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Tuesday, 17 Jul 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story Do You Have an Xbox? srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:35am
Story This Week at the Movies: Hitch & The Aviator srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:34am
Story Latest On the Browser Wars srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:32am
Story Legislation to regulate games srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:31am
Story Typing Style Can Be Password srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:30am
Story Hey Coool, a Virtual Tour srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:30am
Story Experiences of a Linux Newbie srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:29am
Story June Cleaver meets Fortune 500 srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:29am
Story Predictions of Gloom and Doom srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:29am
Story EBay eyes open source srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:28am

Mozilla: Addons, OverbiteNX and Remarks on Indian Telecom Commission

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Mozilla Addons Blog: Upcoming changes for themes

    Theming capabilities on addons.mozilla.org (AMO) will undergo significant changes in the coming weeks. We will be switching to a new theme technology that will give designers more flexibility to create their themes. It includes support for multiple background images, and styling of toolbars and tabs. We will migrate all existing themes to this new format, and their users should not notice any changes.

    [...]

    It’s only a matter of weeks before we release the new theme format on AMO. Keep following this blog for that announcement.

  • OverbiteNX is now available from Mozilla Add-Ons for beta testing

    OverbiteNX, a successor to OverbiteFF which allows Firefox to continue to access legacy resources in Gopher in the brave courageous new world of WebExtensions, is now in public beta. Unlike the alpha test, which required you to download the repo and install the extension using add-on debugging, OverbiteNX is now hosted on Mozilla Add-Ons.

    Because WebExtensions still doesn't have a TCP sockets API, nor a spec, OverbiteNX uses its bespoke Onyx native component to do network operations. Onyx is written in open-source portable C with no dependencies and is available in pre-built binaries for macOS 10.12+ and Windows (or get the repo and build it yourself on almost any POSIX system).

  • India advances globally leading net neutrality regulations

    India is now one step away from having some of the strongest net neutrality regulations in the world. This week, the Indian Telecom Commission’s approved the Telecom Regulatory Authority of India’s (TRAI) recommendations to introduce net neutrality conditions into all Telecom Service Provider (TSP) licenses. This means that any net neutrality violation could cause a TSP to lose its license, a uniquely powerful deterrent. Mozilla commends this vital action by the Telecom Commission, and we urge the Government of India to move swiftly to implement these additions to the license terms.

  • India sets the bar for net neutrality with 'world's strictest' rules

     

    Whilst the US is still fumbling after FCC head Ajit ‘Pumpkin' Pie deregulated the internet to please his cable pals, India has just past a whole chunk of recommendations from the Telecom Regulatory Association of India (TRAI) to ensure it will never go the same way.

  • India implements strong net neutrality rules

     

    The government has taken an "unambiguous stand" in making sure that certain types of content are not prioritized over others and that broadband providers will be unable to slow down or block websites at their choosing, India's telecom regulatory body declared Thursday.
     

    Around two-thirds of the country’s 1.3 billion people still don't have [I]nternet access, but the country is moving forward with its net neutrality plans as more and more people begin to use smartphones.

Clear Linux Makes a Strong Case for Your Next Cloud Platform

Filed under
Reviews

There are so many Linux distributions available, some of which are all-purpose and some that have a more singular focus. Truth be told, you can take most general distributions and turn them into purpose-driven platforms. But, when it comes to things like cloud and IoT, most prefer distributions built with that specific use in mind. That’s where the likes of Clear Linux comes in. This particular flavor of Linux was designed for the cloud, and it lets you install either an incredibly bare OS or one with exactly what you need to start developing for cloud and/or IoT.

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GCC 8.2 Compiler Will Be Releasing Soon

Filed under
Development
GNU

Developers behind the GNU Compiler Collection intend to get release preparations underway soon for the GCC 8.2 compiler.

GCC8 remains open for bug/regression fixes and documentation updates with GCC 8.2 due to be the first point release under the GCC versioning policy where the May release of GCC 8.1 marked the project's first stable feature release of GCC8. New feature development meanwhile remains focused on GCC 9, which will be released initially as GCC 9.1 around early 2019.

So to no surprise, GCC 8.2 is set to carry just various regression fixes primarily as more developers began trying out this annually updated compiler following the recent stable release.

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Linux Foundation on Jobs and Funding

Filed under
Linux
  • 5 Reasons Open Source Certification Matters More Than Ever

    In today’s technology landscape, open source is the new normal, with open source components and platforms driving mission-critical processes and everyday tasks at organizations of all sizes. As open source has become more pervasive, it has also profoundly impacted the job market. Across industries the skills gap is widening, making it ever more difficult to hire people with much needed job skills. In response, the demand for training and certification is growing.

  • Developer Recruitment Drives Open Source Funding

    The latest 2018 Open Source Jobs Report points to several ways employers can help developers. For the study, the Linux Foundation and Dice surveyed over 750 hiring managers involved with recruiting open source professionals.

    Due to the survey’s subject, it is not surprising almost half of hiring managers (48 percent) say their company decided to financially support or contribute open source projects to help with recruitment. Although this sounds incredibly compelling, it is fair to question how much hiring managers actually know about open source management. Since 57 percent of hiring managers say their company contributes to open source projects, a back-of-the-envelope calculation says that 84 percent of companies that contribute to open source are doing so at least in part to get new employees.

    The New Stack and The Linux Foundation have teamed up to survey the community about ways to standardize and promote open source policies programmatically. We encourage readers to participate.

KDE and Akademy News

Filed under
KDE
  • Third Weekly Post

    I wonder if the palettes still need the tag system. All right, a question to ask in the next meeting.

    These 2 weeks have been great for me, because I had a change to really get myself familiarized with the Qt MVC system. I believe I’ll be confident when I need to use it in future projects.

    The next step is too make Krita store palettes used in a painting in its .kra file. There seems to be some annoying dependency stuff, but I should be able to handle.

  • I’m going to KDE Akademy 2018

    Less than a month left until KDE Akademy 2018. As part of the local organization team, this is going to be a busy time, but having Akademy in such a great city as Vienna is gonna be awesome.

    You will over the next weeks find many more “I’m going to Akademy” posts on Planet KDE detailing the Akademy plans of other people. So here in this post I don’t want to look forward, but back and tell you the story of the (in retrospect quite long) process of how a few people from Vienna decided to put in a bid to organize Akademy 2018.

  • I too am going to Akademy

    In about a month I’ll be in the beautiful city of Vienna, giving a talk on the weird stuff I make using ImageMagick, Kdenlive, Synfig and FFmpeg so I can construct videos so bad and campy you could almost confuse them for being ironic…

  • An update on KDE's Streamlined Onboarding Goal, Akademy talk and first sprint

    As I described in the introductory post, KDE has been working towards a trinity of goals and I have been responsible for pushing forward the Streamlined onboarding of new contributors one.

    Half a year has passed since my initial blog post and with Akademy, KDE’s annual conference, coming up in a month this is a great time to post a quick update on related developments.

Programming: Go, Python, GCC, Git and Qt

Filed under
Development
  • Locks versus channels in concurrent Go

    In this article, a short look at goroutines, threads, and race conditions sets the scene for a look at two Go programs. In the first program, goroutines communicate through synchronized shared memory, and the second uses channels for the same purpose. The code is available from my website in a .zip file with a README.

  • Pete Zaitcev: Guido van Rossum steps down
  • Guido van Rossum Stepping Down from Role as Python's Benevolent Dictator For Life

    Python's Benevolent Dictator For Life (BDFL) Guido van Rossum today announced he's stepping down from the role.

    On the Python mailing list today, van Rossum said, "I would like to remove myself entirely from the decision process. I'll still be there for a while as an ordinary core dev, and I'll still be available to mentor people—possibly more available. But I'm basically giving myself a permanent vacation from being BDFL, and you all will be on your own."

  • GCC 8 Hasn't Been Performing As Fast As It Should For Skylake With "-march=native"

    It turns out that when using GCC 8 since April (or GCC 9 development code) if running on Intel Skylake (or newer architectures like the yet-to-be-out Cannonlake or Icelake) and compile your code with the "-march=native" flag for what should tune for your CPU microarchitecture's full capabilities, that hasn't entirely been the case. A fix is en route that can correct the performance by as much as 60%.

  • Upcoming git-crecord release

    More than 1½ years since the first release of git-crecord, I’m preparing a big update. Not aware how exactly many people are using it, I neglected the maintenance for some time, but last month I’ve decided I need to take action and fix some issues I’ve known since the first release.

  • Profiling memory usage on Linux with Qt Creator 4.7

    You may have heard about the Performance Analyzer (called “CPU Usage Analyzer” in Qt Creator 4.6 and earlier). It is all about profiling applications using the excellent “perf” tool on Linux. You can use it locally on a Linux-based desktop system or on various embedded devices. perf can record a variety of events that may occur in your application. Among these are cache misses, memory loads, context switches, or the most common one, CPU cycles, which periodically records a stack sample after a number of CPU cycles have passed. The resulting profile shows you what functions in your application take the most CPU cycles. This is the Performance Analyzer’s most prominent use case, at least so far.

Linux Foundation (LF) Introduces LF Energy

Filed under
Linux
  • The Linux Foundation Forms Open Source Energy Coalition

    The Linux Foundation formed a new open source coalition with support from European transmission power systems provider RTE, Vanderbilt University, the European Network of Transmission System Operators, and the Electric Power Research Institute.

    Called LF Energy, the coalition’s members seek to inform and expedite the energy transition, including the move to electric mobility as well as connected sensors and devices, while at the same time modernizing and protecting the grid, according to the Linux Foundation.

    The coalition intends to focus on reusable components, open APIs and interfaces through project communities that the energy sector can adopt into platforms and solutions, the foundation says.

    “LF Energy is an umbrella organization that will support and sustain multi-vendor collaboration and open source progress in the energy and electricity sectors to accelerate information and communication technologies (ICT) critical to balanced energy use and economic value,” says the Linux Foundation, which was founded in 2000 to accelerate open technology development and industry adoption.

  • The Linux Foundation Transforms the Energy Industry with New Initiative: LF Energy

    We are thrilled to introduce the new LF Energy initiative to support and promote open source in the energy and electricity sectors. LF Energy is focused on accelerating the energy transition, including the move to renewable energy, electric mobility, demand response and more.

    Open source has transformed industries as vast and different as telecommunications, financial services, automobiles, healthcare, and consumer products. Now we are excited to bring the same level of open collaboration and shared innovation to the power systems industry.

  • The Linux Foundation Launches LF ENERGY, New Open Source Coalition

    Just as open source software has transformed automobiles, telecommunications, financial services, and healthcare, The Linux Foundation today announces the formation of LF Energy with support from RTE, Europe's biggest transmission power systems provider, and other organizations, to speed technological innovation and transform the energy mix across the world.

    LF Energy also welcomes four new projects to be hosted at The Linux Foundation as part of the initiative, which will advance everything from smart assistants for system operators to smart grid controls software.

ARM Takes Down Its Website That Attacked Open-Source Rival

Filed under
Hardware

ARM, the incredibly successful developer of CPU designs, appears to be getting a little nervous about an open-source rival that’s gaining traction. At the end of June, ARM launched a website outlining why it’s better than its competitor’s offerings and it quickly blew up in its face. Realising the site was a bad look, ARM has now taken it down.

For the uninitiated, ARM Holdings designs various architectures and cores that it licenses to major chipmakers around the world. Its tech can be found in over 100 billion chips manufactured by huge names like Apple and Nvidia as well as many other lesser-known players in the low-power market. If ARM is Windows, you can think of RISC-V as an early Linux. Like ARM, it’s an architecture based on reduced instruction set computing (RISC), but it’s free to use and open to anyone to contribute or modify. While ARM has been around since 1991, RISC-V just got started in 2010 but it’s gaining a lot of ground and ARM’s pitiful website could easily be seen as a legitimising moment for the tech.

Read more

Chromium OS for Raspberry Pi SBCs Is Making a Comeback Soon, Better Than Ever

In July 2016, Callahan wrote to us that he is looking for new team members to join his project to continue full-scale work on Chromium OS for SBCs. Unfortunately, that didn't happen as a few months after the announcement we published back then, Flint Innovations Limited informed us that Chromium OS for SBCs was forked into Flint OS.

Flint Innovations had some big plans for Flint OS, supporting not only Raspberry Pi boards, but also x86 computers with Intel and Nvidia GPUs, and also promised to let users run Android apps, a Google initiative that's now mainstream on Chrome OS and already supported by most Chromebooks out there. In March 2018, Flint OS was bought by Neverware.

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Fedora on the UDOO Neo

Filed under
Red Hat
Hardware
HowTos

The core support for the i.MX6SX SoC and the UDOO Neo is pretty reasonable, with the MMC fixes it’s been very stable, all the core bits are working as expected, included wired and wireless network, thermal, cpufreq, crypto and it looks like the display should work fine. There’s a few quirks that I need to investigate further which should provide for a fun evening or weekend hacking. There has also been recently merged support for the i.MX6SX Cortex-M4 land upstream in Zephyr upstream for the 1.13 release, so getting that running and communication using Open-AMP between Fedora and Zephyr should also be an interesting addition. I think this will be a welcome addition to Fedora 29, and not a moment too soon!!

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Empowering Linux Developers for the New Wave of Innovation

Filed under
Ubuntu

Machine learning and IoT in particular offer huge opportunities for developers, especially those facing the crowded markets of other platforms, to engage with a sizeable untapped audience.

That Linux is open source makes it an amazing breeding ground for innovation. Developers aren’t constrained by closed ecosystems, meaning that Linux has long been the operating system of choice for developers. So by engaging with Linux, businesses can attract the best available developer skills.

The Linux ecosystem has always strived for a high degree of quality. Historically it was the Linux community taking sole responsibility for packaging software, gating each application update with careful review to ensure it worked as advertised on each distribution of Linux. This proved difficult for all sides.

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CentOS & Flatpak - Are we there yet?

Filed under
Red Hat

I like the approach. I really do. It's sensible, it's practical, it's the right thing for ordinary people, and it can help avoid dependency nightmares when one little library breaks and then the damage propagates across the entire distro stack. But for the time being, the standalone app mechanisms aren't robust enough, and my latest CentOS escapade with Flatpak shows it. Not bad but needs improvement.

Specifically, installations should be entirely GUI - no fiddling - and if the GUI package managers in this or that distro can't handle it, then Flatpak ought to provide its own frontend. There should be no games with command line and ugly dot separated package names. Programs ought to work seamlessly - and be equivalent in quality and capabilities to the ordinary repo stock. Finally, the question of fragmentation remains, because if we end with a dozen Snap-like or Flatpak-like tools, we haven't really done anything. You should try Flatpak in your CentOS, and you will be able to grab some nice and cool applications, but be aware that the experience is still rough, and the road to seamless fun is still long. Take care.

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Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Linux Graphics: AMD and NVIDIA

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Vega 20 Support Added To RadeonSI Gallium3D Driver

    With the upcoming Linux 4.18 kernel release due out in August there is the AMDGPU kernel driver support for Vega 20, the yet-to-be-released Vega GPU said to be the 7nm part launching later this year in Radeon Instinct products and featuring 32GB of HBM2 and adding some new deep learning instructions. Now the RadeonSI Gallium3D user-space driver for OpenGL within Mesa has Vega 20 support.

  • NVIDIA 396.24.10 Linux Driver Brings Vulkan 8-Bit / Renderpass2 / Conditional Render

    NVIDIA developers today released the 396.24.10 driver, their latest beta driver for Linux focused on the latest Vulkan innovations and improvements and is joined by the Windows 398.58 driver.

    The NVIDIA 396.24.10 Linux driver (and 398.58 beta for Windows) are focused on delivering the functionality added with the recent Vulkan 1.1.80 specification update.

Linux Graphics: AMD and NVIDIA

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Vega 20 Support Added To RadeonSI Gallium3D Driver

    With the upcoming Linux 4.18 kernel release due out in August there is the AMDGPU kernel driver support for Vega 20, the yet-to-be-released Vega GPU said to be the 7nm part launching later this year in Radeon Instinct products and featuring 32GB of HBM2 and adding some new deep learning instructions. Now the RadeonSI Gallium3D user-space driver for OpenGL within Mesa has Vega 20 support.

  • NVIDIA 396.24.10 Linux Driver Brings Vulkan 8-Bit / Renderpass2 / Conditional Render

    NVIDIA developers today released the 396.24.10 driver, their latest beta driver for Linux focused on the latest Vulkan innovations and improvements and is joined by the Windows 398.58 driver.

    The NVIDIA 396.24.10 Linux driver (and 398.58 beta for Windows) are focused on delivering the functionality added with the recent Vulkan 1.1.80 specification update.

96-core NanoPi Fire3 cluster computer blows past RPi rigs in benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Cluster computer projects are increasingly looking beyond the Raspberry Pi to build devices with faster cluster-friendly SBCs. Here’s a 96-core monster that taps the octa-core NanoPi Fire3.

Cluster computers constructed of Raspberry Pi SBCs have been around for years, ranging from supercomputer-like behemoths to simple hobbyist rigs. More recently, we’ve seen cluster designs that use other open-spec hacker boards, many of which offer higher computer power and faster networking at the same or lower price. Farther below, we’ll examine one recent open source design from Paul Smith at Climbers.net that combines 12 octa-core NanoPi-Fire3 SBCs for a 96-core cluster.

Read more

Also: Low-profile Apollo Lake Mini-ITX board runs Linux

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Android Leftovers

today's leftovers

Games: Atari VCS Console, Humble Store and TUNG (The Ultimate Nerd Game)

  • Atari VCS Console Runs a Custom Linux Distro Called “AtariOS”
    Following criticism of its mediocre internal makeup the Ataris VCS console will now ship with 8GB RAM by default, up from the 4GB proposed during the funding push. It’s a decent increase in memory that should help the system cope better with more intensive indie games (don’t expect AAA titles to play nicely on the machine with the middling AMD Bristol Ridge APU).
  • Humble Store is doing a 'Pixel Perfect Platformers Sale' and it has some top Linux games for cheap
    For those of you who love your platformers, regardless of them being 2D, 3D, puzzle or action adventures there's bound to be something for the bored Linux gamer in the Humble Store Pixel Perfect Platformers Sale.
  • TUNG (The Ultimate Nerd Game) made me realise how stupid I really am
    The Ultimate Nerd Game or TUNG for short, is a first-person sandbox game about building intricate machines and it made me feel so very dumb. If you loved Minecraft's Redstone circuits or anything remotely similar, this is probably a free game you're going to love. For me, it was an exercise in frying my brain like it's in a microwave.

OSS Leftovers

  • Pharmaceutical industry gets first open source platform for Level 4 serialization
    Pharmaceutical companies today for the first time have an open source alternative for level 4 serialization with the launch of QU4RTET, a platform that provides them with new flexibility, transparency and affordability as they comply with global drug anti-counterfeiting laws.
  • Kontron Uses Open Source to Move Beyond Bare Metal
    Kontron, a company known for its embedded computing technology, is leveraging virtualization and open source to become a direct supplier to large service providers, promising to integrate hardware and operating system software with best-of-breed virtual network functions. That new sales strategy has evolved to support containers, particularly as they fit at the edge of the network, which for Kontron AG is the cell tower. In May, Kontron announced that its integrated SYMKLOUD open source platform now supports the latest versions of OpenStack for virtual machines and bare metal, as well as Kubernetes v1.10 for Docker and containers, via its distribution partnership with Canonical.
  • Open Source Expands In Finance With The FINOS Platform
  • Global Open Source Services Market Forecast to 2025 Published by Marketresearchnest
  • Synopsys ARC HS4x Processors Now Supported By GCC
    The GCC 8 compiler brought the Synopsys ARC CPU target while for the GCC 9 release is going to be support for the company's HS4x processors. Merged today to mainline GCC is support for the HS4x CPUs within the ARC target. Adding this newer generation of ARC processors to the GNU Compiler Collection code-base was just a few hundred lines of code with building off the existing target code.
  • GPL Cooperation Commitment gets more support for open source licensing
    Red Hat has announced its open source license enforcement initiative is making new strides. As part of the GPL Cooperation Commitment, 14 new companies have joined the effort to promote greater predictability for GPLv2 and LGPLv2.x licenses. “Through this initiative, we hope ultimately to increase participation in the use and development of open source software by helping to ensure that enforcement, when it takes place, is fair and predictable,” according to the commitment’s website.
  • The Global IP Exchange: Human ingenuity and open source technology
    He said: “Customers do increasingly care about open source, and if you don’t comply you are at risk of upsetting authors, as well as litigation and injunctions.” “If you’re just distributing internally, then you’re fine, but as soon as it leaves your company, then you’ve triggered an obligation.” For those who don’t comply, he warned that either the licensor, or the Free Software Foundation will find out.
  • How to Setup Python Virtual Environment on Ubuntu 18.04
    Python is a versatile programming language that can be used for many different programming projects(Web - Mobile - Desktop). Easy to set up, and written in a relatively straightforward style with immediate feedback on errors, Python is a great choice for beginners and experienced developers alike. Python 3 is the most current version of the language and is considered to be the future of Python. This article will guide you through installing Python 3 on your local Linux machine and setting up a programming virtual environment via the command line. This article will explicitly cover the installation procedures for Ubuntu 18.04, but the general principles apply to any other distribution of Debian Linux.
  • How expensive is globbing for sources in large projects
    Since we have the measurement script, let's use it for something more interesting. Modules are an upcoming C++ feature to increase build times and a ton of other coolness depending on who you ask. The current specification works by having a kind of "module export declaration" at the beginning of source files. The idea is that you first compile those to generate a sort of a module declaration file and then you can start the actual compilation that uses said files. If you thought "waitaminute, that sounds exactly like how FORTRAN is compiled", you are correct. Because of this it has the same problem that you can't compile source files in an arbitrary order, but instead you must first somehow scan them to find out the interdependencies between source (not header) files. In practice what this means is that instead of single-phase compilation all files must be processed twice. All scan operations must be done before any compilation jobs can start because otherwise you might start to compile a file before its dependencies are fully processed. The scanning can be done in one of two ways. Either the build system scans the sources meaning it needs to understand the syntax of source files or the compiler can be invoked in a special preprocessing mode. Note that build systems such as Ninja do not do any such operations by themselves but instead always invoke external processes to do their work.
  • Security updates for Monday