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Thursday, 05 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Novell CTO defends 'unstable' Xen claims

Filed under
SUSE

Novell chief technology officer (CTO) Markus Rex has hit back at criticism the company included an "unstable" Xen virtualisation environment in its new Linux server, pointing to support from hardware partners.

KDE-Edu Birds of a Feather Session at aKademy 2006

Filed under
KDE

This year in Dublin will host the annual meeting of the KDE community, and it will be a great occasion for developers to meet, code, hold bug-fixing sessions, discussions and much more.

Sabayon Linux RC2: First Look

Filed under
Linux

The distro formally known as RR4 is soon to be released, and we have taken a hard first look at what's being offered. Based on Gentoo, Sabayon already has a solid base. Add superb Live DVD functionality and a complete installer, this is one distro worth watching.

Ubuntu update fixes Dapper bugs

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu team today released Ubuntu 6.06.1 LTS, the first maintenance release of Dapper Drake. This release includes over 300 updates that have been applied to the OS since its original release on June 1.

Why i love Drupal so much

Filed under
Drupal

I'm still very new to Drupal and at the start of the rocky learning curve i had to confess to questioning my journey with this CMS.

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Freespire 1.0: first impressions

Filed under
Reviews

Freespire 1.0, the community edition of the Linspire distro, was released to the world a few days ago. Sporting out-the-box support for various codecs and features not normally included in free-to-download Linux distros, it could have a big impact in the Linux world. But how does it stack up?

Also: Freespire's Early Delivery

Linux OS "just as bloated as Windows"

Filed under
Linux

A WEB SITE has launched into an attack on the 15 year old Linux in a tirade which puts the attack on James I in the shade.

Bringing a Linux box to Work - Part 2

Filed under
PCLOS

Part 2 in the series of articles that details my experiences in using a Linux box in a Microsoft enviroment. Day 1:

On Monday morning, I packed up my spare PC with a freshly installed copy of PCLinuxOS MiniMe 0.93, put it in the car, and took it to work with me.

Novell Renames Community Linux Distribution 'openSUSE'

Filed under
SUSE

Novell today announced simplified branding to make it even easier for customers to identify the right Linux* product for their needs. SUSE® Linux, Novell's award- winning community Linux distribution, will now be known as "openSUSE(TM)," echoing the name of the Novell-sponsored open source Linux project, openSUSE.org. Novell's enterprise Linux products will continue to be designated "SUSE Linux Enterprise."

Call for nominations for the 2006 FSF Award for the Advancement of Free Software

Filed under
OSS

The Free Software Foundation (FSF) and the GNU Project announce the request for nominations for the 2006 Award for the Advancement of Free Software. This annual award is presented to a person who has made a great contribution to the progress and development of free software, through activities that accord with the spirit of software freedom (as defined in the Free Software Definition).

Book review: The Linux® Kernel Primer: A Top-Down Approach for x86 and PowerPC Architectures

Filed under
Reviews

The Linux Kernel Primer is a top down, C biased, project orientated story of how the Linux kernel works. With a little knowledge of C and a rough understanding of Linux basics, this book will lead you to a clear understanding of the kernel.

Open Source vs. Open Standards Telephony

Filed under
OSS

The focus of open source development at large is solving pragmatic problems. Many developers turn to open source because of frustrations they've experienced in working with proprietary technologies. Open source provides a level of flexibility that proprietary platforms cannot offer because they, like so many open standards platforms, require complicated implementations to achieve simple applications.

Intel 2006-08-09 Graphics Preview

Filed under
Reviews

Making news this afternoon is the release of Intel's next-generation graphics driver. This Linux display driver is open-source and supports all of the integrated graphics adapters from the i810 to the new i965 Express. As we were only alerted to these happening shortly in advance, we only have a few thoughts to share at this time.

Tip of the Trade: Knockd

Filed under
HowTos

Port-knocking has long been kicked around as a nearly fool-proof tactic for keeping intruders out of the network, while unfailingly allowing only legitimate connections. It works like this: The "secret knock" daemon listens on a network interface for a specific sequence of "knocks," or port hits. The client "knocks" by sending TCP or UDP packets to certain ports on the server. You don't need to leave any ports open for this work, because the daemon listens at the link-layer level. When the "secret knock" daemon detects the correct sequence of port hits, opens a port, and allows incoming traffic.

Managing users in Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

As you notice from day to day use of Ubuntu, most tasks are easily accomplished. But what happens when you’re ready to expand your use of Ubuntu to include new applications, or connect to a home network and add new users?

Transgaming discusses problems (for Cedega) with ATI face to face

Filed under
Gaming

It seems as though Transgaming might have an ace up their sleeves to keep existing Transgamers and maybe even win back some. Quotes from the Transgaming Newsletter and development report:

Printing Avery labels with Linux

Filed under
HowTos

To aid users in the task of label printing, Avery Dennison offers a host of free (to download) software, including a program for the Mac released late last month. Linux still isn't supported, but that's no matter -- there's more than one open source application for Linux that lets you format text for printing on the whole universe of Avery labels, from DVD covers to business cards. Here's a look at them.

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Intel aims for open-source graphics advantage

Filed under
OSS

Intel has released open-source software to give Linux full-fledged support for 3D graphics, a move that could give its graphics chips a leg up over rivals.

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Android Leftovers

“LEDE” OpenWrt fork promises greater openness

A “Linux Embedded Development Environment” (LEDE) fork of the lightweight, router-oriented OpenWrt Linux distribution vows greater transparency and inclusiveness. Some core developers of the OpenWrt community has forked off into a Linux Embedded Development Environment (LEDE) group. LEDE is billed as both a “reboot” and “spinoff” of the lightweight, router-focused distribution that aims to build an open source embedded Linux distro that “makes it easy for developers, system administrators or other Linux enthusiasts to build and customize software for embedded devices, especially wireless routers.” Read more