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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 22 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story Mozilla: 2 billion Firefox add-ons downloaded srlinuxx 03/07/2010 - 2:13am
Story One Stop Shop for Ubuntu Customizations srlinuxx 03/07/2010 - 2:16am
Story The tech behind my comedy troupe. srlinuxx 03/07/2010 - 2:19am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 03/07/2010 - 3:54am
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 03/07/2010 - 4:25am
Story How to install an application in Ubuntu? dancairns 03/07/2010 - 8:41am
Story Libre Graphics Magazine #0 srlinuxx 03/07/2010 - 3:44pm
Story GIMP 2.7.1 Officially Announced srlinuxx 03/07/2010 - 3:51pm
Story 5 Wallpapers that ain't flowers srlinuxx 03/07/2010 - 3:52pm
Story 8 of the Best Free Linux Twitter Clients srlinuxx 03/07/2010 - 3:53pm

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • The 10 most useful Linux commands

  • Stop Compiz-Fusion From Loading Automatically
  • Python: Manipulate string or binary bytes with StringIO
  • Guide to Ubuntu Linux for Windows Users
  • Enable Medibuntu in Ubuntu 8.10
  • Less is more in modern X
  • 8 Ways to get help with Ubuntu Linux
  • Interrogating a Linux Machine
  • Cifs problem in Gentoo
  • TiddlyWiki derivatives help you get things done
  • Triple your audio volume in MPlayer
  • Quick And Easy Local Filesystem Troubleshooting For SUSE Linux
  • Testing the Linux Waters - Live CD vs Dual Boot
  • How to hide or protect folders in Ubuntu linux

Workrave: Useful or Useless?

Filed under
Software

junauza.com: Workrave is a free and open source software application aimed at computer users who are suffering from occupational diseases such as Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI) and carpal tunnel syndrome.

Three applications for making disc labels

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Making labels for DVDs and their cases is an often overlooked task. Many discs are lucky to have some terse information quickly scrawled on them after burning. But there are some fine open source applications available for creating labels for CD-ROM and DVD disks and printing jewel case inserts.

little bit more fedora

Filed under
Linux
  • Fedora Screenshots

  • Video: Spotlight on Network Manager
  • Fedora does FIPS
  • Fedora 10 mini-review

The Samsung NC 10 Running Ubuntu Linux 8.10

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

tuxvaio.blogspot: This little marvel runs Ubuntu 8.10 in very much the same way as the Aspire One runs on Hardy Heron. A couple of things need tweaking however.

Mozilla eyes extra beta for Firefox 3.1

Filed under
Moz/FF

computerworld.com: Mozilla Corp. will probably add a third beta to the development schedule for Firefox 3.1 to get a better handle on remaining bugs and give several new features.

more fedora stuff

Filed under
Linux
  • Fedora 10 Review, and Feature Roundup

  • Rock-solid Fedora 10 brings salvation to Ubuntu weary
  • Red Hat's winning Fedora 10 Linux arrives
  • Security Breach Can't Halt Fedora 10's Debut
  • Fedora 10 Upgrade

Nine awesome computer ads from the 70s and 80s

Filed under
Misc

royal.pingdom.com: There are lots of vintage ad collections out there, and it’s always a fun to look through them. For your viewing pleasure, we have handpicked nine of the most fun, creative or just plain weird computer ads we have ever seen.

Worsed than damned lies?

Filed under
Linux

frields.org/~paul: A word about statistics: Fedora continues to be completely open and transparent about the ways we gather statistics and the ways we present them. We don’t document these statistics for purposes of competition, but because we believe our community and our sponsors are invested and interested in knowing some of the end results of the work they do in Fedora.

Why there are over 2 dozen music players

Filed under
Software

ericsbinaryworld.com/blog: People often groan when they hear of someone making another game of Tetris, Window Manager, or audio program. After all, people ask, “Do we really need another? Why can’t you just contribute to fixing annoying bug X in gTetris/KDE/xmms?” I’ve always been on the side of the argument that said - “So what! But why create another?

The LXF Test: Hands on with Fedora 10

Filed under
Linux

linuxformat.co.uk: Fedora 10 has just been released to the waiting masses. Andy Hudson takes the distro for an early test run, exploring the new features and seeing how it stacks up against the other major players in the Linux league...

Also: Upgrading to the newest Fedora release

More Ubuntu Kung Fu

Filed under
Ubuntu

lifehacker.com: Say hey again to Keir Thomas, author of the new book Ubuntu Kung Fu, who stopped by to share some more of the best material from the book, in a follow-up to his post, Some Productive Ubuntu Kung Fu.

Migrating to Linux in a business or large user environment

Filed under
Linux

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: Every once in a while we see discussions on the method and manner of migrating from one Operating System to Linux.

Martin's hidden blog ;-)

Filed under
Linux

beranger.org: Hopefully Martin won't get upset because of this post, but reading Changelogs is sometimes funnier, bolder and more informative than reading a blog!

No accounting software for Linux?

Filed under
OSS

zdnet.com/Murphy: There is no OSS accounting… solutions worth a hoot. This is the main reason we still run so many Windows machines in the office. Of course this is the main drawback of any OSS adoption. There is a serious lack of good applications.

Yet Another "10 Useful Forefox Extensions"

Filed under
Moz/FF

YATS, Yet Another Technology Site: You have read such posts again & again... So read Yet Another!

Clone/Back Up/Restore OpenVZ VMs With vzdump

Filed under
HowTos

vzdump is a backup and restore utility for OpenVZ VMs. This tutorial shows how you can use it to clone/back up/restore virtual machines with vzdump.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Gentoo recruiting randomness

  • Switching from FrontPage to KompoZer
  • Red Hat offers Linux-wary Unix shops long-term support in Japan
  • 8,000 TuxTop models and counting
  • Collaborative Effort Helps Linux "Distros" Obtain IPv6 Certification
  • Can adoption of GNU/Linux help recession?
  • Linux hops on STD bus
  • Open source Untangle guard union's privacy
  • Are you sure you don’t just want to use Ubuntu?
  • DataForm adds efficient input to OpenOffice.org Calc
  • Disney using Drupal
  • Interview with Dustin Kirkland: Ubuntu Server Developer
  • Is the era of open source legal stupidity over?
  • The problem with dual licensing
  • One More Reason for Linux Lovers to Give Thanks
  • Thumbs up for Ubuntu 8.10
  • Robotic arm runs Linux

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Get to the root of Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Prelinking
  • OOo: Simple Labels
  • Installing PHP cairo wrapper under Mandriva 2009.0
  • Building an OpenBSD Gateway - Part 2
  • Debug your shell scripts with bashdb
  • password protect OpenOffice.org documents
  • Check Package Dependencies with apt-rdepends on Ubuntu
  • Better Firefox in KDE4
  • Minimize All Your Applications To The System Tray In Ubuntu
  • Receive Large Files with Droopy
  • Getting Started with Linux
  • Vi mode in bash

What’s a Document?

redmonk.com: One of the most interesting byproducts of the transition, fully underway around the world, to XML based document formats from binary alternatives, is the ability to treat the asset as a container of items rather than a discrete item itself.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Comment: Many happy returns to open source
    Twenty years ago the phrase “open source” was first used and the development of software – and hardware – was changed forever. Very few designers today will not use some element of open source software in their development projects.
  • Percona Unveils Full Conference Session Schedule for the Annual Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2018
  • Worth seeing in Barcelona: Open source for white box vRAN solutions
    News this week from cloud and carrier infrastructure platform company Kontron builds on our earlier coverage of the emerging virtual radio access network (vRAN); a promising technology that could help the evolution to 5G by maximising available bandwidth while lowering costs. The market for open vRAN solutions is gaining wider acceptance as operators seek more cost-effective approaches to network architectures and deployment. According to analyst firm Research and Markets, the growth of the vRAN market is expected to grow at a CAGR of approximately 125 per cent during the next three years.
  • Barcelona is the first city council to join the FSFE's "Public Money? Public Code!" campaign
  • Earlham Institute releases open source software to help identify gene families
    Researchers at Earlham Institute (EI) have released ‘GeneSeqToFamily’, an open-source Galaxy workflow that helps scientists to find gene families based on the ‘EnsemblCompara GeneTrees’ pipeline. Published in Gigascience, the open source Galaxy workflow aims to make researchers job of finding find gene families much easier.
  • 3 reasons to say 'no' in DevOps
    DevOps, it has often been pointed out, is a culture that emphasizes mutual respect, cooperation, continual improvement, and aligning responsibility with authority. Instead of saying no, it may be helpful to take a hint from improv comedy and say, "Yes, and..." or "Yes, but...". This opens the request from the binary nature of "yes" and "no" toward having a nuanced discussion around priority, capacity, and responsibility.
  • 5 rules for having genuine community relationships
    As I wrote in the first article of this three-part series on the power and importance of communities, building a community of passionate and committed members is difficult. When we launched the NethServer community, we realized early that to play the open source game, we needed to follow the open source rules. No shortcuts. We realized we had to convert the company in an open organization and start to work out in the open.
  •  
  • Rust Typestates
    A long time ago, the Rust language was a language with typestate. Officially, typestates were dropped long before Rust 1.0. In this entry, I’ll get you in on the worst kept secret of the Rust community: Rust still has typestates.
  • It's Time To Do CMake Right
    Not so long ago I got the task of rethinking our build system. The idea was to evaluate existing components, dependencies, but most importantly, to establish a superior design by making use of modern CMake features and paradigms. Most people I know would have avoided such enterprise at all costs, but there is something about writing find modules that makes my brain release endorphins. I thought I was up for an amusing ride. Boy was I wrong.

OpenBSD Gets Mitigated For Meltdown CPU Vulnerability

  • OpenBSD Gets Mitigated For Meltdown CPU Vulnerability
    A few days back FreeBSD 11 stable was mitigated for Meltdown (and Spectre vulnerabilities), which came more than one month after these nasty CPU vulnerabilities were disclosed while DragonFlyBSD was quickly mitigated and the first of the BSDs to do so. While OpenBSD is known for its security features and focus, only today did it land its initial Meltdown mitigation.
  • Meltdown fix committed by guenther@

    Meltdown mitigation is coming to OpenBSD. Philip Guenther (guenther@) has just committed a diff that implements a new mitigation technique to OpenBSD: Separation of page tables for kernel and userland. This fixes the Meltdown problems that affect most CPUs from Intel. Both Philip and Mike Larkin (mlarkin@) spent a lot of time implementing this solution, talking to various people from other projects on best approaches.

    In the commit message, Philip briefly describes the implementation [...]

France Proposes Software Security Liability For Manufacturers, Open Source As Support Ends

It sometimes seems as though barely a week can go by without yet another major software-related hardware vulnerability story. As manufacturers grapple with the demands of no longer building simple appliances but instead supplying them containing software that may expose itself to the world over the Internet, we see devices shipped with insecure firmware and little care for its support or updating after the sale. The French government have a proposal to address this problem that may be of interest to our community, to make manufacturers liable for the security of a product while it is on the market, and with the possibility of requiring its software to be made open-source at end-of-life. In the first instance it can only be a good thing for device security to be put at the top of a manufacturer’s agenda, and in the second the ready availability of source code would present reverse engineers with a bonanza. Read more

today's howtos