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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 27 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story Fun stats from Ubuntu Manual Project srlinuxx 26/06/2010 - 10:25pm
Story New Releases Of GNOME Shell, Mutter srlinuxx 26/06/2010 - 10:27pm
Story Moving to Linux srlinuxx 26/06/2010 - 10:30pm
Story Locking Down Linux: Is it Necessary? srlinuxx 26/06/2010 - 10:33pm
Story On the Brokenness of File Locking srlinuxx 26/06/2010 - 10:34pm
Story AWN vs Cairo Dock vs Docky srlinuxx 26/06/2010 - 10:36pm
Story today's howtos & leftovers: srlinuxx 27/06/2010 - 3:16am
Story Using the Mint Menu in Ubuntu 10.04 mcasperson 27/06/2010 - 4:04am
Story Firefox 3.6.6 now available for download srlinuxx 27/06/2010 - 4:19pm
Story full circle magazine issue #38! srlinuxx 27/06/2010 - 4:21pm

The Tale of the Accidental Upgrade

Filed under
Linux

bmc blogs: An old friend here at the office was working late, and I was there working on IT360/Linuxworld. He dropped by my designated work area, and we got to talking about Linux. He was asking (in essence) why I like Linux. The reason he was asking was that he had tried to install SUSE as his first Linux.

Exploring the /etc directory: inittab

ITtoolbox blogs: In this series I am going to be travelling around the /etc directory on a linux installation and explaining what some of those cryptically named files do. In these cases I will be using Kubuntu/Ubuntu as an example but the files I will explain will generally be present in all distributions. The first file I will cover is the "inittab" file.

Digital World: Linux's big moment

Filed under
Linux

the jerusalem post: While Linux is an alternative to Windows, it is not cheap Windows. Linux has its own strengths, and users should want it because of those strengths and not because it's a cheap copy of Windows."

What is stopping SMB adoption of GNU/Linux?

Filed under
Linux

Free Software Mag: When considering moving a Small to Mid-size Business (SMB) client over to GNU/Linux or talking to someone who is considering the same, there frequently is a “but” somewhere during the process. The hesitation is one that is rarely talked about, or one that I have rarely heard; the lack of specialized applications from Independent Software Vendors.

Promise Kept: Sun Delivers Open Source Java

Filed under
Software

internetnews.com: Sun Microsystems today will announce it's released a fully buildable Java Development Kit (JDK) for Java Platform Standard Edition (Java SE) under the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2. Sun is planning a formal announcement today at its JavaOne conference in San Francisco.

The State of Ubuntu 7.04 Is Strong

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

eWeek: Ubuntu 7.04—also known as Feisty Fawn—shines for its excellent software management tools and large catalog of ready-to-install free software applications.

Lawyer Causes Delay In Hans Reiser Trial

Filed under
Reiser

nbc11.com: The trial of computer programmer Hans Reiser on charges that he murdered his wife Nina Reiser was delayed for three weeks today because his lawyer is busy with another case.

Dell's Linux Problem

Filed under
Linux

Forbes: Dell became a hero to Linux fans worldwide when it announced last week that it would begin selling PCs loaded with the Linux operating system instead of Microsoft's Windows. But a week later Dell may have blown that good will away.

6 biggest wins for Linux in Q1 2007

Filed under
Linux

Seopher: I wrote on New Years day that 2006 was not a lost year for Linux and most people happily agreed. It's May now so we've had a third of the year so how has the situation progressed? Well, it's all good news.

Linux Kernel Launches Hardware Management Features

Filed under
Linux

LinuxPlanet: The 2.6 Linux kernel has been one amazing roller-coaster ride of excellent new features and changes coming faster than you can say "git along now, little patchies." Hardware detection and management, and removable media management are probably the most obvious changes to users.

Extend OpenOffice.org

Filed under
OOo
HowTos

LinuxJournal: If you have a nifty macro or a nice Writer template you want to share with other OpenOffice.org users, publishing them on the Web along with detailed installation instructions is probably not the best way to go. Fortunately, OpenOffice.org supports extensions-small installable packages that provide added functionality.

Gentoo Linux 2007.0 released

After several delays, the Gentoo Release Engineering team is proud to announce the release of Gentoo Linux 2007.0, code named "Secret Sauce". This release includes a completely rewritten version of the Gentoo Linux Installer on the AMD64 and x86 LiveCD and LiveDVD images. It also includes GNOME 2.16.2, KDE 3.5.5, Xfce 4.4, Mozilla Firefox 2.0.0.3, OpenOffice.org 2.1.0, and the 2.6.19 Linux kernel.

KDE Commit-Digest for 6th May 2007

Filed under
KDE

dot.kde.org: In this week's KDE Commit-Digest: Atlantik, KFouleggs, Klickety, KPoker, Kenolaba, KAsteroids, KSnake, KSokoban, KJumpingCube and KTron move to playground/games. KDE 3.90.1 (KDE Alpha 1) is tagged to be released.

Create CD / DVD database Labels in OpenOffice.Org under Linux

Filed under
OOo
HowTos

nixcraft: If you’re serious about music or DVDs, at some point you cross the threshold of having more than you can keep track of easily. The box full of index cards has served its purpose; it’s time to move on to storing information about your CDs and DVDs in a database.

The KDE 3.5 Control Center - Part 6 - Power Control

Filed under
KDE

Raiden's Realm: Welcome to part 6 of our series on the KDE 3.5 Control Center. Today we'll be covering the Power Control section of the Control Center. This area is most important to laptop users.

How to kill open source

Filed under
OSS

Dana Blankenhorn: The use of lawyers to go after open source frontally, with copyright and patents, has not worked, so many in the open source community are under the mistaken impression that the war is over and they won.

Extending OpenOffice.org: Creating template and AutoText extensions

Filed under
OOo
HowTos

Linux.com: One of the great features of the current version of OpenOffice.org is the support for extensions, which allow you to add to the office suite's functionality. Every day this week we'll look some of the most useful OOo extensions available. Today, we'll look at ways you can improve the way the office suite handles templates and AutoText.

Interview with Michael Meeks of OpenOffice.org

Filed under
Interviews
OOo

TuxDelux: On the Novell website, there is a page dedicated to the company's Distinguished Engineers. One of these is Michael Meeks. Daniel James met him just prior to the announcement of the Novell/Microsoft agreement, and opened the interview with his favourite opening question to any free software hacker...

Add the Trash Can Icon to Your Ubuntu Desktop

Filed under
HowTos

How-to-Geek: Ubuntu has an option for adding a Trash Can icon to the desktop, which might be a comfort for those of you migrating from Windows.

Creating Flash Animations on Linux - part 1

Filed under
HowTos

Pegnuin Pete: It's all well and good that Adobe did get the Flash plug-in for Firefox/Linux going, but what we don't (and perhaps will never) have is an Adobe-supported way to create Flash animations on a Linux box.

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Linux and Open Source Hardware for IoT

Most of the new 21 open source software projects for IoT that we examined last week listed Linux hacker boards as their prime development platforms. This week, we’ll look at open source and developer-friendly Linux hardware for building Internet of Things devices, from simple microcontroller-based technology to Linux-based boards. In recent years, it’s become hard to find an embedded board that isn’t marketing with the IoT label. Yet, the overused term is best suited for boards with low prices, small footprints, low power consumption, and support for wireless communications and industrial interfaces. Camera support is useful for some IoT applications, but high-end multimedia is usually counterproductive to attributes like low cost and power consumption. Read more

Fedora 24 -- The Best Distro for DevOps?

If you have been to any DevOps-focused conferences -- whether it’s OpenStack Summit or DockerCon -- you will see a sea of MacBooks. Thanks to its UNIX base, availability of Terminal app and Homebrew, Apple hardware is extremely popular among DevOps professionals. What about Linux? Can it be used as a platform by developers, operations, and DevOps pros? Absolutely, says Major Hayden, Principal Architect at Rackspace, who used to be a Mac OS user and has switched to Fedora. Hayden used Mac OS for everything: software development and operations. Mac OS has all the bells and whistles that you need on a consumer operating system; it also allows software professionals to get the job done. But developers are not the target audience of Mac OS. They have to make compromises. “It seemed like I had to have one app that would do one little thing and this other app would do another little thing,” said Hayden. Read more

Today in Techrights

GitHub open-sources internal load-balancing software

GitHub will release as open source the GitHub Load Balancer (GLB), its internally developed load balancer. GLB was originally built to accommodate GitHub’s need to serve billions of HTTP, Git, and SSH connections daily. Now the company will release components of GLB via open source, and it will share design details. Read more