
Ubuntu

phoronix.com: One of the exciting features that is being worked on for Ubuntu 9.04 is encrypted home directories. At the request of Canonical, we have carried out a few benchmarks showing what effect the Ubuntu 9.04 home encryption feature has on the system's overall performance.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 49

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: Issue #49 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out. In this week’s issue: Andreas Jaeger: openSUSE 11.1 Goes RC2, Joe Brockmeier: Mounting remote directories using FUSE and sshfs on openSUSE, and Henne Vogelsang: What’s Working Well and What To Do With It.

Why the IBM Linux desktop will fail

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: If one was to believe IBM, the days of the Microsoft desktop are numbered, soon to be cut short by a combination of Canonical's Ubuntu Linux, IBM's Lotus range of office applications and a virtual desktop from Virtual Bridges. The trouble is IBM's solution is nothing new and addresses none of the issues associated with moving away from Microsoft.

Get your feet wet before taking the Linux plunge

Filed under
Linux

newsday.com: I recently promised you a strategy for a long-term exploration and transition to Linux and Open Source. This plan is for home use; organizational Linux is another issue. You also can follow this strategy to get some idea of how well a netbook will work before shelling out big bucks.

PCLinuxOS 2009 Beta 2 Thoughts and Screenshots

Filed under
PCLOS

benkevan.com/blog: With all the ranting and raving of PCLinuxOS 2007 I decided to give PCLinuxOS 2009 Beta 2 a shot. I started by downloading and launching the Live CD in a virtual machine.

Phoronix Benchmarking.. Statistically Significant?

Filed under
Linux

kev009.com: Phoronix has been cranking out a slew of benchmarks recently, pitting various different Linux distros against each other and even different operating systems with their own automated test suite. What I would like to know is… are they bullshit?

gcompris: educational suite for children

Filed under
Software

debaday.debian.net: As a parent, have you ever wondered if kids can use FOSS to have fun and learn at the same time? As a teacher, have you ever wondered how to teach using a computer and FOSS tools? The answer is gcompris.

odds & ends

Filed under
News
  • SFLC Receives Grant for Work in India

  • Running Linux on Windows XP
  • Unix and Linux Horror Stories
  • Interviews with teachers about OLPC benefits
  • Arch to Gentoo, back to Arch
  • Codec prevents computers from playing movies and music
  • Unix - System VI Release Notes - More Linux and Unix Humor
  • Netflix comes to Linux desktop
  • tasks widget and multi screen
  • Rotating your adult content
  • Linux Hater’s Redux... dead? Long live... Oiaohm?!
  • The Microsoftie Who Embraced the Dark Side (Open Source)
  • Software Goodies
  • Another Win For Ubuntu

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Repackage i386 deb for in lpia (for Dell Mini9)

  • Redirecting network traffic to a new IP using IPtables
  • Working with multimedia files - Part 3
  • Graduate From A Wubi Install To A Dedicated Partition
  • Search For Movies With Totem
  • Simple Wireless Network Manager in Ubuntu
  • Drupal to Wordpress migration
  • Ubuntu Tweak came to Fedora
  • Customizing Firefox to work faster in netbooks
  • Backup your Firefox Passwords
  • Auto Start Applications at Login to GNOME Desktop
  • Customizing Your Desktop in Ubuntu 8.10

Most Underhyped Apps of 2008

lifehacker.com: Now that you've seen all the big names and launches of 2008, it's time to give a nod to the apps that didn't get the attention they should have this past year.

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More in Tux Machines

NuTyX 10.1-rc1 Available

I'm very please to propose you the first release candidate version of the next version 10.1 stable version of NuTyX As they have been so many security issues, I took the chance to recompile all the collections (1701 packages) for this coming next stable NuTyX version. Read more

Android Leftovers

Events: FOSDEM Samba Talks, USENIX Enigma, LCA (linux.conf.au) and FAST18

  • Authentication and authorization in Samba 4
    Volker Lendecke is one of the first contributors to Samba, having submitted his first patches in 1994. In addition to developing other important file-sharing tools, he's heavily involved in development of the winbind service, which is implemented in winbindd. Although the core Active Directory (AD) domain controller (DC) code was written by his colleague Stefan Metzmacher, winbind is a crucial component of Samba's AD functionality. In his information-packed talk at FOSDEM 2018, Lendecke said he aimed to give a high-level overview of what AD and Samba authentication is, and in particular the communication pathways and trust relationships between the parts of Samba that authenticate a Samba user in an AD environment.
  • Two FOSDEM talks on Samba 4
    Much as some of us would love never to have to deal with Windows, it exists. It wants to authenticate its users and share resources like files and printers over the network. Although many enterprises use Microsoft tools to do this, there is a free alternative, in the form of Samba. While Samba 3 has been happily providing authentication along with file and print sharing to Windows clients for many years, the Microsoft world has been slowly moving toward Active Directory (AD). Meanwhile, Samba 4, which adds a free reimplementation of AD on Linux, has been increasingly ready for deployment. Three short talks at FOSDEM 2018 provided three different views of Samba 4, also known as Samba-AD, and left behind a pretty clear picture that Samba 4 is truly ready for use. I will cover the first two talks in this article, and the third in a later one.
  • A report from the Enigma conference
    The 2018 USENIX Enigma conference was held for the third time in January. Among many interesting talks, three presentations dealing with human security behaviors stood out. This article covers the key messages of these talks, namely the finding that humans are social in their security behaviors: their decision to adopt a good security practice is hardly ever an isolated decision. Security conferences tend to be dominated by security researchers demonstrating their latest exploits. The talks are attack-oriented, they keep a narrow focus, and usually they close with a dark outlook. The security industry has been doing security conferences like this for twenty years and seems to prefer this format. Yet, if you are tired of this style, the annual USENIX Enigma conference is a welcome change of pace. Most of the talks are defense-oriented, they have a horizon going far beyond technology alone, and they are generally focused on successful solutions.
  • DIY biology
    A scientist with a rather unusual name, Meow-Ludo Meow-Meow, gave a talk at linux.conf.au 2018 about the current trends in "do it yourself" (DIY) biology or "biohacking". He is perhaps most famous for being prosecuted for implanting an Opal card RFID chip into his hand; the Opal card is used for public transportation fares in Sydney. He gave more details about his implant as well as describing some other biohacking projects in an engaging presentation. Meow-Meow is a politician with the Australian Science Party, he said by way of introduction; he has run in the last two elections. He founded BioFoundry, which is "Australia's first open-access molecular biology lab"; there are now two such labs in the country. He is also speaks frequently as "an emerging technology evangelist" for biology as well as other topics.
  • Notes from FAST18

    I attended the technical sessions of Usenix's File And Storage Technology conference this week. Below the fold, notes on the papers that caught my attention.

Security: Vista10 and uTorrent Holes Found by Google

  • Google drops new Edge zero-day as Microsoft misses 90-day deadline

    Google originally shared details of the flaw with Microsoft on 17 November 2017, but Microsoft wasn’t able to come up with a patch within Google’s non-negotiable “you have 90 days to do this” period.

  • Google Goes Public with Another Major Windows 10 Bug
    After revealing an Edge browser vulnerability that Microsoft failed to fix, Google is now back with another disclosure, this time aimed at Windows 10 Fall Creators Update (version 1709), but potentially affecting other Windows versions as well. James Forshaw, a security researcher that’s part of Google’s Project Zero program, says the elevation of privilege vulnerability can be exploited because of the way the operating system handles calls to Advanced Local Procedure Call (ALPC). This means a standard user could obtain administrator privileges on a Windows 10 computer, which in the case of an attack, could eventually lead to full control over the impacted system. But as Neowin noted, this is the second bug discovered in the same function, and both of them, labeled as 1427 and 1428, were reported to Microsoft on November 10, 2017. Microsoft said it fixed them with the release of the February 2018 Patch Tuesday updates, yet as it turns out, only issue 1427 was addressed.
  • uTorrent bugs let websites control your computer and steal your downloads

    The vulnerabilities, according to Project Zero, make it possible for any website a user visits to control key functions in both the uTorrent desktop app for Windows and in uTorrent Web, an alternative to desktop BitTorrent apps that uses a web interface and is controlled by a browser. The biggest threat is posed by malicious sites that could exploit the flaw to download malicious code into the Windows startup folder, where it will be automatically run the next time the computer boots up. Any site a user visits can also access downloaded files and browse download histories.

  • BitTorrent Client uTorrent Suffers Security Vulnerability (Updated)

    BitTorrent client uTorrent is suffering from an as yet undisclosed vulnerability. The security flaw was discovered by Google security researcher Tavis Ormandy, who previously said he would reveal a series of "remote code execution flaws" in torrent clients. BitTorrent Inc. has rolled out a 'patch' in the latest Beta release and hopes to fix the stable uTorrent client later this week.