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Tuesday, 19 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story ut2004 Update Out srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:00am
Story Coolest Homepage Yet! srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:00am
Story IBM Sets Its Sights on Linux Software srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:59am
Story Review of PCLOS srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 6:24am
Story The Myth of Linux Security srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:39am
Story M$ Plans more Secure Browser :roll: srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:38am
Story Whoops: KDE fliccd Buffer Overflow Vulnerabilities srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 6:30am
Story Study Find Open Source More Secure srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:36am
Story Interview with Bill Gates srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:36am
Story Security Showdown: Back & Forth srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:35am

The state of open source accelerated graphics on ARM devices

Filed under
OSS

I’ve been meaning to write about the state of accelerated open source graphics options for a while now to give an update on a blog post I wrote over 5 years ago in January 2012, before the Raspberry Pi even existed! Reading back through that post it was pretty dark times for any form of GUI on ARM devices but with the massive changes in ARM devices and the massive change in SBCs (Single Board Computers) heralded by things like the Raspberry Pi have things improved at all? The answer is generally yes!

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Verified cryptography for Firefox 57

    Traditionally, software is produced in this way: write some code, maybe do some code review, run unit-tests, and then hope it is correct. Hard experience shows that it is very hard for programmers to write bug-free software. These bugs are sometimes caught in manual testing, but many bugs still are exposed to users, and then must be fixed in patches or subsequent versions. This works for most software, but it’s not a great way to write cryptographic software; users expect and deserve assurances that the code providing security and privacy is well written and bug free.

  • Busting the myth that net neutrality hampers investment

    This week I had the opportunity to share Mozilla’s vision for an Internet that is open and accessible to all with the audience at MWC Americas.

    I took this opportunity because we are at a pivotal point in the debate between the FCC, companies, and users over the FCC’s proposal to roll back protections for net neutrality. Net neutrality is a key part of ensuring freedom of choice to access content and services for consumers.

    Earlier this week Mozilla’s Heather West wrote a letter to FCC Chairman Ajit Pai highlighting how net neutrality has fueled innovation in Silicon Valley and can do so still across the United States.

    The FCC claims these protections hamper investment and are bad for business. And they may vote to end them as early as October. Chairman Pai calls his rule rollback “restoring internet freedom” but that’s really the freedom of the 1% to make decisions that limit the rest of the population.

  • Sysadmin war story: “The network ate my font!”

     

    Turns out the printer had a cache for fonts and was using the font cached from the earlier check image which included the font! Moreover, the Toronto and Hollywood offices were on a different printer maintenance schedule — and as part of the maintenance the printers are rebooted which clears the font cache!

  • The Harmful Consequences of Postel's Maxim draft-thomson-postel-was-wrong-01

     

    Jon Postel's famous statement in RFC 1122 of "Be liberal in what you accept, and conservative in what you send" - is a principle that has long guided the design of Internet protocols and implementations of those protocols.  The posture this statement advocates might promote interoperability in the short term, but that short-term advantage is outweighed by negative consequences that affect the long-term maintenance of a protocol and its ecosystem.

  • Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan Inc. (TSX:POT), Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT): VC in The Spotlight

OSS: Open Networking Foundation, Lyft and Uber, WordPress, VMware, FSFE and More

Filed under
OSS
  • Open Networking Foundation Subsumes On.Lab

    The Open Networking Foundation (ONF) this week declared its merger with On.Lab as complete. And it named AT&T CTO Andre Fuetsch chairman of ONF’s board.

    The ONF and On.Lab initiated their merger a little less than a year ago. By that point, ONF’s role as a cheerleader for software defined networking was becoming obviated given that SDN had gained wide acceptance. The merged entity has two major projects to shepherd: the Central Office Re-architected as a Datacenter (CORD) and the Open Network Operating System (ONOS).

  • Lyft and Uber on Stage Together at Open Source Summit in L.A.

    Envoy is a high-performance open source edge and service proxy that makes the network transparent to applications. Lyft Software Engineer Matt Klein led his team to design the technology to move their architecture away from a monolith toward a microservices model.

    Jaeger is an open source distributed tracing system inspired by Google Dapper paper and OpenZipkin community. It can be used for tracing microservice-based architectures. Uber began deploying Jaeger internally in 2015. It is now integrated into thousands of microservices and recording thousands of traces every second.

  • The challenges of supporting geolocation in WordPress

    As much as we get addicted to mobile phones and online services, nobody (outside of cyberpunk fiction) actually lives online. That's why maps, geolocation services, and geographic information systems (GISes) have come to play a bigger role online. They reflect they way we live, work, travel, socialize, and (in the case of natural or human-made disasters, which come more and more frequently) suffer. Thus there is value in integrating geolocation into existing web sites, but systems like WordPress do not make supporting that easy. The software development firm LuminFire has contributed to the spread of geolocation services by creating a library for WordPress that helps web sites insert geolocation information into web pages. This article describes how LuminFire surmounted the challenges posed by WordPress and shows a few uses for the library.

    LuminFire developer Michael Moore presented the library, called WP-GeoMeta-Lib, at a talk (the slides are available in Moore's blog posting) on August 16 at FOSS4G, the major open-source geolocation conference. FOSS4G's success itself demonstrates the growing importance of geolocation, as well as the thriving free-software communities that create solutions for it through group projects such as the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo). FOSS4G held its first conference in 2007 in Thailand. Its global wanderings, which would require sophisticated geolocation tools to track, brought it this year to Boston, where it topped 1,100 registered attendees—its biggest turnout yet.

  • How Serious is VMware About Open Source?
  • Snowden: Public money shouldn't fund software the public isn't allowed to fix

    Paul Brown writes, "The FSFE's 'Public Money? Public Code!' campaign wants to convince lawmakers that software created with public funds should be made available to the public under Free Software licences.

  • Facebook invests in CIFAR AI, CalcFlow goes open source and FTP deprecated in Chrome
  • Ansible announces AWX, 13-year-old keynotes on AI for brain wave analysis, and more news

Devices: Fairphone, Amino, Nordija, Purism

Filed under
Android
Linux
Hardware
  • End of Support for Fairphone 1: Some Unanswered Questions

    I previously followed the goings-on at Fairphone a lot more closely than I have done recently, so after having mentioned the obsolescence risks of the first model in an earlier article, it was interesting to discover a Fairphone blog post explaining why the company will no longer support the Fairphone 1. Some of the reasons given are understandable: they went to market with an existing design, focusing instead on minimising the use of conflict minerals; as a result various parts are no longer manufactured or available; the manufacturer they used even stopped producing phones altogether!

    A mention of batteries is made in the article, and in community reaction to the announcement, a lot of concern has been expressed about how long the batteries will be good for, whether any kind of replacements might be found, and so on. With today’s bewildering proliferation of batteries of different shapes and sizes, often sealed into devices for guaranteed obsolescence, we are surely storing up a great deal of trouble for the future in this realm. But that is a topic for another time.

  • Amino and Nordija move between Android and Linux

    Amino and Nordija are to showcase a new dual mode platform that enables operators to seamlessly move between Android and Linux-based TV delivery.

    It’s designed to provide a consistent state-of-the-art user experience.

  • Purism and KDE to Work Together on World's First Truly Free Smartphone

Programming: PyCon, Python, NativeScript and NVIDIA 381.26.17

Filed under
Development
  • [Older] Two days remaining for PyCon Pune 2018 CFP

    The CFP for PyCon Pune 2018 will close at the end of 15th September AOE. If you are thinking about submitting a talk, this is a good time to do that. The conference will happen from 8-11th February in Pune, India. The first 2 days are the main conference, a single track event where will have around 650 people. The last two days will be devsprints.

  • Python security transparency

    As Steve Dower noted in his lightning talk at the 2017 Python Language Summit, Python itself can be considered a security vulnerability—because of its power, its presence on a target system is a boon to attackers. Now, Dower is trying to address parts of that problem with a Python Enhancement Proposal (PEP) that would enable system administrators and others to detect when Python is being used for a nefarious purpose by increasing the "security transparency" of the language. It is not a solution that truly thwarts an attacker's ability to use Python in an unauthorized way, but will make it easier for administrators to detect, and eventually disable, those kinds of attacks.

  • Open Source NativeScript Mobile Framework Tackles Augmented Reality

    With augmented reality the new hotness in the mobile development space, companies right and left are jumping on the AR bandwagon, including Progress, which just announced upcoming support in its open source, cross-platform NativeScript framework.

    AR, popularized last year by the runaway success of Pokémon GO, lets developers enhance real-world imagery with computer-generated sensory input, such as graphics and sound.

  • NVIDIA 381.26.17 Adds Vulkan 1.0.61 Support

    For those wanting the bleeding-edge NVIDIA Vulkan driver support, a new beta was pushed out today providing same-day support for the Vulkan 1.0.61 update.

Software: OpenStack Charms 17.08, PiCluster 2.2 and More

Filed under
Software
  • OpenStack Charms 17.08 release!

    The OpenStack Charms team is pleased to announce that the 17.08 release of the OpenStack Charms is now available from jujucharms.com!

    In addition to 204 bug fixes across the charms and support for OpenStack Pike, this release includes a new charm for Gnocchi, support for Neutron internal DNS, Percona Cluster performance tuning and much more.

  • Go Serverless with new PiCluster 2.2

    I am pleased to introduce the new release of PiCluster! In PiCluster 2.2, there is now support to deploy functions! With this new feature, applications can spin up containers themselves and retrieve data from the PiCluster server. Let’s explore how this works.

    When a function is finished running, the container is automatically deleted and the output is stored on the server. When the application requests the data from the server, the data is removed as well.

  •  

  • Plasma publictransport rewrite – Part II

    Last time we heard the publictransport applet was being re-written was almost a year back now. Since then, it has indeed gone through some sorts of rewrite, but at the Randa meetings, 2017, this has taken a whole new course.

  • Spam filtering with Rspamd

    Running one's own mail system on the Internet has become an increasingly difficult thing to do, to the point that many people don't bother, even if they have the necessary skills. Among the challenges is spam; without effective spam filtering, an email account will quickly drown under a deluge of vile offers, phishing attempts, malware, and alternative facts. Many of us turn to SpamAssassin for this task, but it's not the only alternative; Rspamd is increasingly worth considering in this role. Your editor gave Rspamd a spin to get a sense for whether switching would be a good thing to do.

    SpamAssassin is a highly effective tool; its developers could be forgiven for thinking that they have solved the spam problem and can move on. Which is good, because they would appear to have concluded exactly that. The "latest news" on the project's page reveals that the last release was 3.4.1, which came out in April 2015. Stability in a core communications tool is good but, still, it is worth asking whether there is really nothing more to be done in the area of spam filtering.

  • Finding driver bugs with DR. CHECKER

    Drivers are a consistent source of kernel bugs, at least partly due to less review, but also because drivers are typically harder for tools to analyze. A team from the University of California, Santa Barbara has set out to change that with a static-analysis tool called DR. CHECKER. In a paper [PDF] presented at the recent 26th USENIX Security Symposium, the team introduced the tool and the results of running it on nine production Linux kernels. Those results were rather encouraging: "it correctly identified 158 critical zero-day bugs with an overall precision of 78%".

Kernel: LWN Linux Articles (Now Free), Testers Wanted

Filed under
Linux
  • CPU frequency governors and remote callbacks

    The kernel's CPU-frequency ("cpufreq") governors are charged with picking an operating frequency for each processor that minimizes power use while maintaining an adequate level of performance as determined by the current policy. These governors normally run locally, with each CPU handling its own frequency management. The 4.14 kernel release, though, will enable the CPU-frequency governors to control the frequency of any CPU in the system if the architecture permits, a change that should improve the performance of the system overall.

    For a long time, the cpufreq governors used the kernel's timer infrastructure to run at a regular interval and sample CPU utilization. That approach had its shortcomings; the biggest one was that the cpufreq governors were running in a reactive mode, choosing the next frequency based on the load pattern in the previous sampling period. There is, of course, no guarantee that the same load pattern will continue after the frequency is changed. Additionally, there was no coordination between the cpufreq governors and the task scheduler. It would be far better if the cpufreq governors were proactive and, working with the scheduler, could choose a frequency that suits the load that the system is going to have in the next sampling period.

  • A last-minute MMU notifier change

    One does not normally expect to see significant changes to an important internal memory-management mechanism in the time between the ‑rc7 prepatch and the final release for a development cycle, but that is exactly what happened just before 4.13 was released. A regression involving the memory-management unit (MMU) notifier mechanism briefly threatened to delay this release, but a last-minute scramble kept 4.13 on schedule and also resulted in a cleanup of that mechanism. This seems like a good time to look at a mechanism that Linus Torvalds called "a badly designed mistake" and how it was made to be a bit less mistaken.

  • A pile of stable kernel updates
  • Improving Linux laptop battery life: Testers Wanted

Security: Eugene Kaspersky, IT security in the EU, CouchDB, Telcos, D-Link, Bluetooth, and Fitbit

Filed under
Security

CentOS 7.4 Is Now Available for 64-Bit, ARM64, ARMhfp, POWER7 & POWER8 Machines

Filed under
OS
Red Hat

CentOS developers Karanbir Singh and Jim Perrin announced the release of the CentOS 7.4 operating system for supported architectures, a release that brings all the latest updates and security patches.

Read more

Ubuntu and GNOME Devs Team Up to Ease Your "Unity to GNOME" Transition

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system is only a few weeks away, and it will be shipping with the recently released GNOME 3.26 desktop environment by default, running on top of the next-generation Wayland display server.

Read more

also: Canonical Adds Support for GNOME's JHBuild Tool to Its Snapcraft Snappy Creator

Containers: Kubernetes, Heptio, and Oracle

Filed under
Server
  • Kubernetes, containers help mainstream open-source software

    Open-source software is now a key part of the tech world, matching proprietary software through a combination of enthusiastic developers, organizations and shared standards. This trend is especially visible in the world of container technology, a popular virtualization method for deploying and running distributed software applications.

    “Open source is the mainstream now. It’s very hard to release a proprietary product right now and come up with some justification about why you have to do it,” said Steve Pousty (pictured), lead developer advocate, OpenShift Online, at Red Hat Inc.

  • Heptio Raises New Funding to Close Kubernetes Operational Gaps

    Craig McLuckie helped launch the open-source Kubernetes project while at Google and has been busy since November 2016 with his new company Heptio. Heptio is now moving forward, thanks to a $25 million Series B round of funding, bringing total funding to date for the startup to $33.5 million.

    "Kubernetes is doing really well, there is a lot of energy in the ecosystem, and many companies are making Kubernetes a core part of their operating practices," McLuckie told eWEEK in a video interview.

  • Oracle Joins Cloud Native Computing Foundation in Kubernetes Push

    Oracle has taken a plunge deeper into open source waters by joining the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) as a platinum member. The announcement was made Wednesday, on stage with Linux Foundation executive director Jim Zemlin, at Open Source Summit in Los Angeles. In addition, Oracle announced it's bringing Kubernetes to Oracle Linux and open sourcing a Terraform Kubernetes Installer for Oracle Cloud. This prompted Zemlin to remark that "six of the largest clouds are now running Kubernetes."

  • Larry Ellison: There is No One Left for Oracle to Buy

    Oracle isn't likely to be buying any other big companies soon, according to founder Larry Ellison.

More of "Public Money, Public Code"

Filed under
OSS
  • Public money? Public Code!
  • Public Money? Public Code! 31 organisations ask to improve public procurement of software

    Digital services offered and used by public administrations are the critical infrastructure of 21st-century democratic nations. To establish trustworthy systems, government agencies must ensure they have full control over systems at the core of our digital infrastructure. This is rarely the case today due to restrictive software licences.

  • Public Money, Public Code, Public Control

    An interesting article published by the UK Government Digital Service was referenced in a response to the LWN.net coverage of the recently-launched “Public Money, Public Code” campaign. Arguably, the article focuses a little too much on “in the open” and perhaps not enough on the matter of control. Transparency is a good thing, collaboration is a good thing, no-one can really argue about spending less tax money and getting more out of it, but it is the matter of control that makes this campaign and similar initiatives so important.

  • FSFE: publicly funded software has to be open source

    Digital services offered and used by public administrations are the critical infrastructure of 21st-century democratic nations. To establish trustworthy systems, government agencies must ensure they have full control over systems at the core of our digital infrastructure. This is rarely the case today due to restrictive software licences.

Ubuntu Press/Development: Kernel Team Summary, Snap, NEC, Servers and GNOME Desktop

Filed under
Ubuntu

Debian Development and News: Google Blobs, RcppMsgPack 0.2.0, RcppRedis 0.1.8 and devscripts needs YOU!

Filed under
Development
Debian
  • Google Hangouts in Debian testing (Buster)

    Google offers a lot of software components packaged specifically for Debian and Debian-like Linux distributions. Examples are: Chrome, Earth and the Hangouts plugin. Also, there are many other Internet services doing the same: Spotify, Dropbox, etc. I’m really grateful for them, since this make our life easier.

    Problem is that our ecosystem is rather complex, with many distributions and many versions out there. I guess is not an easy task for them to keep such a big variety of support variations.

  • RcppMsgPack 0.2.0
  • RcppRedis 0.1.8
  • devscripts needs YOU!

    Over the past 10 years, I've been a member of a dwindling team of people maintaining the devscripts package in Debian.

  • My Free Software Activities in August 2017

    Here is my monthly report that covers what I have been doing for Debian.

Red Hat, Fedora and Flock

Filed under
Red Hat

Security: Windows Zeo-Day, Cryptography, Updates, Reproducible Builds, Vendor Bans, AT& and More

Filed under
Security

Equifax Failed to Patch, Now Fails as a Company

Filed under
Security
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More in Tux Machines

Games: Ostriv, Back to Bed, EVERSPACE, Hiveswap: Act 1

Openwashing and Microsoft FUD

BlueBorne Vulnerability Is Patched in All Supported Ubuntu Releases, Update Now

Canonical released today new kernel updates for all of its supported Ubuntu Linux releases, patching recently discovered security vulnerabilities, including the infamous BlueBorne that exposes billions of Bluetooth devices. The BlueBorne vulnerability (CVE-2017-1000251) appears to affect all supported Ubuntu versions, including Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) up to 16.04.3, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) up to 14.04.5, and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) up to 12.04.5. Read more

Security: Updates, 2017 Linux Security Summit, Software Updates for Embedded Linux and More

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • The 2017 Linux Security Summit
    The past Thursday and Friday was the 2017 Linux Security Summit, and once again I think it was a great success. A round of thanks to James Morris for leading the effort, the program committee for selecting a solid set of talks (we saw a big increase in submissions this year), the presenters, the attendees, the Linux Foundation, and our sponsor - thank you all! Unfortunately we don't have recordings of the talks, but I've included my notes on each of the presentations below. I've also included links to the slides, but not all of the slides were available at the time of writing; check the LSS 2017 slide archive for updates.
  • Key Considerations for Software Updates for Embedded Linux and IoT
    The Mirai botnet attack that enslaved poorly secured connected embedded devices is yet another tangible example of the importance of security before bringing your embedded devices online. A new strain of Mirai has caused network outages to about a million Deutsche Telekom customers due to poorly secured routers. Many of these embedded devices run a variant of embedded Linux; typically, the distribution size is around 16MB today. Unfortunately, the Linux kernel, although very widely used, is far from immune to critical security vulnerabilities as well. In fact, in a presentation at Linux Security Summit 2016, Kees Cook highlighted two examples of critical security vulnerabilities in the Linux kernel: one being present in kernel versions from 2.6.1 all the way to 3.15, the other from 3.4 to 3.14. He also showed that a myriad of high severity vulnerabilities are continuously being found and addressed—more than 30 in his data set.
  • APNIC-sponsored proposal could vastly improve DNS resilience against DDoS