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Sunday, 30 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story Chumby, the Next Generation srlinuxx 25/06/2010 - 4:19pm
Story Become a typeface pro with Fontmatrix srlinuxx 25/06/2010 - 6:24pm
Story Lightworks Switches the Lights On srlinuxx 25/06/2010 - 6:31pm
Story Lucid Lynx boot times - 10 seconds, yes or no? srlinuxx 25/06/2010 - 6:34pm
Story The Stable Triple and Marketing Linux srlinuxx 26/06/2010 - 1:03am
Story Ubuntu Nearing X Server Not Running As Root srlinuxx 26/06/2010 - 1:07am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 26/06/2010 - 3:33am
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 26/06/2010 - 4:55am
Story Linux game-time refined with latest Wine srlinuxx 26/06/2010 - 3:32pm
Story openSUSE Weekly News Issue 129 srlinuxx 26/06/2010 - 3:37pm

Criminalist Testifies That Blood Was Found In Reiser House

Filed under
Reiser

wired blog: Jurors judging the murder trial of Linux guru Hans Reiser were provided a glimpse into the prosecution's forensic evidence -- trace amounts of "nice shiny red" blood found inside the defendant's house -- the last place his wife Nina Reiser was seen alive.

Flock 1.1 beta will add web Email, Picasa and more to your web browser

Filed under
Software

downloadsquad: Social web browser Flock is planning to launch 3 major new features in about two weeks. Like its predecessors, Flock 1.1 beta is built on Firefox code but it has a ton of features that make it easier to keep in touch with your social networking services like Facebook, Flickr, Twitter, and YouTube.

PCLinuxOS 2008 on my ThinkPad T61 - Part 2

Filed under
PCLOS

temporaryland.wordpress: As I mentioned on Part 1 of this review the version of PCLinuxOS I am using is the MiniMe 2008 edition. For those of us that already know what applications we need, the MiniMe edition is actually preferred. It is very easy to install the needed applications from Synaptic.

Also: PCLOS Day 10 - 2008 MiniME Edition Impressions

more Sun MySQL headlines

Filed under
Software
  • A bright future for MySQL

  • Give Me a M: The MySQL/Sun Q&A
  • Sun proves the open market with MySQL
  • $1 Billion and Not a Thing to Wear
  • Sun, MySQL and the return of integrated solutions
  • What do the database deals mean?
  • Open Source Groups Upbeat, Cautious on Sun-MySQL

SSH: Best Practices

Filed under
Linux
Security
HowTos

Are you using SSH in the best way possible? Have you configured it to be as limited and secure as possible? The goal of this document is to kick in the new year with some best practices for SSH: why you should use them, how to set them up, and how to verify that they are in place. All of the examples below assume that you are using EnGarde Secure Linux but any modern Linux distribution will do just fine since, as far as I know, everybody ships OpenSSH.

some shorts

Filed under
News
  • RHEL installation and virtual media “fun”

  • Review of Hardy Heron Alpha
  • How to get your kids started young on Linux
  • GNOME 2.21.5 Development Snapshot
  • John C Dvorak: Sun Buys MySQL — I Think It’s a Disaster

Build a faster desktop with RAID

Filed under
Hardware

linux.com: The evolution of computing is characterized by a vertiginous acceleration of speed and capacity. As we install sophisticated applications and make use of computers in more creative ways, storage needs are pushed even further. You can improve your disk performance by using a RAID-enabled desktop system running common OSS applications.

The OLPC XO laptop

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Reviews

reghardware.co.uk: Originally known as the '$100 laptop' from the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) project, the XO laptop is now available through retail. I bought one under the Give One, Get One program where for a $400 donation, OLPC would send one XO to the donator, and another to a child. This is my story of working with it for a couple of weeks.

more OOXML headlines

Filed under
Microsoft
  • Microsoft bends over backwards to prove there’s an ‘open’ in OOXML

  • Microsoft defends Open XML work
  • OOXML: the propaganda war has begun
  • Microsoft greases OOXML wheels with binary tech specs
  • Microsoft wants open sourcers to write an OOXML translator

Btrfs Online Resizing, Ext3 Conversion, and More

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: Chris Mason announced version 0.10 of his new Btrfs filesystem, listing the following new features, "explicit back references, online resizing (including shrinking), in place conversion from Ext3 to Btrfs, data=ordered support, mount options to disable data COW and checksumming, and barrier support for sata and IDE drives".

Intel's Classmate PC goes on sale to consumers in India

linuxworld (IDG): Intel's Classmate PC isn't just for students anymore. HCL Infosystems plans to sell a version of the Classmate PC to consumers and businesses in India who want a rugged, low-cost laptop.

Also: Wait Just a Minute -- Intel Isn't the Bad Guy Here

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Running VitrualBox (OSE) on OpenSuse 10.3

  • Configuring AWStats on Ubuntu Server
  • Making a bootable backup Debian system disk
  • Numbering in Impress slides
  • Which NIC is eth0?
  • Analyzing web logs with grep

Everex follows Asus Eee to announce 9in sub-notebook

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

reghardware.co.uk: Not content with mounting a serious challenge to Asus' elfin Eee PC, US manufacturer Everex this week said it will follow up its 7in CloudBook sub-notebook with larger models later in the year.

Red Hat and Firefox more buggy than Microsoft?

Filed under
Security

techworld.com: Secunia has found that the number of security bugs in the open source Red Hat Linux operating system and Firefox browsers far outstripped comparable products from Microsoft last year.

OpenOffice.org dismisses pro-OOXML report

Filed under
OOo

zdnet: OpenOffice.org has dismissed an analyst report from Burton Group which claims that Microsoft's Office Open XML document format is preferable to the OpenDocument Format.

Open Document Format Alliance Refutes the Burton Group Report on ODF

Filed under
OSS

Groklaw: The Open Document Format Alliance has released a paper [PDF] refuting the recent Burton Group's Report on ODF and MSOOXML. I asked for and received permission to publish it here on Groklaw.

The reports of Gentoo's death have been greatly exaggerated.

Filed under
Gentoo

mpagano.com: Yes, Gentoo has some issues concerning the Gentoo foundation. Yes, we are actively working on straightening out these issues. No, Gentoo is not dying.

Linux Releases: Fixed vs. Rolling Release

Filed under
Linux

jon-reagan.blogspot: Many distributions have what is called a "fixed" release. While they may have several names for it, it is simply a fixed release where several things happen... The next release type is called a "rolling" release. Possibly the best example of this type of release is PCLinuxOS. I have learned there are pros and cons to each:

Open source web conferencing

Filed under
Software

Tristan Rhodes: Have you ever wanted to attend a webinar but quickly discovered that the web-conference service doesn't even support your operating system? Fortunately for us, there are companies that offer cross-platform support for web-conferencing. Even better, there are a small handful of open source projects that provide the features of a web-conference service.

Mandriva/TurboLinux partnership raises questions

Filed under
Linux

tectonic: The delay in the announcement is particularly interesting, especially for the fact that last October was also the month that Microsoft and TurboLinux entered into a collaboration agreement, complete with the ever-dubious patent agreements.

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Oh Snap – to boldly package where no one has packaged before

One of the great disadvantages of the Linux desktop is its software distribution mechanism. While the overall concept of central software repos works great and has been adapted into powerful Stores in commercial products, deploying and using programs, delivered as packages, is a tricky business. It stems from the wider fragmentation of the distro ecospace, and it essence, it means that if you want to release your product, you must compile it 150 odd ways, not just for different distributions but also for different versions of the same distribution. Naturally, this model scares away the big game. Recently though, there have been several attempts to make Linux packages more cross-distro and minimize the gap between distributions. The name of the game: Snap, and we’ve tasted this app-container framework before. It is unto Linux what, well, Windows stuff is unto Windows, in a way. Not quite statically compiled stuff, but definitely independent. I had it tested again in Ubuntu 17.04, and it would appear that Snap is getting more and more traction. Let’s have another look. Read more

Kubuntu 17.04 - the next generation

As usual, Kubuntu 17.04 does not give you any surprises. It is stable and reliable. It is reasonably resource-hungry. There are no wonders in this new release. Just a well-rounded distribution for everyday use. Yes, there are small bugs or inconveniences here and there, but they are not huge and can be easily fixed, replaced or lived with. The biggest of them for me, of course, is the lack of multimedia codecs. You can heal that easily. Read more

KDE vs. GNOME Design Philosophies

The days are gone when the Linux desktop was dominated almost entirely by KDE and GNOME. However, the influence of their design philosophy remains, with KDE favored by a third of users, and many modern desktop alternatives, from GNOME itself to Linux Mint’s Cinnamon and MATE using applications originally designed for GNOME. Broadly speaking, KDE’s design philosopy can be described as completist, and designed for users of all levels of experience, while GNOME’s is minimalist, and aimed particularly at new users — although all levels of users can appreciate GNOME design as well. By “completist,” I mean that KDE applications try to include every function that could possibly be included in a task. Confusion is limited by the setting of intelligent defaults, but more functions are still visible than most everyday uses require. Perhaps the ultimate example of this design is digiKam, which over the year has calved new windows the way that polar ice caps calve glaciers. At the opposite end of the spectrum, GNOME applications tend to include only the features for the most common use-cases. This choice makes GNOME apps easy to use, but can leave users stranded if any problems emerge. A typical example is Simple Scan, which is so uncluttered that at first it can almost seem confusing. Read more

Kubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zaphod - Kawabuntu!

Let us continue with the spring season distro testing. Next on the menu: Kubuntu. After many years of offering bland, emotionless releases, we had a cautiously reasonable Yakkety Yak edition, so me hopes are high for today. And for today, we will examine the latest Kubuntu, which officially bears the name of Zesty Zapus, but once again, like my recent Ubuntu review, my version of the distro's name is totally better. So allow me to ask thee, what is the answer to Linux, multiverse and constant forking? Read more