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Monday, 19 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story Do You Have an Xbox? srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:35am
Story This Week at the Movies: Hitch & The Aviator srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:34am
Story Latest On the Browser Wars srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:32am
Story Legislation to regulate games srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:31am
Story Typing Style Can Be Password srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:30am
Story Hey Coool, a Virtual Tour srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:30am
Story Experiences of a Linux Newbie srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:29am
Story June Cleaver meets Fortune 500 srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:29am
Story Predictions of Gloom and Doom srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:29am
Story EBay eyes open source srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:28am

Raspbian Remix Lets You Create Your Own Spin That You Can Install on PC or Mac

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Raspbian PIXEL for PC and Mac is a Debian-based operating system created by the Raspberry Pi Foundation for those who want to run the de facto standard Raspberry Pi OS on their personal computers too. Arne Exton did a remix of Raspbian PIXEL a few years ago to include the Refracta tools.

With the Refracta tools installed by default, users were able to easily install the operating system on their PCs or Macs, as well as to make their own remix of Raspberry Pi Foundation's Raspbian PIXEL OS. Today's update brings the latest software versions and rebases the OS on the latest Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" series.

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Benchmarks Of Russia's "Baikal" MIPS-Based Processors, Running Debian Linux

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A few years back was the news of Russia wanting to get into the CPU business and at the time were aiming for ARM-based processors but ended up settling for MIPS. It turns out those "Baikal" processors are still around and being worked on as indicated by some fresh benchmarks this week.

Back in 2015 is when Baikal Electronics/T-Platforms announced their Baikal-T1 28nm SoC with DDR3 support, clock speeds up to 1.2GHz, SATA connectivity, USB 2.0, and Gigabit Ethernet. The Baikal-T1 was initially advertised as for use in networking appliances and industrial platforms but has also wound up in some Russian desktop PCs.

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Devices: Raspberry Pi, Arduino, LimeSDR and More

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  • Programming Linux Devices With Arduino And The Cloud

    Back in the olden days, when the Wire library still sucked, the Arduino was just a microcontroller. Now, we have single board computers and cheap microcontrollers with WiFi built in. As always, there’s a need to make programming and embedded development more accessible and more widely supported among the hundreds of devices available today.

    At the Embedded Linux Conference this week, [Massimo Banzi] announced the beginning of what will be Arduino’s answer to the cloud, online IDEs, and a vast ecosystem of connected devices. It’s Arduino Create, an online IDE that allows anyone to develop embedded projects and manage them remotely.

  • LimeSDR Mini takes off in satellites

    The Ubuntu-driven LimeSDR Mini SBC has begun shipping to backers, who have spent over $500M on the open source software defined radio hacker board, and it’s now heading to space in a deal with the European Space Agency.

    The topic of 5G mobile networks dominated the recent Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, despite the expectation that widespread usage may be years away. While 5G’s mind-boggling bandwidth captivates our attention, another interesting angle is found in the potential integration with software defined radio (SDR), as seen in OpenAirInterface’s proposed Cloud-RAN (C-RAN) software-defined radio access network.

  • Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ on Sale Now at $35

    Alongside a 200MHz increase in peak CPU clock frequency, we have roughly three times the wired and wireless network throughput, and the ability to sustain high performance for much longer periods.

  • Raspberry Pi Model B+ arrives just in time for Pi Day 2018

    This latest iteration has the same footprint as both the Raspberry Pi 2 Model B and Raspberry Pi 3 Model B, which means it’s about the size of a deck of cards, but it’s now got a 64-bit quad core processor clocked at 1.4GHz, dual-band 2.4GHz and 5GHz 802.11ac Wi-Fi connectivity, Bluetooth 4.2/BLE and Gigabit Ethernet with maximum transfer network speeds of up to 300 Mbps, or three times higher than that of the Model B.

  • The Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ rolls out just in time for Pi Day

    One important thing to note with the new Raspberry Pi is that users are strongly advised to use a “high-quality 2.5A power supply.” In other words, don’t just buy the cheapest adapter you find online. The reason is that the Pi 3 B+ needs “substantially more power than its predecessor.”

  • Google's NSynth Super is an AI synth made of Raspberry Pi

    NSynth is the software - an AI neural network which can generate the sounds, pretty much anything you want. The Super is the box of tricks to make it work and that's the bit that you're probably off to build, right now.

  • Alexa development board runs Linux on Raspberry Pi Compute Module

    Gumstix has launched a version of its Linux-driven Chatterbox Alexa Voice Service development board designed for the RPi Compute Module, and updated its AeroCore 2 drone controller for the DragonBoard 410C.

  • Video: Raspberry Pi 3B+ on Pi Day
  • New Raspberry Pi Packs More Power

    The new release comes two years after the introduction of its predecessor, the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B.

    The Raspberry Pi computer runs the open source Raspbian operating system.

    The Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ is an incremental upgrade to a line of predecessors that have become entrenched in education, hobbyist and industry markets.

    "The initial production run was only 10,000 boards," noted Simon Ritter, deputy CTO of Azul Systems.

Stable kernels 4.15.10 and 4.14.27

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Games: Yorg, Clawface, Cendric, BATTLETECH, Surviving Mars

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Faster app-launching in Cinnamon

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The development team took some time earlier this year to investigate Cinnamon’s performance when it comes to launching applications.

It’s really hard to measure the actual time between the moment the mouse button is clicked and the moment the new application is rendered on the screen, with its window properly mapped, and the mapping window animation completely finished. It’s not something that can be timed accurately, yet we all agreed within the development team to say that it either “was”, or “felt” snappier in MATE and Xfce.

At the time, we didn’t know if it was just down to perception (animations, composition), or a feature (registering new apps with the session for instance), or a performance issue.

We developed a little script and a method to measure how long it took to flood the desktop environment with the creation of 200 windows. We could then measure the time reported by the script to build these 200 windows, and the time it actually took the desktop environment to recover from it and have these windows placed/mapped correctly and ready to be interacted with.

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Some Windows Server 2016 vs. Linux Network Benchmarks

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A Phoronix Premium supporter recently requested some Windows vs. Linux networking performance benchmarks. That is being done as part of a larger comparison also featuring the popular BSDs, but for some initial measurements, here are some Netperf networking performance metrics on Microsoft Windows Server 2016 and various Linux distributions.

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Ubuntu 18.04 Versus Six Other Linux Distributions On AMD EPYC

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With Ubuntu 18.04 LTS set to be released next month and its final package configuration quickly falling into place, we have begun firing up some benchmarks for seeing how this Ubuntu 18.04 "Bionic Beaver" release is comparing to various other Linux distributions. Up first as part of this series of benchmarks is using an AMD EPYC workstation/server for seeing how the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS performance compares to six other Linux distributions.

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Linux Mint Devs to Enable Faster Launching of Apps on Cinnamon for Linux Mint 19

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As you probably know already, Cinnamon is the default desktop environment of the Ubuntu-based Linux Mint operating system. It uses parts of the GNOME Stack at its core, which means that it's not so lightweight as its MATE or Xfce counterparts, so launching apps isn't as fast as you'd like it to be lately.

That's why the Linux Mint development team spent some time earlier this year to investigate and debug any performance hogs in Cinnamon, especially when launching the pre-installed applications. They compared Cinnamon with the Metacity window manager and found out that the former was six times slower.

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Chromium and Firefox Web Browsers Are Now Installable as Snaps on Ubuntu Linux

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Canonical's Snappy technologies are becoming more and more popular these days as the company behind the widely used Ubuntu plans to enable them by default and even make them a first-class citizen in future releases of its Linux-based operating system.

The great thing about Snap apps is that they are secure by design, utilizing a container-style approach mechanism for deploying software on various GNU/Linux distributions that support Canonical's Snappy universal binary format.

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Qt Creator 4.6 RC released

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We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.6 RC!

Since the beta release we have been busy with bug fixing. Please refer to the beta blog post and our change log for an overview of what is new in Qt Creator 4.6. As always this is a final call for feedback from you before we release 4.6.0, so we would be happy to hear from you on our bug tracker, the mailing list, or on IRC.

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Mozilla: New Firefox Snap, Firefox 60 Plans and These Weeks in Firefox

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  • Firefox is now available as a Snap package

    The latest version of Mozilla Firefox is available as a Snap package for Ubuntu and other Linux distros. Not just any ol’d Snap package either, but an official, made-by-Mozilla Snap package. It’s arrival, without any sort of formal fanfare (yet) has been a long time coming.

  • Firefox 60 Is In Beta With Web Authentication & Policy Engine Support

    Other changes in Firefox 60.0 beta include the new Firefox Quantum CSS engine being used to render the browser's user-interface, enhanced camera privacy indicators, support for promises with IndexedDB transactions, and more.

    There doesn't appear to be anything new with regards to Wayland support in Firefox 60 Beta.

    Firefox 60.0 should be officially released in early May.

  • These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 34

Amid congressional mandate to open source DoD’s software code, serves as guidepost

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As part of the 2018 National Defense Authorization Act, the Defense Department has until June to start moving much of its custom-developed software source code to a central repository and begin managing and licensing it via open source methods.

The mandate might prove daunting for an organization in which open source practices are relatively scarce, especially considering that, until recently, there was no established open source playbook for the federal government. That’s begun to change, however, with the Office of Management and Budget’s, and its DoD corollary,, run by the Defense Digital Service (DDS).

In February, underwent a “relaunch,” changing it from a GitHub-hosted, text-only, how-to guide to what its managers say is both a code repository and a full-fledged toolset for software program managers who need guidance on how to engage in open source practices within the government.

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Also: Hortonworks’ Shaun Bierweiler: Enterprise Open Source Offers Options to Agencies

Security: Torvalds Rant Over AMD Flaws/Report, Intel Microcode Updates, Yahoo and Kubernetes

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  • Linus Torvalds Roasts CTS Labs After They Exposed AMD Chip Vulnerabilities

    Just a couple of days back, CTS researchers exposed more than a dozen ‘critical’ vulnerabilities in AMD chips marketed under the brand names Ryzen and Epyc. The company also claimed that a backdoor exists in AMD processors. Their revelation came with a well-decorated website, a whitepaper, and a video.

  • Torvalds wades into CTS Labs' AMD chip security report
  • Linux Torvalds casts shade on CTS Labs' AMD CPU flaw security report
  • Intel Rolls Out Updated, Post-Spectre CPU Microcode (20180312)

    Intel has published the Intel Processor Microcode Package for Linux 20180312 release with the latest improvements around the microcode-based approach for Spectre CPU vulnerability mitigation, succeeding their microcode updates from earlier in the year.

  • Judge Says Yahoo Still On The Hook For Multiple Claims Related To Three Billion Compromised Email Accounts

    A federal judge is going to let a bunch of people keep suing Yahoo over its three-year run of continual compromise. Yahoo had hoped to get the class action suit tossed, stating that it had engaged in "unending" efforts to thwart attacks, but apparently it just wasn't good enough to prevent every single one of its three billion email accounts from falling into the hands of hackers.

  • 3 best practices for securing Kubernetes environments

    The Kubernetes orchestration platform is such a gigantic open source project that its evolution is inherently rapid. The pace of change significantly increases the importance of adhering to security best practices when using the ever-changing Kubernetes platform to automate deployment, scaling, and management of containerized cloud-native applications.

    Ultimately, effective security also supports the entire Kubernetes project, since the technology's overall adoption depends on the confidence and trust that Kubernetes earns and establishes. That said, standard security procedures and practices that work well in traditional environments are often inadequate for securing Kubernetes environments, where traffic is vastly more dynamic, and where there must be security in place around the pods, containers, nodes, and images.

Games: Pillars of Eternity, Life is Strange and More

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today's howtos

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More in Tux Machines

Replacing Windows

  • Ubuntu-Based Zorin OS Gets Better Support for Windows Apps, Desktop Improvements
    A new maintenance update of the Ubuntu-based Zorin OS GNU/Linux distribution arrived at the end of this week with a bunch of enhancements to its desktop environment, as well as the latest versions of core components and apps. Zorin OS 12.3 is here as the latest stable update of the Ubuntu-based operating system with a focus on improving the security, stability, and functionality of Zorin OS, which was always known as one of the most reliable open-source alternatives to Microsoft's Windows operating system. Therefore, probably the most important change of the Zorin OS 12.3 release is the introduction of Wine 3.0, the latest stable version of the compatibility layer for running Windows programs on Linux and UNIX-like systems, which ensures better compatibility with more Windows apps and games on Zorin OS.
  • Microsoft tries forcing Mail users to open links in Edge, and people are freaking out

    Under the new rules, it doesn’t matter which browser you have selected as the default; if you use the basic Mail app within Windows, any link you click will open up Edge.

  • Google picks up another win for G Suite as Airbus grounds Microsoft Office

    With over 130,000 employees, Airbus uses a lot of office productivity software. It recently decided to make a big bet on Google’s G Suite software package after running the company for years on hosted versions of Microsoft Office, according to a report.  

Games: Kingdom Ka, Starmancer and More

OSS Leftovers

  • LG Announces webOS Open-Source Edition
    What was Palm webOS nearly a decade ago is seeing its latest incarnation as LG webOS Open-Source Edition. The interesting history of webOS continues... While you probably recall HP acquired Palm in 2010 and with that there was webOS on the HP TouchPad. Around 2012 is when HP then announced they would publish the webOS source code as "Open webOS". WebOS was then acquired by LG Electronics where it's been in use for a few years now for smart TVs, IoT, and other LG devices. There's also been a few offshoots over the years like LuneOS as a fork of webOS.
  • Mi A1 Oreo Kernel source code released by Xiaomi
    Xiaomi’s first Android One phone, the Mi A1 was expected to receive Android 8.0 Oreo update by the end December, and the company did roll out the update to the device under the stipulated time. However, the kernel source for the upgrade was left covered with no access to it for third-party developers. This also violated the GNU General Public License, version 2 (GPLv2) and also hampered the advancement of developers who base their codes on source codes. Thankfully, after a delay of more than two months, Xiaomi has finally released the kernel source code of Android 8.1 for the Xiaomi Mi A1.
  • GSoC and Outreachy: Mentors don't need to be Debian Developers
    A frequent response I receive when talking to prospective mentors: "I'm not a Debian Developer yet". As student applications have started coming in, now is the time for any prospective mentors to introduce yourself on the debian-outreach list if you would like to help with any of the listed projects or any topics that have been proposed spontaneously by students without any mentor. It doesn't matter if you are a Debian Developer or not. Furthermore, mentoring in a program like GSoC or Outreachy is a form of volunteering that is recognized just as highly as packaging or any other development activity. When an existing developer writes an email advocating your application to become a developer yourself, they can refer to your contribution as a mentor. Many other processes, such as requests for DebConf bursaries, also ask for a list of your contributions and you can mention your mentoring experience there.
  • 11th Open Source Day Conference
    On May 23rd, Warsaw will host the 11th edition of Open Source Day. OSD is the largest conference about open source in Poland and CEE region, gathering every year nearly 1000 participants. The programme of the upcoming edition is focused mainly on practical sessions devoted to the most important directions of IT market development. Registration for the event is already open. For the first 600 attendees, participation in the conference is free-of-charge. Open Source Day is the biggest event in Poland and CEE region dedicated to open source. Over 6,000 people took part in previous editions, and several thousand followed the event online. Open Source Day is the knowledge exchange platform about open software, as one of the most important trends in the development of modern technologies, enabling creation of high-quality, stable IT solutions, which today are the basis for all branches of the economy.
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  • March Add(on)ness: Reverse Image Search (2) Vs Unpaywall (3)
  • Facebook, Google and Big Switch Networks to Demonstrate Open Source Collaboration with Next-Gen Network Operating Systems During OCP Summit Keynote
  • 6 common questions about agile development practices for teams
    You’ve probably heard a speaker ask this question at the end of their presentation. This is the most important part of the presentation—after all, you didn't attend just to hear a lecture but to participate in a conversation and a community. Recently I had the opportunity to hear my fellow Red Hatters present a session called "Agile in Practice" to a group of technical students at a local university. During the session, software engineer Tomas Tomecek and agile practitioners Fernando Colleone and Pavel Najman collaborated to explain the foundations of agile methodology and showcase best practices for day-to-day activities.

Red Hat's GPL-Centric Initiative, Upcoming Fedora Test Day