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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 23 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Mandriva Assembly Cooker Chef for Translation Says “Hi!”

  • All in one Peer-to-Peer File-Sharing Program for OpenSuse
  • DBAN via PXE: Automagically Wipe a Drive via Network Boot
  • PAM configuration files
  • Get your machines IP address
  • PIDA: the Python Integrated Development Application
  • Vector rendering with Blender in Ubuntu
  • New KDE Four Live-CDs
  • Easy live upgrade from 11.0 to 11.1
  • German Dell Shop with Strange Ubuntu Logo
  • Fixing a Firefox user profile, and Foxmarks
  • My experience with Linux, especially Ubuntu
  • Remove Bluetooth from Ubuntu
  • VIDE (Vim with Qt Creator’s Quick Browse and more…)
  • Mdadm Cheat Sheet
  • The Linux killer 10 inch netbook

Linux saves the day: why every good toolkit should have Linux

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: No matter if you're exclusively a Windows shop, every good IT technician needs Linux in their toolkit. A bootable Linux CD has saved my bacon more than once.

Hands-on with Mozilla Labs' new tab prototypes

Filed under
Moz/FF

arstechnica.com: Mozilla Labs has released an experimental Firefox extension that brings new functionality to blank tab pages.

Plymouth Packages For Ubuntu Are Now Available

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Last November we learned that Plymouth would replace USplash in Ubuntu. However, for those not interested in trying out Fedora to see Red Hat's Plymouth, there is a package repository of Plymouth packages for Ubuntu available.

Getting Things Gnome! 0.1 - "Just 5 minutes more"

Filed under
Software

frimouvy.org: Bertrand and I are very proud to announce you the first release of Getting Thing Gnome!, a personal organizer and todo list manager for the GNOME desktop.

'Firefox Web Developer' is a hidden security gem

Filed under
Moz/FF

techtarget.com.au: Have you ever come across a situation where you've needed a tool but didn't think you had the right one to get the job done? Like when you're trying to change a smoke detector battery or tighten a loose door knob -- it seems as if the tool you need is never handy.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #132

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #132 for the week of March 1st- March 7th, 2009 is now available.

Where Are All The Linux Netbooks?

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com/blogs: I've read almost a dozen articles in the past week about Netbook computers and am sorely disappointed with some of the news about them. The general consensus is that Windows dominates the Netbook space.

How Linux Can Finally Rise Above Microsoft

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techrepublic.com: Recently I had a chat with another member of the Linux media about what Linux really needs to do in order to finally reach the masses. The conclusion?

Quick fixes for common Linux problems

Filed under
HowTos

techradar.com: We'll come right out and say this – Linux breaks. No matter how much we might like our chosen distro, there is no denying that things can go wrong. So here's our guide to dealing with some of the most common problems, and some advice on how to deal.

Desktop Linux - Felicia Failed in My Office

Filed under
Linux

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: After much discussion my CEO agreed to deploy Linux in our Content Department. Next, the issue on the table was which distribution to deploy.

MSFT vs TomTom: The Q&A

redmonk.com: While it’s true that you hear it here last, generally, a week is a bit much, even for me. But as we’re still fielding questions about the news that Microsoft had filed a complaint over alleged infringed patents against TomTom, Dutch manufacturer of navigation systems, it seems necessary to comment.

Ubuntu is based on Debian unstable

Filed under
Ubuntu

mdzlog.wordpress: From time to time, I see someone remark that Ubuntu uses packages from Debian unstable, and that they don’t think this is a very good idea. I would like to explain why we do this and how it works, and hope that this will enable a less one-sided view of the subject.

Open source microbloggers you should follow

Filed under
OSS

tuxradar.com: If you're a fan of Identi.ca or Twitter and want to follow the alpha geeks of the free sofware world, we've put together a list of people to make it easy for you to find them.

Three Easy Steps to Set-up Anonymous Web Browsing on Linux

Filed under
HowTos

junauza.com: This simple guide will enable you to surf the web anonymously while using Firefox on Linux. But to do this, you will need to install these two important tools.

Qimo, Linux 4 Kids

Filed under
Linux

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: WHAT is a good age to introduce children to Linux/Free Open Source Software? My children are nine, and they regularly use FOSS without actually realising it or, I suspect, caring.

When the Linux missionaries come a-callin

Filed under
Linux

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: No one is a bigger fan of Linux more than I. I am sold on it lock, stock and barrel. However, There is liking Linux, encouraging people to try Linux and then there are the Linux missionaries for whom Linux has become a religion.

Freedom vs. Control

Filed under
OSS

mr-oss.com: The lack of Linux tools which can modify enterprise wide linux deployments is helping to slow it's adoption. Linux philosophy is based around freedom from the control. The control is in the hands of the user and the enterprise administer is left out in the cold.

U.S. Schools: Not Ready For Linux

Filed under
Linux

beginlinux.wordpress: US schools are not yet ready for Linux. Yes sad to say, it is not because they can’t do Linux or don’t need a feasible, safe and renewable source for technology. US schools are not ready to accept Linux because they don’t feel the need.

How to run a successful Linux User Group

Filed under
Linux

techradar.com: If there was one thing Linux Format magazine learned from the Readers' Round Table event it organised, it was that us Linux folk like to get out and have a good chat.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation on Value of GNU/Linux Skills

  • Jobs Report: Rapid Growth in Demand for Open-Source Tech Talent
    The need for open-source technology skills are on the rise and companies and organizations continue to increase their recruitment of open-source technology talent, while offering additional training and certification opportunities for existing staff in order to fill skills gaps, according to the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report, released today by The Linux Foundation and Dice. 87% of hiring managers report difficulty finding open-source talent, and nearly half (48%) report their organizations have begun to support open-source projects with code or other resources for the explicit reason of recruiting individuals with those software skills. After a hiatus, Linux skills are back on top as the most sought after skill with 80% of hiring managers looking for tech professionals with Linux expertise. 55% of employers are now also offering to pay for employee certifications, up from 47% in 2017 and only 34% in 2016.
  • Market value of open source skills on the up
    The demand for open source technology skills is soaring, however, 87% of hiring managers report difficulty finding open source talent, according to the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report which was released this week.
  • SD Times news digest: Linux Foundation releases open-source jobs report, Android Studio 3.2 beta and Rust 1.27
    The Linux Foundation in collaboration with Dice.com has revealed the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report. The report is designed to examine trends in open-source careers as well as find out which skills are the most in demand. Key findings included 83 percent of hiring managers believes hiring open source talent is a priority and Linux is the most in-demand open-source skill. In addition, 57 percent of hiring managers are looking for people with container skills and many organizations are starting to get more involved in open-source in order to attract developers.

GNU/Linux Servers as Buzzwords: "Cloud" and "IaaS"

  • Linux: The new frontier of enterprise in the cloud
    Well obviously, like you mentioned, we've been a Linux company for a long time. We've really seen Linux expand along the lines of a lot of the things that are happening in the enterprise. We're seeing more and more enterprise infrastructure become software centric or software defined. Red Hat's expanded their portfolio in storage, in automation with the Ansible platform. And then the really big trend lately with Linux has been Linux containers and technologies like [Google] Cooper Netties. So, we're seeing enterprises want to build new applications. We're seeing the infrastructure be more software defined. Linux ends up becoming the foundation for a lot of the things going on in enterprise IT these days.
  • Why next-generation IaaS is likely to be open source
    This is partly down to Kubernetes, which has done much to popularise container technology, helped by its association with Docker and others, which has ushered in a period of explosive innovation in the ‘container platform’ space. This is where Kubernetes stands out, and today it could hold the key to the future of IaaS.

Ubuntu: Snapcraft, Intel, AMD Patches, and Telemetry

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Snapcraft
    Canonical, the company behind operating system and Linux distribution Ubuntu, is looking to help developers package, distribute and update apps for Linux and IoT with its open-source project Snapcraft. According to Evan Dandrea, engineering manager at Canonical, Snapcraft “is a platform for publishing applications to an audience of millions of Linux users.” The project was initially created in 2014, but recently underwent rebranding efforts.
  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Now Certified on Select Intel NUC Mini PCs and Boards for IoT Development, LibreOffice 6.0.5 Now Available, Git 2.8 Released and More
    Canonical yesterday announced that Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is certified on select Intel NUC Mini PCs and boards for IoT development. According to the Ubuntu blog post, this pairing "provides benefits to device manufacturers at every stage of their development journey and accelerates time to market." You can download the certified image from here. In other Canonical news, yesterday the company released a microcode firmware update for Ubuntu users with AMD processors to address the Spectre vulnerability, Softpedia reports. The updated amd64-microcode packages for AMD CPUs are available for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), "all AMD users are urged to update their systems."
  • Canonical issues Spectre v2 fix for all Ubuntu systems with AMD chips
    JUST WHEN YOU THOUGHT YOU'D HEARD THE END of Spectre, Canonical has released a microcode update for all Ubuntu users that have AMD processors in a bid to rid of the vulnerability. The Spectre microprocessor side-channel vulnerabilities were made public at the beginning of this year, affecting literally billions of devices that had been made in the past two decades.
  • A first look at desktop metrics
    We first announced our intention to ask users to provide basic, not-personally-identifiable system data back in February. Since then we have built the Ubuntu Report tool and integrated it in to the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS initial setup tool. You can see an example of the data being collected on the Ubuntu Report Github page.

Most secure Linux distros in 2018

Think of a Linux distribution as a bundle of software delivered together, based on the Linux kernel - a kernel being the core of a system that connects software to hardware and vice versa – with a GNU operating system and a desktop environment, giving the user a visual way to operate the system via a graphical user interface. Linux has a reputation as being more secure than Windows and Mac OS due to a combination of factors – not all of them about the software. Firstly, although desktop Linux users are on the up, Linux environments are far less common in the grand scheme of things than Windows devices on personal computers. The Linux community also tends to be more technical. There are technical reasons too, including fundamental differences in the way the distribution architecture tends to be structured. Nevertheless over the last decade security-focused distributions started to appear, which will appeal to the privacy-conscious user who wants to avoid the worldwide state-sanctioned internet spying that the west has pioneered and where it continues to innovate. Of course, none of these will guarantee your privacy, but they're a good start. Here we list some of them. It is worth noting that security best practices are often about process rather than the technology, avoiding careless mistakes like missing patches and updates, and using your common sense about which websites you visit, what you download, and what you plug into your computer. Read more