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Tuesday, 27 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

How GPLv3 addresses the EUCD and DMCA

Filed under
OSS

Draft 3 of GPLv3 should be out Real Soon Now, so I'd like to review some of the topics. I couldn't find a thorough explanation of how GPLv3 will deal with the "anti-circumvention" clauses of the DMCA and it's EU counterpart, the the EUCD (see Article 6), so here's my layperson understanding.

Novell loses another Samba team member

Filed under
SUSE

A reliable Novell source has sent me Samba team member Guenther Deschner's farewell email to Novell staff and a follow-up from Lars Mueller, another Samba core team member.

Of course Deschner left over Novell's agreement with Microsoft and the bad-faith actions that Novell has taken regarding its GPL-licensed software in connection with that agreement.

Installing Ubuntu - So easy, I may be about to join the darkside

Filed under
Ubuntu

The other day i thought I'd give linux a shot. so I went along to the ubuntu page (http://www.ubuntu.com) and clicked download. downloaded the iso for 6.10 that went pretty quickly - while I was doing other bits and pieces on the web, and it took a grand total of about 45 minutes.

The Road to KDE 4: Amarok 2 Development is Underway

Filed under
KDE

This week we'll take a brief look at some of the many features that are making their way into Amarok 2, which is the development branch for Amarok in KDE 4.The features discussed are all in progress features which have reached varying stages of completion. Read on for information about Amarok's engines (including Phonon), UI changes, changes to the Magnatune music store, OS X support, and more.

n/a

Review of Damn Small Linux 3.2

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Damn Small Linux (DSL) is based on KNOPPIX, so anyone who has used KNOPPIX or Debian in the past will feel right at home. The entire system is around 50MB so it will fit on small, business-card CD-R's and cheap USB memory sticks. DSL is a live CD, meaning it will run completely from a CD without having to install it to your hard drive.

No OSS Graphic Drivers - Who Has The Better Answer?

Filed under
Software

In April of last year CNET published an article entitled New Linux look fuels old debate (this is also an article where I was consulted). Andrew Fear, who is NVIDIA's software product manager, had stated NVIDIA's public reasons why they do not open-source their Linux display drivers.

Andrew Fear (NVIDIA):

Dealing with Runaway Processes

Filed under
HowTos

Have you ever been using your Linux distro and suddenly found a program won’t close? It’s frustrating when an application hangs. In Windows, one could right click on the taskbar and choose “Task Manager” and kill the hanging process (which doesn’t always work BTW). In Linux, you can also kill these hanging processes.

Installing ATI driver in Open SUSE 10.2

Filed under
HowTos

You might have read my previous post on my experience moving from Kubuntu to OpenSuSe. I had to google to find out how to install the ATI driver for my ATI Mobility Radeon X1600 card. I did the driver installation thrice. Here are the steps to install the driver in Open SuSe 10.2.

NVIDIA Releases Gelato 2.1 - Film Quality Rendering Software

Filed under
Software

NVIDIA has released NVIDIA® Gelato® 2.1 high- quality, GPU-accelerated rendering software, which now includes support for Joe Alter's Shave and a Haircut software for computer-generated hair and fur effects.

Yankee Group rebuts Linux-Watch column

Filed under
Microsoft

The Yankee Group send us a rebuttal to a recent column by Steven J. Vaughan Nichols entitled, "Weather alert: new Microsoft FUD storm expected." Research fellow Laura Didio's response appears below, in an effort to allow our readers to hear both sides of the story and form their own judgments.

Hello, Steven:

Texstar on Safari

Filed under
Just talk

Here are some snapshots of PCLinuxOS' Texstar on vacation in New York City last weekend. He says he's having fun and is glad we ain't there! Big Grin

Actually, he said,

The Ubuntu Experience, Part 1

Filed under
Ubuntu

PC World recently did a feature article on Operating Systems, and named Ubuntu as their favorite Linux distribution. I decided to document my experience working with Ubuntu, and this first article, Part 1, will detail my experience installing and updating Ubuntu. I'm using the latest version of Ubuntu, 6.1.

Microsoft FAT patent fails in Germany

Filed under
Microsoft

While the U.S. courts recently reaffirmed Microsoft's FAT (File Allocation Table) patents, the German Patent Federal Court has just dismissed the patent for use in Germany.

According to a report in the German news publication Heise Online, the court has denied the protection that the European Patent Office granted to Microsoft under EP 0618540 for a "common namespace for long and short filenames." This was based on Microsoft's US Patent No. 5,758,352. The German Patent Court stated that the patent claims Microsoft made are "not based on inventive activity."

Perens to rain on Novell's parade

Filed under
SUSE

Bruce Perens, director of Action on Technology Policy and initiator of the Open Letter to Novell that has been signed by thousands, will hold a press conference during Novell's Brainshare conference in Salt Lake City, Utah next week. The topics will be:

* The Microsoft-Novell agreement

* GPL version 3 and how it will impede Novell from making use of new innovation by the Free Software community

* Software patents vs. Free Software.

More Here.

Candidates for Debian Project Leader sound off

Filed under
Linux

Once again, the Debian project is gearing up to elect a new project leader, with voting set to begin late this month. As we did last year, we asked the DPL candidates to sound off on some of the issues that will face the Debian Project in the next year.

Out of nine candidates, six took the time to respond to our questions via email. Steve McIntyre, Sven Luther, and incumbent DPL Anthony Towns failed to respond in time for this article. We received responses from Wouter Verhelst, Aigars Mahinovs, Gustavo Franco, Sam Hocevar, Simon Richter, and Raphaël Hertzog.

Why Linux will not displace Windows

Filed under
Linux

I firmly believe that, all else being equal, the differences between the Windows desktop, the Macintosh desktop, and the Linux desktop are negligible. With the proper applications, all three platforms will be capable of providing a satisfactory experience for any user. All three platforms have both free and commercial products available for personal productivity, web browsing, and basic multimedia.

HP Touts its Prowess in Linux and Open Source

Filed under
OSS

While everyone knows that Linux is now pervasive in IT organizations, the slippery nature of open source software makes it difficult to gauge how deeply it has penetrated into the data centers of the world. And it is even harder to reckon how much money those Linux investments represent, since in many cases the costs associated with Linux are soft ones--paying system administrators to patch machines--rather than hard ones--buying a license and support contract from a third-party vendor. And if Linux is hard to quantify, other open source software presents even more of a challenge.

Command line tips - controlling your processes

Filed under
HowTos

When you’re running a command that’s going to take a long time in your bash shell, but then you suddenly decide you don’t want to run it any more, CLI newbies can often be stuck as to how they should terminate a running command (aside from closing the terminal window). There are also other occasions when you want to control the process that’s running inside your terminal.

This post is going to give you a quick run-down of some of the most common key combinations that perform useful actions like terminating processes and setting them to run in the foreground and background.

Mozilla wrestles with Firefox 3.0 security moves

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla Corp. is still wrestling with adding a security feature to Firefox that its browser rival, Microsoft Corp.'s Internet Explorer 7, uses on Windows Vista to keep malware from hijacking computers.

In Vista, IE7 uses a technique Microsoft calls Protected Mode -- another name for "low rights" -- that blocks disk access to all but a temporary-files folder. The idea is that if an exploit -- a drive-by download, for instance -- attacks IE7 through a browser vulnerability, it can't install code on the PC's drive.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

  • 6 open source fitness apps for Android
    A key part of developing a good fitness routine is creating a solid workout plan and tracking your progress. Mobile apps can help by providing readily accessible programs specifically designed to support the user's fitness goals. In a world of fitness wearable devices like FitBit, there are plenty of proprietary apps designed to work with those specific devices. These apps certainly provide a lot of detailed tracking information, but they are not open source, and as such, do not necessarily respect the user's privacy and freedom to use their own data as they wish. The alternative is to use open source fitness apps. Below, I take a look at six open source fitness apps for Android. Most of them do not provide super detailed collection of health data, but they do provide a focused user experience, giving the user the tools to support their workouts or develop a plan and track their progress. All these apps are available from the F-Droid repository and are all licensed under the GPLv3, providing an experience that respects the user's freedom.
  • Roku Express, Roku Premiere, and Roku Ultra announced, starting at $29.99
    Roku Inc, maker of the popular Roku line of home media players, has just refreshed their entire product lineup at once. The existing lineup of flagship Roku boxes (but not the Roku Streaming Stick) has been replaced by three new products (with upgraded models for each); the Roku Express, the Roku Premiere, and the Roku Ultra.
  • This is what the Chromecast Ultra will look like
    Google is ramping up for their major October 4th event. In addition to seeing the Pixel and the Pixel XL formally unveiled, we’re also expecting a new Chromebook and the Chromecast Ultra. Until today, we had no idea what to really expect from the new Chromecast device in terms of design, but now we’re finally getting a sneak peek.
  • Android + Chrome = Andromeda; merged OS reportedly coming to the Pixel 3
    It has been almost a year since The Wall Street Journal dropped a bomb of a scoop on the Android community, saying Chrome OS would be "folded into" Android. The resulting product would reportedly bring Android to laptops and desktops. According to the paper, the internal effort to merge these two OSes had been underway for "roughly two years" (now three years) with a release planned for 2017 and an "early version" to show things off in 2016. It seems like we're still on that schedule, and now Android Police claims to have details on the new operating system—and its first launch device—coming Q3 2017.

Fedora 26 Linux OS to Ship with OpenSSL 1.1.0 by Default for Better Security

Fedora Program Manager Jan Kurik informs the Fedora Linux community about a new system-wide change for the upcoming Fedora 26 operating system, namely the addition of the OpenSSL 1.1.0 libraries by default. It appears that current Fedora Linux releases ship with OpenSSL 1.0.2h, which has been patched with the latest security fixes, but the team decided it was time to upgrade the OpenSSL libraries (libssl and libcrypto) to a newer, more advanced branch. Therefore, Fedora 26 Linux will ship with OpenSSL 1.1.0 by default, which will have a massive impact on the overall stability and security of the OS. "Update the OpenSSL library to the 1.1.0 branch in Fedora to bring multiple big improvements, new cryptographic algorithms, and new API that allows for keeping ABI stability in future upgrades. We will also add compat openssl102 package so the applications and other dependencies which are not ported yet to the new API continue to work," reads the proposal. Read more Also: GLPI version 9.1

Lenovo Anti-Linux, Layoffs, and Openwashing

  • Microsoft, Lenovo Accused Of Blocking Linux On Signature Edition PCs
    Laptops today are increasingly powerful. Right now, if you get a new laptop, the probability is that it comes with the new Windows 10 operating system but there are some people that prefer to have a choice when it comes to OS selection. While some people are fine with Windows 10, there are those who might want to have a dual OS system running. A few people who bought Lenovo laptops like the Yoga 900, 910S, and 710S, found that Lenovo was blocking Linux.
  • Motorola, Lenovo lay off over a thousand more people
  • New Lenovo layoffs at Moto, company has now lost over 95% of employees in four years
    Speaking to Droid-life, both sources inside the company and Motorola itself confirmed today that Lenovo has conducted a brutal round of layoffs at Moto. According to DL, over 50% of Motorola's existing US staff have lost their jobs. A 20-year veteran of the company allegedly posted on Facebook that he had been laid off, so it looks like Lenovo is cutting deep at the device-maker. One source told them that over 700 employees would be asked to leave of the over 1200 Motorola currently employs. No doubt Lenovo hopes to cut costs by integrating much of Motorola's software and hardware development into its own smartphone unit. Sensible or not, it's still rather sad to watch the once-proud brand slowly be swallowed by The Great Lenovo Monster. The lack of critical or consumer hype around the company's new Moto Z line hasn't helped matters, and while the refreshed Moto G franchise was generally well-received, it's the expensive phones that make the money, and I have a hard time believing the Z series is a runaway sales success.
  • Lenovo Courts Devs WIth Moto Z Source Code Release
    Lenovo, which owns Motorola, last week released the kernel source code for the Moto Z Droid smartphone on Github. The move follows the company's posting of the Moto Z Droid Moto Mods Development Kit and Moto Mods on Github this summer. This is the first kernel source code made available for the Moto Z family of devices. Releasing the kernel source code seems to be another step in Lenovo's attempt to get devs to build an iPhone-like ecosystem around the Moto Z family. The Z family is modular.