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Sunday, 21 Jul 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Fedora Core 6 Test 3 Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

The final test release is now available for the upcoming Fedora Core 6. Looking to steer clear of Microsoft Vista? Fedora Core 6 has progressed wonderfully in the GNU/Linux desktop arena. With Fedora Core 6 Test 3 (FC6T3) are countless improvements including new artwork, GNOME 2.16.0, yum support from Anaconda, Xen virtualization improvements, startup performance improvements, and a new default font.

Screenshots @ Phoronix.

KPhotoAlbum Splash Screen Contest moves to Voting phase

Filed under
KDE

The vote will run in two rounds, first you vote on the 28 contributions, next the five highest rated will go to the second round, where you vote a second time. blackie says, "I am truely impressed with the amount and quality of submissions."

Introducing the KDE:Community Project

Filed under
SUSE

You may think that I have blogged about every KDE-related openSUSE build service project by now. Not quite yet. Various people started to package additional applications using the build service in the last founded KDE:Community project.

Quick Tip: Add CDROMs to apt’s sources using apt-cdrom

Filed under
HowTos

apt-cdrom is a simple command to add CDROMs to apt’s sources.list file. Its syntax is a variation on this basic command line:

Full Tip.

Opera Trond's Final Curtain

After seven years of service Opera web browser developer, Trond Werner Hansen, is leaving to pursue interests in music. In his final farewell, he talks of some of the changes he's seen and how it aligned with his vision for Opera.

Is Ubuntu CE Needed?

Filed under
Ubuntu

If we take a look at the mission statement on the Ubuntu Christian Edition homepage, it states "To bring the power of Ubuntu Linux, combined with the best Open Source Christian software, to the world". What bothers me about this is that the word "Christian" is exploited while making this distro.

OSDL Patent Project Under Attack

Filed under
OSS

Controversy has erupted over an initiative by the Open Source Development Labs, known as Open Source as Prior Art, which is designed to improve the quality of software patents and thereby reduce the number of patents that can be used to threaten open-source software developers and users.

Book Review: Ubuntu Linux For Non-Geeks by Rickford Grant

Filed under
Reviews

Enter the new book title Ubuntu Linux For Non-Geeks by Rickford Grant. It's geared towards even novice computer users who are interested in seeing what this Ubuntu Linux thing is all about (which they can even do without installing it on their computer at all, thanks to the included Live CD), but wouldn't mind a little guidance while doing so.

Microsoft sued over use of name

Filed under
Legal

Dexter + Chaney, a 25-year-old Seattle company that makes construction-management software, is suing Microsoft for trademark infringement.

Virtually Speaking: Linux Vendors Not Zen Over Xen

Filed under
Linux

So much for peace, love, and community. The Linux vendors are as catty as those in any other space. Especially when they are trying to hold on to or build market share. It does, however, demonstrate how important virtualization is to these vendors' strategies.

Xgl in action with Mandriva 2007.0 (nearly final)

Filed under
MDV

Xgl is the new hype, let’s see if it works well under Mandriva! Just a little snapshot before release. Xgl works nicely and is great, here are some screenshots. Not much text, and not a lot of screenshots, but what's there is interesting. Smile

Those Screenshots.

Educators examine pros, cons of open source platforms

Filed under
OSS

Simon Fraser University CIO Jim Cranston says software licensing fees are one impediment to using emerging technologies in areas such as e-learning. Perhaps Cranston hasn't heard of Moodle.

Fedora Core 6 & fglrx drivers

Filed under
HowTos

Yesterday was the third (and final) test release candidate for Fedora Core 6. Initial support for Fedora Core 6 was brought in the packaging scripts with the 8.28.8 drivers. With the release of FC6T3, it seems the fglrx drivers are working but it does (currently) require a few tweaks on the end of the user.

aKademy Awards 2006

Filed under
KDE

This year aKademy will continue with tradition created at aKademy 2005 of awarding the people that made an outstanding contribution to KDE in the last year. The award ceremony will be on Sunday, September 24th at 17:50-18:00.

FVWM-Crystal — speed and transparency

FVWM-Crystal is an eye-candy, functional and ultra-fast desktop environment for GNU/Linux, based on FVWM. Crystal can be used even on very old machines, thus it is a noticeable alternative to popular desktop choices like XFCE or Fluxbox.

Mystery deepens around missing Oakland woman

Filed under
Reiser

Nine days have passed since Nina `Nenasha" Reiser was last seen dropping off her son and daughter at their father's Montclair home. Nina Reiser filed for divorce in August 2004. Hans Reiser was not at home Tuesday afternoon, and did not return messages seeking comment.

Adding source lists using apt-setup

Filed under
HowTos

apt-setup is an interactive program that simplifies adding sources to apt’s sources.list. It knows about all the major debian mirrors and can help you select one. It can even use apt-cdrom to scan CDs.

Book review: Linux Smart Homes for Dummies

Filed under
Reviews

It's nice to see a yellow and black "For Dummies" book with "Linux" in the title -- namely Wiley's Linux Smart Homes for Dummies . Author and home automation expert Neil Cherry has put together 364 pages and a CD-ROM that cover not only the typical X10 hardware and software characteristic of home automation, but also networking, video, audio, and even heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) control that can make your house the envy of your neighborhood.

How to display or show information about a Linux Kernel module or drivers

Filed under
HowTos

I was just browsing our forum and come across following question: How do I find out detailed information about a Linux Kernel module or device drivers?

Mozilla updates Firefox, Thunderbird

Filed under
Moz/FF

The Mozilla Corporation today issued small updates for its popular Firefox Web browser and Thunderbird e-mail applications, primarily targeting security problems.

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More in Tux Machines

Database News on YugaByte Going for Apache 2.0 Licence

  • YugaByte Becomes 100% Open Source Under Apache 2.0 License

    YugaByte, a provider of open source distributed SQL databases, announced that YugaByte DB is now 100% open source under the Apache 2.0 license, bringing previously commercial features into the open source core. The transition breaks the boundaries between YugaByte’s Community and Enterprise editions by bringing previously commercial-only, closed-source features such as Distributed Backups, Data Encryption, and Read Replicas into the open source core project distributed under the permissive Apache 2.0 license. Starting immediately, there is only one edition of YugaByte DB for developers to build their business-critical, cloud-native applications.

  • YugaByte's Apache 2.0 License Delivers 100% Open Source Distributed SQL Database

    YugaByte, the open source distributed SQL databases comapny, announced that YugaByte DB is now 100 percent open source under the Apache 2.0 license, bringing previously commercial features into the open source core. The move, in addition to other updates available now through YugaByte DB 1.3, allows users to more openly collaborate across what is now the world’s most powerful open source distributed SQL database.

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: YugaByte DB

    This week’s SD Times Open Source Project of the Week is the newly open-sourced YugaByte DB, which allows users to better collaborate on the distributed SQL database. The move to the open-source core project distributed under the Apache 2.0 license makes previously closed-sourced features such as distributed backups, data encryption and read replicas more accessible, according to the team. By doing this, YugaByte plans to break the boundaries between YugaByte’s Community and Enterprise editions. “YugaByte DB combines PostgreSQL’s language breadth with Oracle-like reliability, but on modern cloud infrastructure. With our licensing changes, we have removed every barrier that developers face in adopting a business-critical database and operations engineers face in running a fleet of database clusters, with extreme ease,” said Kannan Muthukkaruppan, co-founder and CEO of YugaByte.

Programming: Ruby, NativeScript, Python, Rust/C/C++ FUD From Microsoft

Security Leftovers

  • Alas, Poor PGP

    The first is an assertion that email is inherently insecure and can’t be made secure. There are some fairly convincing arguments to be made on that score; as it currently stands, there is little ability to hide metadata from prying eyes. And any format that is capable of talking on the network — as HTML is — is just begging for vulnerabilities like EFAIL. But PGP isn’t used just for this. In fact, one could argue that sending a binary PGP message as an attachment gets around a lot of that email clunkiness — and would be right, at the expense of potentially more clunkiness (and forgetfulness). What about the web-of-trust issues? I’m in agreement. I have never really used WoT to authenticate a key, only in rare instances trusting an introducer I know personally and from personal experience understand how stringent they are in signing keys. But this is hardly a problem for PGP alone. Every encryption tool mentioned has the problem of validating keys. The author suggests Signal. Signal has some very strong encryption, but you have to have a phone number and a smartphone to use it. Signal’s strength when setting up a remote contact is as strong as SMS. Let that disheartening reality sink in for a bit. (A little social engineering could probably get many contacts to accept a hijacked SIM in Signal as well.) How about forward secrecy? This is protection against a private key that gets compromised in the future, because an ephemeral session key (or more than one) is negotiated on each communication, and the secret key is never stored. This is a great plan, but it really requires synchronous communication (or something approaching it) between the sender and the recipient. It can’t be used if I want to, for instance, burn a backup onto a Bluray and give it to a friend for offsite storage without giving the friend access to its contents. There are many, many situations where synchronous key negotiation is impossible, so although forward secrecy is great and a nice enhancement, we should assume it to be always applicable. [...] My current estimate is that there’s no magic solution right now. The Sequoia PGP folks seem to have a good thing going, as does Saltpack. Both projects are early in development, so as a privacy-concerned person, should you trust them more than GPG with appropriate options? That’s really hard to say.

  • Armadillo Is An Open-Source “USB Firewall” Device To Protect You Against USB Attacks

    Exchanging data using USB devices is something that we do on a daily basis. But how often do you think that the next USB device that you’ll plug into your PC’s port could be malicious? In the past, researchers have unveiled 29 types of USB attacks that could compromise your sensitive data by simply plugging in a USB device. Globotron’s Armadillo is a device that you could use to protect yourself from USB attacks.

  • Open source solutions in autonomous driving: safety is more than an afterthought [Ed: A lot less likely to contain back doors, unlike proprietary software where this has become rather 'standard' a 'feature']

    In the automotive industry, in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) systems were one of the early adopters of open source operating systems, namely Linux. Today’s innovation and success with IVIs can largely be attributed to this approach. Collaborative efforts such as the GENIVI Alliance and Automotive Grade Linux—where automakers, suppliers, and their competitors agree to share common elements of the IVI software stack—are enabling rapid development in this area.

  • New open source solution reduces the risks associated with cloud deployments [Ed: This is an inherently flawed kind of logic because if you handed over control to AWS, then the Pentagon already controls everything and thus you have zero security, you're 'pwned' by definition]

    The Galahad software will be deployed to AWS and provides a nested hypervisor on AWS instances. There, it will monitor role-based virtual machines virtually across all levels of the application stack including the docker container: the basic unit of software that packages an application to run quickly between computing environments.

  • Open-Source Exploit: Private Keys in MyDashWallet Exposed for Two Months- Users Should Move Funds Immediately [Ed: Highly misleading headline. This has nothing to do with "Open Source"; it's about some fool who uploaded private keys]

    The private keys of Dash crypto coins being held in online software “hot wallet” called MyDashWallet have been exposed to hackers for two months, and anyone using the wallet should immediately move funds out. A “hot wallet” is any cryptocurrency software “wallet” connected to the Internet.

Devices: 'IoT', SparkFun and Beelink L55

  • Top 20 Best Internet of Things Projects (IoT Projects) That You can Make Right Now

    Internet of Things (IoT) is a new predominant technology for this advanced world. This technology can change the lifestyle people lead. Question is what the Internet of Things is? IoT can be described as a network of physical objects connected through the internet. Physical objects could be anything that contains embedded electronics, software, sensor, etc. with the internet. Using the IP addresses, those smart objects can exchange data among the network and can make a decision. A significant number of researches is going on over the IoT trends and projects. In this article, we will talk about a few IoT project ideas based on standard IoT protocols, so that readers get the basic knowledge about the Internet of Things. These internet of things example are keen, useful, and interesting to build.

  • Open-Source SparkFun Module Supports Low-Power TensorFlow Machine Learning

    SparkFun has released the SparkFun Artemis, Engineering Version, an open-source embedded development kit that supports the TensorFlow machine learning environment. Designed for toolchain-agnostic, low-power machine learning development, the 15.5 mm x 10.5 mm Artemis board includes... [...] In addition to a secure firmware update system, flexible, serial peripherals, a suite of clock sources, and camera compatibility, the Artemis board features large SMD pads that support carrier board implementations. SparkFun has launched three carrier boards in conjunction with the release of the Artemis, Engineering version board: the BlackBoard Artemis (Arduino Uno footprint); BlackBoard Artemis Nano (smallest form factor); and BlackBoard Artemis ATP (with 48 GPIO pins).

  • Beelink L55 Review – An Intel Core i3-5005U Mini PC Tested with Windows 10 & Ubuntu 18.04

    With the shortage of Gemini Lake processors, some manufacturers have taken to releasing new mini PCs using older CPUs