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About Tux Machines

Friday, 17 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story Chumby, the Next Generation srlinuxx 25/06/2010 - 4:19pm
Story Become a typeface pro with Fontmatrix srlinuxx 25/06/2010 - 6:24pm
Story Lightworks Switches the Lights On srlinuxx 25/06/2010 - 6:31pm
Story Lucid Lynx boot times - 10 seconds, yes or no? srlinuxx 25/06/2010 - 6:34pm
Story The Stable Triple and Marketing Linux srlinuxx 26/06/2010 - 1:03am
Story Ubuntu Nearing X Server Not Running As Root srlinuxx 26/06/2010 - 1:07am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 26/06/2010 - 3:33am
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 26/06/2010 - 4:55am
Story Linux game-time refined with latest Wine srlinuxx 26/06/2010 - 3:32pm
Story openSUSE Weekly News Issue 129 srlinuxx 26/06/2010 - 3:37pm

Debian @15 is it still relevant?

Filed under
Linux
  • Debian @15 is it still relevant?

  • Debian GNU/Linux: 15 Years Old and at the Crossroads

Take a closer look at OpenBSD 4.3

Filed under
OS

OpenBSD provides a UNIX distribution with a primary emphasis on security and cryptography. If you're looking for a UNIX distribution to deploy in the most critical nexus in your network infrastructure, look no further than OpenBSD. The recent release of OpenBSD—version 4.3—includes several new features and bug fixes that this article reviews.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 266

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: Mandriva Flash 2008.1 on ASUS Eee PC 900

  • News: Slackware tests KDE 4.1, Fedora suffers from update outage, attackers crack LinuxMint.com, interviews with Ubuntu's Scott Remnant and gOS's David Liu, Zypper tips and tricks
  • Released last week: Scientific Linux 5.2 "Live CD/DVD", ClarkConnect 4.3
  • Upcoming releases: Mandriva Linux 2009 Beta 2, openSUSE 11.1 Alpha 2
  • New additions: FaunOS, Inquisitor
  • New distributions: Asterisk on IPCop
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Canonical Joins The Linux Foundation

Filed under
Ubuntu

linux-foundation.org: The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization dedicated to accelerating the growth of Linux, today announced that Canonical has become a member of the Foundation.

Three Firefox extensions for Gmail

Filed under
Moz/FF

linux.com: Gmail, Google's popular Web mail application, is already full of useful features all on its own. But Firefox users can further customize Gmail with a variety of add-ons. Some only change the appearance, while others add functionality that makes Gmail more like a personal planner than just a plain old email application. Let's take a look at three Firefox add-ons for Gmail.

The Linux Kernel

Filed under
Linux

ubuntu.sg: Many refer Linux as an Operating System. Linux is not an Operating System. GNU/Linux is. Linux refers to the Kernel of an Operating System.

Concept Distro

Filed under
Linux

netsplit.com: The Concept Distro would be an engineering project to allow developers and maintainers to let their imaginations run wild. It’d be released, probably to demonstrate at a major event, and would explicitly not be supported.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Improving Font Rendering in Ubuntu

  • openSuse compared after some time
  • Review of CrossOver Linux 7.0.2
  • Git 1.6.0 Released
  • Ubuntu growing its ecosystem of apps, partners, Canonical says
  • Why it’s a bad idea to use Debian Sid for daily use
  • Linux Outlaws 51 - Too Young for Jail

Why would anyone choose Windows over Linux?

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

blogs.techrepublic.com: I am going out on a limb here…really opening myself up for a flame-war. But you know - there are some defining moments that beg for such an action. That action? To question why anyone (when they KNOW the difference) would seriously choose a Windows operating system over Linux.

few more howtos & such

Filed under
HowTos
  • Rotate Desktop Backgrounds in Ubuntu

  • Tip: Hiding Files Inside An Image in Linux
  • Unix and Linux Online Dictionary Shell Script
  • 20 beautiful dark themes for Gnome and Ubuntu

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #104

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu.com: The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #104 for the week of August 10th - August 16th, 2008 is now available. In this Issue: Intrepid Alpha-4 released, Global Bug Jam: Retrospective, and much, much more!

How do Drigg and Pligg compare?

Filed under
Software

freesoftwaremagazine.com: Drigg and Pligg are pieces of software that will allow you to create Digg-like sites. People sometimes ask me if they should pick Drigg or Pligg. When it happens, I am not sure what I should answer. This article will hopefully solve the dilemma for most of them.

People Behind KDE: Michael Pyne

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

kde.org: In the next People Behind KDE interview, we stay in the United States of America to meet a KDE developer who could be a JuKebox in another life, someone who helps you build development versions of KDE - tonight's star of People Behind KDE is Michael Pyne.

Gecko-MediaPlayer

Filed under
Software

fosswire.com: Gecko-MediaPlayer is a custom browser plugin which uses MPlayer and its GNOME bindings to provide a better user interface for playing audio and video inside your browser.

Where is KDE 4.1 in Sabayon Linux?

Filed under
KDE
Linux

joostruis.blogspot: Archlinux has it, Fedora has it, but where is KDE 4.1 on Sabayon Linux? As you know Sabayon Linux depends on Gentoo portage. We use it as our backbone. The KDE team has shrunk desperately lately.

IPTable Rules and Rebooting for Debian / Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

How to create a firewall on Ubuntu the old school way, using iptables.

OpenGEU 8.04 'Luna Crescente' Beta Live CD

Filed under
Linux

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: OpenGEU, previously known as Geubuntu, is described on the project's website as “a complete and fully functional operative (sic) system based on Ubuntu.” What OpenGEU does is blend elements of the GNOME desktop environment, with E17 (E16 is the stable version) and Ubuntu.

The end of Windows as we knew it

Filed under
Microsoft

news.cnet.com: Glyn Moody has written a beautiful eulogy for the Windows desktop of yore, one that I heartily encourage you to read. Moody touches on a range of threats to Microsoft's desktop dominance, and in the process uncovers a rising threat to both Microsoft's desktop dominance and user freedom. The culprit?

My story with Linux, Part 1

Filed under
Linux

tabula0rasa.org: My story with Debian GNU\Linux is a true love story. At least for the time being. This post is dedicated to describe how I got “here”. “Here” is my relationship with Debian on my laptop, and this post will also describe what I can or can’t do with my Debian GNU\Linux and will be like a long going bug report, hopefully this will help someone resolve those bugs with time.

New to Linux? Make sure you bookmark these

Filed under
Linux
Web

binarycodes.blogspot: New users in the Linux/Unix land are often confused and overwhelmed by the marked differences between the OS they come from and Linux. It takes some time gettting used to the new environment and the new way of doing things. While there are scores of material worthy of a mention, in the internet, I list the ones that every new user must bookmark.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Google, Vulnerabilities Equities Process (VEP), Quad9 and More

  • Google investigators find hackers swipe nearly 250,000 passwords a week
    Hackers are constantly trying to break into Google accounts, so Google researchers spent a year tracing how hackers steal passwords and expose them on the internet's black market. To gather hard evidence about the tools hackers use to swipe passwords, Google collaborated with University of California Berkeley cybersecurity experts to track activity on some of these markets. On Thursday, they published their results.
  • Time Will Tell if the New Vulnerabilities Equities Process Is a Step Forward for Transparency
    The White House has released a new and apparently improved Vulnerabilities Equities Process (VEP), showing signs that there will be more transparency into the government’s knowledge and use of zero day vulnerabilities. In recent years, the U.S. intelligence community has faced questions about whether it “stockpiles” vulnerabilities rather than disclosing them to affected companies or organizations, and this scrutiny has only ramped up after groups like the Shadow Brokers have leaked powerful government exploits. According to White House Cybersecurity Coordinator Rob Joyce, the form of yesterday’s release and the revised policy itself are intended to highlight the government’s commitment to transparency because it’s “the right thing to do.”
  • Security updates for Friday
  • Quad9 Secure DNS Service Embeds IBM Security Intelligence
  • New “Quad9” DNS service blocks malicious domains for everyone
    The Global Cyber Alliance (GCA)—an organization founded by law enforcement and research organizations to help reduce cyber-crime—has partnered with IBM and Packet Clearing House to launch a free public Domain Name Service system. That system is intended to block domains associated with botnets, phishing attacks, and other malicious Internet hosts—primarily targeted at organizations that don't run their own DNS blacklisting and whitelisting services. Called Quad9 (after the 9.9.9.9 Internet Protocol address the service has obtained), the service works like any other public DNS server (such as Google's), except that it won't return name resolutions for sites that are identified via threat feeds the service aggregates daily.
  • The Internet of Shit is so manifestly insecure that people are staying away from it in droves
  • Security updates for Thursday
  • [Ubuntu] Security Team Weekly Summary: November 16, 2017
  • Hacking Blockchain with Smart Contracts to Control a Botnet
    Blockchain has been hailed by some in the technology industry as a potential method to help improve cyber security. However, security researcher Majid Malaika warns that Blockchain can potentially be abused to enable a new form of botnet that would be very difficult to take down. Malaika detailed his Blockchain-powered botnet in a session at the SecTor security conference on Nov. 15. The overall attack method has been dubbed "Botract" by Malaika, as it abuses inherent functionality in the smart contracts that help to enable Blockchain.
  • What Can The Philosophy of Unix Teach Us About Security?

Graphics: AMD and NVIDIA

  • R600 Gallium3D Shader Image Support Lands, Other R600g Patches Pending
    As a follow-up to OpenGL 4.2 Support Could Soon Land For AMD Cayman GPUs On R600g, the patches have landed in Mesa 17.4-dev Git! Plus other R600g patches are on the mailing list for review. These shader image support patches for R600g expose OpenGL's ARB_shader_image_size and ARB_shader_image_load_store for Radeon HD 5000/6000 series. In the process, this ends up taking Radeon HD 6900 "Cayman" GPUs to having OpenGL 4.2 compliance from 4.1 with the shader image support having been the last blocker. Other GPUs on R600g remain at OpenGL 3.3 due to lacking FP64 support, as outlined more extensively in that previous article.
  • GeForce GTX 900 Series Re-Clocking Patches Updated By Karol Herbst
    Frequent Nouveau open-source NVIDIA driver contributor Karol Herbst has posted his latest patch series in working towards GeForce GTX 900 "Maxwell 2" graphics processor re-clocking.
  • 25 More AMDGPU DC Patches, Mostly Focused On Raven DCN
    DCN in this context is for current the DCN 1.0 Raven Ridge family of display engines. The just-launched Vega+Zen APUs feature a new display engine and that's what this DCN code is for, which is also under a separate Kconfig tunable from the rest of AMDGPU DC.

Development of Linux 4.15

  • Broadcom Hurricane 2 & Allwinner R40 Supported By Linux 4.15
    More ARM platform upstreaming has taken place for the Linux 4.15 kernel development cycle among other ARM hardware improvements.
  • Intel Coffee Lake & Cannonlake Thermal Support In Linux 4.15
    While Intel Coffee Lake hardware is shipping already, a few bits of tardy kernel code for these "8th Gen Core" CPUs is only hitting the Linux 4.15 kernel. The Intel DRM driver is most notably enabling Coffee Lake graphics by default in 4.15, but there's also some thermal code now landing among other changes now happening. Zhang Rui sent in the thermal updates for Linux 4.15 on Thursday and they include late additions for Coffee Lake but at the same time the relevant additions for Cannonlake that will be shipping in 2018 as the next-gen Intel CPUs.
  • AMDGPU DC Pull Request Submitted For Linux 4.15 Kernel - 132,395 Lines Of Code
    One day after submitting the main DRM feature pull request for Linux 4.15, David Airlie of Red Hat has submitted the secondary pull request that would feature the long-awaited introduction of AMDGPU DC into the mainline kernel.

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